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Why an Internship Program?

Internships are more than a mandatory student requirement and experience on a resume. A well-managed internship program can bring significant benefits to an organization.  Here’s how your organization can reap the rewards.

  1. Fresh Perspectives

Student interns bring with them fresh ideas and perspectives that can have a great impact on a business. Recent grads are generally tech savvy and fluent with social media platforms — positioning them well to impact marketing strategies! To tap into your intern’s ideas and creativity, create an environment in which they feel comfortable so they are at ease to participate in meetings and brainstorm sessions.

  1. Brand Recognition

Good news travels fast.  Internship programs show potential job seekers and existing employees that your company believes in employee development.  These programs also shed light on positive corporate values to existing and new clients.  Adopting such a program and making it a positive experience, means that people will talk about your company to their network — setting your brand apart from other companies competing for similar talent and clients.

  1. Increased Productivity

Internship programs are a cost-effective solution to providing extra support staff members sometimes need. Interns lend great support with administrative tasks and other entry level projects, allowing employees to focus on higher level business tasks. This prevents existing employees from becoming over burdened with a high workload — while ultimately increasing productivity.

  1. Recruitment Tool

Internships are a great way to evaluate a potential candidate without the commitment of hiring them permanently. This year-round recruitment tool creates larger pools of talent to pull from, with workforce ready candidates. Should you decide to hire an intern, the result is a new employee who is fully trained and understands your business — allowing you to save costs on recruitment and training!

  1. Giving back to the community

Developing a well-managed internship is a great way to give back to the community and demonstrate that you value their support of your business. Not to mention, internship programs increase employment levels, enhance the local workforce and economy, and, assist graduates in developing professional skills. What better way to solidify a positive corporate culture that encapsulates social responsibility?

Need help implementing an internship program for your company? Contact Adecco Canada for resources and assistance, and start reaping the benefits of a well-managed internship today!


To view more of our blogs and articles, visit our Employer resources page on our website.

Staffing for Canada Week

Staffing for Canada Week is upon us once again. It’s an annual celebration that gives us the opportunity to recognize the many contributions of Canadians who are employed through staffing firms. At Adecco, we know that our outstanding temporary associates are the reason for our success, which is why we’re proud to give over 9,000 people a chance to work at great companies every week.

Here at Adecco, we recognize the valuable contributions that temporary workers make to our clients. Whether it’s providing support during peak periods of increased business or additional assistance to ensure projects meet their deadlines, temporary workers are often the unsung heroes of a business. So this week, we take a moment (and some blog space) to acknowledge the MVPs of the staffing world: temporary workers.

People make the difference

Talent is the multiplier. The more energy and attention you invest in it, the greater the yield.      – Marcus Buckingham, Author and Business Consultant

Good employees are a company’s greatest asset. Their hard work not only keeps a business alive, it helps the business thrive. After all, employees are the ones who know the business inside and out. We believe that recognizing our temporary employees for the contributions they make — not just during Staffing for Canada Week, but throughout the year — helps empower workers to truly make a difference within their organizations

How we value our associates

How do we show this appreciation for our temporary associates? It’s simple. We treat all our associates like the top candidates we know they are. This includes a competitive compensation and benefits package, which enables our associates to take control of their careers, while providing them with the flexibility to find the right position, hours and wages to fit their lifestyle. But it also includes the small things — follow-up calls and reward programs show our appreciation throughout the year.

Consider temporary work

Looking to rejoin the workforce or get a foot in the door? Want to work for great companies with the flexibility to be selective about your next job? Then temporary assignments might be for you! With temporary work, our associates can take advantage of the high levels of personal flexibility and the opportunity to try on various hats to develop transferable skills that short-term assignments offer. Plus, they get to pick the right position that enhances their professional and personal lives.

This week, as we celebrate the contributions temporary associates make to Canadian businesses, join Adecco in saying: Thank you!

To view more of our blogs and articles, visit our Employment resources page on our website.


 

Can I do more?

