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How to survive your first three months at a new job

Securing the job offer is only half the battle. It’s now up to you to prove to your new management team your value to their organization. While your new job can be intimidating, don’t let your fear get the best of you.  

A new professional chapter is always a mixed bag of emotions, from the pure joy and excitement of receiving a job offer, to the anxiety that can accompany new responsibilities, colleagues and management. Ready to succeed from day one? Check out these tips to help you survive and thrive during your first three months at a new job.

Make a good first impression

Make your first impression a good one by being open, friendly and appropriate. If your employer didn’t mention a dress code during the interview or within your job offer, remember to dress for success. Combine your professional outfit with a confident smile to nail your first impression! Keep in mind that many businesses are opting for a scent-free environment so refrain from strong fragrances such as body sprays or perfumes.

Introduce yourself

Taking the initiative to introduce yourself can make a big impact in terms of how you are perceived by your new co-workers. A quick introduction will help you build relationships with colleagues from your first day on the job and proves that you are eager to join the team.

Ask questions

They say there’s no such thing as a stupid question, but here at Adecco we also believe there’s no such thing as too many questions. Not only does asking questions ensure you complete the task at hand properly the first time, it also exemplifies your initiative to learn your new organization’s policies and procedures. And make sure to listen carefully! Repeat questions or failure to apply the feedback may leave a bad impression with your new colleagues.

Get involved

Your first three months at a new job can feel like you’re out of the loop when it comes to social structure and corporate culture. Don’t be discouraged! It takes time to find your role both professionally and socially in a new workplace. Overcome this hurdle by getting involved. Offer to join the health and safety committee, volunteer to assist with social events, or simply eat lunch with your colleagues in the break room. Your efforts won’t go unnoticed!

Make your voice heard

It’s never easy speaking up when you’re the new one, but it’s imperative to make yourself heard during your first three months to cement a future of professional growth within your new organization. If contributing in person is too daunting, set yourself a goal to share a suggestion via email within your first month. Positive feedback will give you the courage you need to continue your contributions in person, proving your value to your new team.

Set good habits

Don’t forget to look at your new job as a fresh start. Take advantage of it as an opportunity to become the best professional you can be. Make the most of your new beginning by setting healthy work habits from the get-go. Organize your calendar and task list. Create a list of skills you want to develop. Identify personal and organizational inefficiencies and create procedures to increase productivity.

Remember, with a little effort these first three months can set the stage for an awesome career. So when anxiety inevitably strikes, take a deep breath, refocus and hit the ground running.

Lēad Blog is part of Adecco and Roevin Canada. Find and apply to your dream job, or get more career advice from our experts.

 

The Impact of Health and Wellness on Productivity

It’s no surprise that the more an employer invests in their workforce, the more productive and loyal their workforce will be. To reach optimal productivity levels, organizations should consider exploring health and wellness initiatives that support their employees’ physical and mental well-being.

Regardless of your organization’s size, a focus on health and wellness can increase productivity while diminishing lost time from work. Not to mention, implementing specific benefits can act as an incentive when attracting and retaining top talent within your organization.

Here are some ways you can increase the overall wellness of their workforce.

1. Incentives and organized programs

 It’s proven that increased physical activity leads to improved sleep, reduced stress and more energy, so encouraging it through incentives and organized programs are a great starting point to get the ball rolling. Consider a reimbursement plan for sports activities or fitness memberships, or even, start a corporate-wide sports team or running group. These simple measures can have positive short-term effects on your workforce’s well-being.

2. Encourage time off

Organizations offer time off to provide employees with a mental break from the day-to-day stress of their jobs. However, 27% of Canadians go without vacation for a year or more, while 17% say their work schedule doesn’t allow them to take vacation. Encourage employees to take full advantage of their allotted time off and offer solutions — such as cross training — to ensure they don’t feel overwhelmed by the workload they’ll be faced with upon their return.  And when they do go off, allow employees to feel supported in their decision to disconnect and recharge.

3. Additional benefits coverage

Some employees may prefer a holistic approach to medicine, therefore, incorporating alternative medicine options within your benefits program can help promote a sense of well-being. Including coverage for osteopathy, massages and acupuncture can go a long way in helping your employees increase mental and physical well-being. As well, coverage options such as nutritionists, dieticians and smoking cessation can drastically improve the health of your employees — while reducing employee healthcare costs.