By:  Camillo Zacchia, Ph.D. – Psychologist

In this guest post, clinical psychologist Dr. Camillo Zacchia looks at the tendency to question whether we’re doing enough. He looks at the personality types that can get derailed by these feelings of inadequacy and offers a way forward when confronted by the sense that you’re not doing enough. Read on for Dr. Zacchia’s article on the art of good enough.

Can I do more? This question is a trap if I ever heard one.

Can I do more to help my parents? Can I do a better job on this assignment? Can I eat better? These types of questions are endless and the only answer to them is yes. The simple fact is we can always do more or do better. This means that in order to stop working on something, we have to accept this fact and just “be OK” with it. In other words, we have to accept that good enough is good enough.

But what happens to people who can’t be satisfied with good enough? Those who are unable to accept this option are going to be in trouble. The question of “can I do more?” will leave them with only two other options. The first is to be disappointed with not doing their best and the second is to try harder and keep going. But if they try harder, they are still left with the question of “can I do more?” and they’re right back to the same two options of trying harder or being disappointed. There is no alternative. For them, all roads eventually lead to disappointment.

Of course, this isn’t a big issue for most of us. The majority of people can live with good enough. They acknowledge that they can do better — after all, nobody’s perfect — but can nevertheless be satisfied with what they’ve done. No disappointment for these people. But there are others who have a much harder time letting go, and for them the question of “can I do more?” will cause significant problems and often lead to feelings of burnout. There are two groups of people who have particular difficulty letting things stand.

The perfectionists
Some people just can’t seem to be happy until things are just right: a job that seems well done still needs refining, a good meal still needs a little something, nothing feels quite good enough. These people can sometimes be seen as perfectionists, or as picky. There is no denying the fact that their work is generally very high quality. The only problem is that they are rarely satisfied with it, even if everyone else around them is.

The guilt-ridden
There is another group of individuals who are governed by excessive guilt. They are generally seen as people pleasers and are constantly doing for others. This can include trying to please bosses, coworkers, friends or members of the family. Many of them may have grown up in a home with a parent who was difficult to please or who was needy, dependent and required lots of attention and help. Since everyone around them always has needs, the guilt-ridden can’t stop. To do so would mean to disappoint others and it just isn’t in their nature to let others down.

For the perfectionist and guilt-ridden people, the question of “can I do more?” is a trap. The answer will always be yes. As a result, they will keep pushing for more and will almost always overdo things, potentially leading to burnout or complete avoidance of people or responsibilities. It’s just too much work, so they often run away and simply stop trying.

This is the self-fulfilling prophecy we often see in such people. Even though they always do very well in both quantity and quality, at some point they know it won’t be good enough so they just give up. Ironically, it confirms their belief that they aren’t “good enough” because now they really are getting nothing done.

For those who aren’t very good at letting go, the only way around this bottomless pit of disappointment is to be aware of the trap that comes with the question “can I do more?” A far more functional question is “did I do a lot?” Just look at how your raw performance numbers or indicators stack up to others in your position. Do you treat as many dossiers as your co-workers? Do you do as much for your parents as your siblings? The answer to “did I do a lot?’ is usually also yes. But at least answering yes to this question does not require you to do more.

When we know in our logical minds that we did a lot — probably more than most others would — then we have to force ourselves to stop. This may make us uncomfortable at first but like all emotions, they fade over time. If we give in to these feelings, they will strengthen. If we don’t act on them, and allow them to dissipate naturally, they will get weaker and weaker over time.

The idea of things being good but not quite good enough may make you feel uncomfortable at first but by not giving in to your urges to do more, you will eventually feel that things really are just that…good enough.

To view more of our blogs and articles, visit our Employment resources page on our website.


Dr. Zacchia[1] is a clinical psychologist specializing in the treatment of anxiety disorders, depression and interpersonal problems. He blogs at Psychospeak with Dr. Z[2] and the Huffington Post Canada: The Ilk of Humankind[3].

Editor’s Note: A previous version of this post appeared on Psychospeak with Dr. Z.[4] It has been updated to provide additional details.

Stay tuned for more from Dr. Zacchia as he looks at mental health in the workplace.

[1] www.drzacchia.com

[2] http://blog.douglas.qc.ca/psychospeak/

[3] https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/author/camillo-zacchia-phd/

[4] http://blog.douglas.qc.ca/psychospeak/2015/07/07/can-i-do-more/

IT is where it’s AT

In the years Michael Fernandes has spent working and recruiting in the IT vertical, Roevin’s resident 360 IT Recruitment Consultant has worked with many talented individuals and organizations throughout Canada. Having successfully navigated through multiple market shifts, Michael is an expert on recruitment in the IT sector. In this guest post, he shares some of this knowledge by highlighting the top areas for career growth in the IT field and the skill sets that will help you succeed there.

  1. UX/UI design

User experience (UX) and user interface (UI) design focuses on creating useful, usable and delightful products and features that enhance a user’s interaction with the product. As companies pivot to customer-savvy, design-focused strategies, the ability to make products ‘user friendly’ to facilitate a better user experience is a valuable skill set, especially when many developers and designers can find it difficult to incorporate these elements in their products. Recently, we have seen an influx of candidates with UX and UI design skills, as well as many individuals successfully turning their knowledge into standalone positions such as UX Designers, UI Designers, Information Architects and Usability Specialists.

  1. Security

In recent years, information security and privacy has been a huge issue for individuals and corporations alike. From identity theft of individuals to large-scale corporate data breaches and data mining scandals, stakeholders are increasingly prioritizing security. In response, we have seen the emergence of certifications that enable individuals to hone their cyber security skills, including the Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) and Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) credentials.

  1. Cloud computing

With the evolution of IT, storage has always been an issue as companies look for ways to reduce their costs and save space in their databases and servers. Many organizations have been transitioning to cloud-based solutions, employing Software as a Service (SaaS), Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) and Platform as a Service (PaaS) solutions as well as virtualization to reduce the costs of maintaining and supporting business operations. Among our clients, we have seen a large push towards using services such as Microsoft Hyper-V, Amazon Web Services (AWS) and VMWare for private cloud hosting, which has increased their demand for talent that has experience in integrating and migrating to cloud-based solutions.

  1. Programming

With growing digitalization initiatives, programming has become a definite skill to have in recent years. Most organizations want to land a “one-stop” resource, looking for people who can code in more than one language to diversify proposed solutions. In our experience, the top languages we see organizations recruit for are JavaScript, Python and .NET. And, as mobile development continues to grow, we also see organizations look for talented coders with experience in Java, Objective-C and HTML5. The most striking trend I’ve seen is the expansion of development skills to roles outside the development team. Many marketing departments, for example, now include front end developers with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript experience to manage their websites.

  1. Soft skills

Of course, we can’t forget the following perennial soft skills: eagerness to learn, willingness to persevere in a role, ability to effectively communicate and collaborate with teams, and the ability to troubleshoot issues. These skills are not as easily taught as technical skills, yet they are vital for workers in the IT sector.

The need for qualified IT talent is high. Expanding your knowledge base to include the skills mentioned above is likely to secure your next job in these growing career areas.

 

BIO – Michael Fernandes has demonstrated success in the sales, talent acquisition and technology solutions industries. A certified Scrum Master and PMI member, he is dedicated to transforming individuals into energetic team members working productively. Michael is a recruitment expert and account executive at Roevin (https://www.roevin.ca/).

 

 


To view more of our blogs and articles, visit our Employer resources page on our website.

And now for a message from our Canadian Win4Youth Ambassadors!

The Win4Youth program brings The Adecco Group employees, associates and clients together to share their passion for sport and to have a positive impact on the lives of young people around the world.  At the end of October, we’re excited to have 2 members of our Adecco Group family join 70 colleagues from around the world at the first ever Win4Youth Triathlon, powered by Oceanlava, in Lanzarote, Spain.

Anne Nguyen and Christian Robert are Canada’s representatives on the North American team. They were selected for their passion for Win4Youth, social media and fundraising efforts, and their dedication to The Adecco Group core values. Below, Anne and Christian tell us about their individual journeys to become Win4Youth ambassadors.

Anne Nguyen

What initially enticed me to consider applying to become a Win4Youth Ambassador was the opportunity to travel to Europe and make connections within The Adecco Group globally. However, I didn’t think I would be able to do the activities it took to get selected, like organizing a fundraiser and increasing my social media presence. I also worried about completing the triathlon if I was selected.