4. Assistance resources

Focusing on an employee’s wellness also means allowing them to have access to resources to take matters into their own hands. Consider supporting strong mental and physical health through employee assistance programs, which provide resources and support for employees who may be suffering from personal issues such as substance abuse, family issues, stress, depression and anxiety. This type of program ultimately enables employees to achieve peace of mind and be their best self at work.

Simply put, the implementation of specific corporate programs and benefits which promote employee health and well-being sets an organization up in a healthier, happier and more productive landscape.

For more information or assistance on how to start making the link between health and wellness, and productivity, contact your local Adecco branch today!

Lēad Blog is part of Adecco and Roevin Canada. Hire your perfect team, or get more staffing advice from our experts.

Ask Adecco: Extended Absences

Ask Adecco brings you job-search advice from our experts. In our first installment, we asked Adecco Canada’s Director of Talent and Employee Relations, Marla Goddard, about extended absences.

What advice do you have for someone who doesn’t know how to start the process of returning to the workforce after an extended absence?

Preparing to re-enter the workforce will take work! It’s all about thinking strategically about what you want and formulating a plan to get there. To get started, I’d recommend updating your resume. This lets you take inventory of your skills, certifications and references, and will help you identify areas that need to be updated.

Skills and certifications

Are there any transferable skills that you can add to your resume? Even if you developed them while doing tasks completely unrelated to the types of jobs you’re looking for, soft skills such as organization or communication, and other skills like record-keeping, can be added to your resume to help demonstrate continuous learning.

Depending on the amount of time you’ve been away, you may want to think about taking refresher training or additional classes to help you get back up to speed with the skills and knowledge that your industry requires. And don’t forget about any certifications that may have expired while you were away; work on renewing your certifications to show potential employers that you’re up-to-date on industry knowledge.

LinkedIn

You will also need to spend some time on your LinkedIn profile. While your updated resume will be useful here, it’s not all you’ll need to ensure you have a suitable LinkedIn profile. Add a summary introducing yourself and what you’re looking for. Join groups related to your profession and field, and start adding to the ongoing discussion to demonstrate your knowledge. Also, don’t be afraid to post about re-entering the workforce — you never know who might have an opportunity that would be perfect for you. LinkedIn is an invaluable resource when looking for a new job, so make sure to spend some time exploring its features and how they might help you.

Networking

Now that you have an understanding of your skills and the job market, you should also start reaching out to your network. Telling your network about your return shouldn’t be restricted to your LinkedIn network; start with your personal network and move outward. Don’t forget about former colleagues. Not only will reconnecting with your network help get you top-of-mind with people who might have an interesting open opportunity, it helps you confirm references from people who can tell potential employers how great you are.

If you feel that your network could be bigger, consider joining professional associations or groups where people with similar professional interests or skill sets gather. Attend meetings and networking events to get the most out of your membership. Consider events put on by your local chamber of commerce or board of trade. Industry-specific seminars are another great opportunity to expand your network while updating your knowledge-base.

Should extended absences be included in resumes?

While you don’t have to go into too much detail, it’s a good idea to address the employment absence in your timeline. Even if you indicate that the time spent away from the job market was due to “family responsibilities” or “travel,” explaining your absence helps bridge the gap for potential employers. Prepare your elevator pitch and remember to be confident with your response!

What are the next steps?

While we all want to immediately find the perfect job, it will probably take some time to find your next opportunity. Always remember the following:

Be open

Things in the workplace can change rapidly. Whether it’s new technology or skill requirements, people or organizational structures, by remaining flexible and open to learning new things, you’ll be well-positioned to succeed.

Consider all your opportunities

While it’s frustrating to realize that you may not be able to return to the level of seniority you had before your absence, consider the opportunity separately from the job title. Remember, this could be your stepping stone to other opportunities down the road.

Work out the logistics

Before you commit to anything, ensure that you’ve worked out the logistics of your return to work. Do you have adequate child or elder care in place? Have you identified your preferred commute time? Once you’ve done this, you may want to consider alternative work options to ease into a new routine.

Work options

Don’t overlook the benefits of the following work options.

  • Consider volunteer work to brush up on your skills and network with like-minded individuals. It can also help you ease into a work routine while contributing to your community.
  • Part time or temporary work can help you (and those in your life who will be affected by your return to work) become adjusted to a new routine. Even if the ultimate goal is to find full-time work, a part-time or temporary position can help you identify what you’re looking for in your new career.
  • Investigate work-from-home or telecommuting positions that can help you bridge home-life needs with work opportunities.
  • Consider a staffing agency like Adecco where we can help you get back into the workforce, so you can earn a paycheque while building your experience.

With these tips, re-entering the workforce doesn’t have to be a daunting task. For help finding your next favourite job, check us out here.

Have a job search question for us? Use #AskAdecco to send us your questions!

 

Marla Goddard is Director, Talent and Employee Relations at Adecco Canada. She jointly supports over 350 colleagues and 12,000 temporary Associates in all aspects of Human Resources Management. She has a passion for people which shows in the work she has done in the areas of employee relations, recruitment and helping Adecco Canada be a great place to work.

 

Lēad Blog is part of Adecco and Roevin Canada. Find and apply to your dream job, or get more career advice from our experts.

Perspectives on Talent Competitiveness for Canadian Businesses

Struggling to grow, attract and retain talent? The sixth edition of the Global Talent Competitiveness Index can help you overcome it. The Adecco Group, in partnership with INSEAD and TATA Communications, gathered this year’s report, which ranks the talent competitiveness of individual countries and cities. The report identifies entrepreneurialism as an input for growth and innovation, and the role cities play in the process.   

The 2019 Global Talent Competitiveness Index (GTCI) report is a rigorous analysis of 68 variables across 125 national economies covering all groups of income and levels of development. The report aims to be an action tool for continuous improvement in linking talent to economic development, and a means to stimulate dialogue between governments, business, academia, professionals and their associations, and citizens.

How can employers make talent decisions using the GTCI?

GTCI is a benchmarking report that measures and ranks countries based on their ability to grow, attract and retain talent. The report provides insight to decision makers to develop talent strategies, overcome talent mismatches and become more competitive in the global marketplace.

How well does Canada rank in talent competitiveness?

This year, Canada maintained its 15th position overall within the index. For the first time this year, however, 3 Canadian cities also appear on the list, with Montreal (24) and Toronto (33) joining last year’s sole Canadian city to make the list: Ottawa (29).

Entrepreneurialism

The 2019 GTCI report focuses on entrepreneurial talent. As digitalization and globalization continue to play a prominent role in enabling entrepreneurialism, new approaches are on the rise such as policies, incentives and management strategies to stimulate entrepreneurial talent. AI and automation will create new business models that will depend on entrepreneurial talents for success. Encouraging an entrepreneurial spirit within the workforce secures top talent and helps futureproof employees in the workplace.

Competitiveness gap

While the report has identified entrepreneurialism as a growing trend within talent competition, it has also uncovered an increasing gap in talent between higher income and lower income countries. As the gap continues to increase, low income countries struggle to compete in the talent market, which further contributes to the inequality. This may also reflect a growing skills gap and the challenges countries face in addressing diminishing pools of skilled talent.

Cities

As trends for talent competition among nations increasingly rely on entrepreneurial talent, there is a corollary requirement of openness to secure growth and success. GTCI found that large cities have become hubs for entrepreneurial talent, vastly reshaping the global talent scene. The report notes that Nordic European and American cities dominate the talent competitiveness ranking and currently play a valuable role in developing and nurturing entrepreneurial talent. Though few cities are currently targeting talent with specializations that link to local issues such as waste management and transportation, this is expected to change, and entrepreneurial talent will provide further support to the development of smart city strategies.

View the 2019 GTCI report

To view the full Global Talent Competition Index or for further analysis on its findings, visit the GTCI website today.

Lēad Blog is part of Adecco and Roevin Canada. Hire your perfect team, or get more staffing advice from our experts.

Recruitment Trends in Engineering and Technology

Ready to improve your recruitment strategy in 2019? Roevin has you covered with the latest recruiting trends to keep your business competitive in the search for top engineering and information technology talent.

Securing the top engineering and IT talent can be challenging for a business in today’s candidate-driven market. Traditional recruitment methods combined with a competitive compensation package are no longer enough to snag those top candidates. So, if you’re planning your 2019 recruitment strategies, keep these top recruitment trends in mind.

Internships

Not only are internships a great way for organizations to show their support for students by offering them real work experience, they also offer great benefits to the employer. The internship period acts as the perfect opportunity to teach young professionals about your business as well as providing on-the-job training for prospects. While it’s not a new concept, internships continue to be one of the best ways for new engineers to find employment.

Social recruitment

Social recruitment simplifies the process of networking between hiring managers and qualified candidates. LinkedIn is easily the most popular, but there are several other industry-specific networking websites to take advantage of. Websites such as The Engineering Exchange, Engineering.com and Design News allow engineers to exchange content, stay up to date with emerging trends and learn about job opportunities with other professionals solely within their field, making these networking sites a great resource for hiring managers.