As I mulled over my application, I spoke with a colleague who had triathlon experience. She helped me realize that I can do anything I put my mind to. It also didn’t hurt that I made it a goal at the beginning of 2018 to push myself out of my comfort zone.

A few days later, I realized I wanted it. I wanted to be Canada’s Win4Youth Ambassador. I wanted to be the ambassador that could motivate all the underdogs! So, I took the leap. I figured I had nothing to lose and everything to gain.

With the help and support of my manager, we started a competition between our Calgary and Edmonton branches to see which office could log the most kilometres in 5 days. Let me tell you, there’s nothing like the Battle of Alberta to light a fire under everyone. Not only did I succeed at getting mostly everyone to participate, I was able to fundraise and create awareness for my charity of choice, Believe in the Gold,[1] which raises funds for childhood cancer research and family support in Alberta.

Now as I begin to share my journey, I want people to realize that anything is possible. I want to be able to share all the highs and lows, and prove that self-doubt is nothing when you have an amazing support network behind you. My journey has only begun and I already feel so grateful for all the support I have received. I am so proud to be part of The Adecco Group Family and can’t wait to make you all proud! Please continue to follow my journey over these next few months and see me cross the finish line in Lanzarote, Spain in October.

Christian Robert

I have been running off and on for the last 20 years, and more regularly in the last year and a half. I even participated in a marathon in 2006 and have run a few 10K races and half marathons in recent years. But I’m far from an elite athlete; I’m especially not an experienced cyclist or swimmer. I even once told my avid triathlete brother-in-law that I would never do a triathlon. Too hard, too much training and engagement. Not for me.

Yet here I am, committed to my first Olympic triathlon in October. What happened? The easy answer is I lost my mind — but it’s a little more complicated than that.

In the last 18 months, I’ve been more committed to my training than ever before. I haven’t been training harder, necessarily, but I’ve been more consistent, focusing on my next run and striving to never miss a training session. It’s all thanks to the Win4Youth program, which got me started and keeps me motivated while I compete against my colleagues to log more kilometres than everyone else.

But, as I’ve learned about myself, I also need new challenges to keep me motivated. Otherwise, I get bored without a “mission” to accomplish and I slow down my training; running less often to the point where I have to start training all over again. Trying to maintain my ranking as one of the top 5 Canadian colleagues who has logged the most kilometres would only keep me motivated for so long. So, I registered for the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Half Marathon last fall and then for the Around the Bay Road Race in March. It worked. I kept training regularly.

But then what? If I didn’t have a project to concentrate on, I worried that my bad habit of losing motivation would resurface. And this time, I decided it would be different. I would continue training no matter what. There are just too many benefits! (Stay tuned for my thoughts on this topic!)

 “What keeps me going is goals.”

  • Muhammad Ali

My main objective was simple: continue exercising regularly. To do so, I had to find a new mission. Even though I was scared to admit it, the Win4Youth triathlon was the perfect project. It would take me out of my comfort zone, but still be exciting and motivating! I mean, travelling to Belgium and Lanzarote (have you see what it looks like?) and having all your colleagues cheering you on — that’s exciting! For me, the scary part is having to swim 1.5 km in the ocean, cycle 40 km and run 10 km, but if I train consistently, I know I can do it. Besides, now that I’ve found my “mission”, I’m fine.

So far, it’s working. I’m concentrating on preparing for training camp in Ghent, Belgium by focusing on swimming to improve my technique and endurance, and adding cycling to my routine.

I’ll strive to do as well as the previous Canadian ambassadors and make everyone proud. This is the beginning of a long journey. My goal: enjoy every minute of it. Stay tuned for more to come on my adventure.

This is the first in a series from our Win4Youth Ambassadors as they get ready for the Win4Youth Triathlon in Lanzarote, Spain. Read more about the program here.[2] And follow along on Facebook[3] and Twitter[4] with #Win4Youth.

To view more of our blogs and articles, visit our Employer resources page on our website.