Predictive analytics

Even the best recruiters can’t determine the likelihood of a candidate accepting a position or how long an employee will stay with the firm. Predictive analytic platforms can help identify the factors that differentiate two applicants who appear identical on paper but whose behaviour may differ greatly. This technology helps the employer select talent with the skills, experience and education to complete the job and the behavioural habits that fit their corporate culture.

AI in the Interview process

Artificial intelligence (AI) has been assisting recruiters through their hiring and on-boarding processes for a long time, but its role within recruitment continues to grow. AI can now be used in the interview process to form questions based on the organization’s needs, saving time for the recruiter to focus on a training program that guarantees success. Further, AI software can track facial movements from candidates including unusual eye movement and stammering that may indicate excessive nerves or lying.

Chatbots for candidate screening

Screening candidates can be a timely undertaking that often produces few, if any, potential candidates. Utilizing chatbots to screen potential candidates is a great way to automate the hiring process. Candidates answer a few questions about their skills, experience and education and the chatbots search through the results to identify matches to the organization’s requirements. Not only do chatbots speed up the hiring process, they also improve the candidate experience by providing quick confirmation and feedback on candidates’ applications.

Virtual reality/skills assessments

Through AI, machine learning and implementing VR platforms, organizations can better assess how candidates will respond in practical on-the-job settings — ultimately giving employers a more realistic idea of a candidate’s on-the-job performance before making a positive hiring decision.

Having trouble keeping up with evolving recruitment trends? Leave your talent search to the pros. Contact Roevin for assistance on all your engineering and IT recruitment needs!

Lēad Blog is part of Adecco and Roevin Canada. Hire your perfect team, or get more staffing advice from our experts.

Mental Health and the Workplace

The average professional spends 90,000 hours at work within their lifetime. With such a substantial portion of lives spent at work, employers need to be cognizant of how the workplace can trigger mental health issues, and in response, focus on creating an environment that fosters strong mental health amongst their workforce.

Mental health and our role in the workplace often co-exist. To many, their professional lives foster a social network and ensue a sense of purpose and accomplishment. However, being constantly connected through technology can make those 40-hour work weeks feel more like 24/7 — leaving little time to focus on self-health and self-help. Currently, 1 in 5 Canadians experience a mental health problem or illness each year.

As an employer, the benefits of promoting mental health awareness is twofold. Employees reap the benefits and your business profits do as well. When we think of lost time at work many relate it to physical injury or illness, but the reality is that 30% of disability claims are related to mental health problems. In Canada, the total cost of mental health problems and illnesses is $50 billion per year. Employees affected by mental health issues experience higher absence rates and decreased productivity, leaving companies with an increased turnover rate — making it hard to meet deadlines and achieve corporate goals.

Creating a foundation to support good mental health does not have to strain your business’ resources. It’s as simple as implementing specific strategies.

Identify and educate

Mental health illnesses are not always easily identifiable and can often be misinterpreted by individuals and companies.  An employee who frequently misses work, has decreased work performance and shows changes in their behaviour can often be tell-tale signs of a mental health illness.  In these cases, educating leaders on how to engage in conversations around mental health can help employees feel that they’re in a safe environment, open up about their issues and seek the appropriate support.

Resources and support

As an employer there are many ways to support an individual who may be facing a mental health illness.  To start, make educational tools on mental health issues available.  This could range from education materials to online self-assessments that are geared at helping individuals detect the signs and promote early intervention.  As well, providing benefit plans and compensation structure support such as therapy coverage and mental health days can provide employees with the resources to seek the help they need.

Action plans

Develop and implement policies and procedures to allow employees to feel safe to come forward and to breakdown any stigmas associated with psychological issues.  If a colleague exhibits signs of stress and anxiety, have an action plan in place to assist. Communicate without judgement, consider emotional triggers while being supportive and clear. Also, providing training for colleagues can help to erase the stigma around mental illnesses in your workplace.

Despite our best efforts in fostering a supportive work environment, mental health issues are not always preventable. A wide range of factors from biological to psychological to environmental can contribute to the development of mental illnesses. With so much time spent at work, employers need to focus on the signs and have resources readily available in order to help.

With a little effort, your workplace can have a large impact in maintaining the positive mental health of your workforce.

If you or anyone you know is in need, it’s important to seek the appropriate help. For information on the resources available throughout Canada visit mental health resources.