[1] https://www.believeinthegold.com/

[2] http://www.win4youth.com/

[3] https://www.facebook.com/win4youth/

[4] https://twitter.com/Win4Youth

North American Occupational Safety and Health Week

#MentalHealthAwarenessWeek

With North American Occupational Safety and Health week upon us, it’s time to reflect on the measures we have in place to prevent injury and illness in the workplace, at home and in our community. By starting with strong health and safety practices at home, we can make safety a habit that will translate into a safer work environment for all employees.

In the staffing industry, it is said that people are our greatest asset. To ensure this, The Adecco Group believes in forming proper safety habits that translate both on and off the job. Whether you’re an associate, colleague, client or partner, the goal of NAOSH week is focusing on the importance of prevention and keeping you safe at home and in the workplace. 

– Jason Berman, The Adecco Group National Manager, Workers Compensation, Safety & Compliance –

A safe work environment is a right, not a privilege. To support this right, we should be careful not to take safety for granted, even when it’s regulated in the workplace. Forming good habits can help prevent workplace accidents and injuries, creating a safer workplace for all. Whether it’s physical, chemical or ergonomic safety, developing good habits in our personal lives will help make safety a priority in our professional lives.

Safety

From a young age, we are taught to look both ways before crossing the road, make sure our shoelaces are tied to avoid tripping, never leave a hot element unattended, etc. These same principles apply to the work environment. By practicing general safety at home, you are ensuring these preventative measures become second nature, helping you avoid these hazards on the work site.

Physical

Physical injury can be caused by improper lifting techniques, repetitive motions and unsafe machine handling. Away from work, we avoid these injuries and hazards by stretching before exercising, wearing supportive/proper footwear and taking breaks from repetitive tasks. At work, the same safety practices apply. Wearing proper PPE can help you avoid hazards, while proper lifting techniques and small breaks from repetitive motions will help prevent injuries.

Chemical

Depending on the industry, chemicals in the workplace can include cleaning supplies, and flammable and combustible substances. At home, we ensure cleaning supplies are properly labelled, stored separately from consumable items and kept out of reach of children. These same tactics apply in the work environment. In addition, employers should ensure all staff complete WHMIS and MSDS training.

Stress

Since work is acknowledged as the main source of stress for 62% of Canadian workers, learning to prevent stressors at work is a good practice for all of us.[i] One way to do this is by utilizing the same tactics we use in our personal lives — whether it’s paying bills or doing household chores, we can use organization, task prioritization and responsibility delegation to deal with our stress. If that fails, talk it through with a colleague or manager. They may have additional ideas about how to address your concerns, plus the conversation itself may be just the cure.

Ergonomic

Ergonomic injuries are common for office workers due to the sedentary nature of their jobs. Away from work, we have greater control over ergonomic injuries, with the ability to limit our time standing, looking at television or computer screens, and performing other repetitive motions. With nearly 2 million Canadians suffering from RSI (repetitive strain injuries)[ii], ergonomic controls should be a priority. Workers are entitled to ergonomic mats for standing, as well as ergonomic chairs, keyboards and even standing desks.

Although safety at home can translate into good safety practices at work, there are additional considerations both employees and employers should keep in mind to ensure a safe and healthy work environment.

How employees can maintain safety habits at work:

  • Be mindful of your surroundings.
  • Follow set safety rules and procedures.
  • Always wear recommended or required PPE.
  • Take breaks to avoid strain.
  • Report any unsafe work conditions.

How employers can maintain safety habits at work:

  • Promote NAOSH Week within your company.
  • Revise and/or launch new safety programs.
  • Provide incentives for reporting potential safety hazards.
  • Build a Joint Health and Safety Committee and hold regular meetings.
  • Maintain proper injury reporting.

Regardless of the size of your company or the nature of your business, workplace safety must always be a priority. By implementing safety practices at home, we are creating positive habits that will translate into better workplace safety, instilling practices that will benefit the health and safety of colleagues, management and customers alike.

To view more of our blogs and articles, visit our Employer resources page on our website.


[i] http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/11-627-m/contest/finalists-finalistes_2-eng.htm

[ii] https://www.mun.ca/safetynet/library/OHandS/SafetyNetOfficeErgonomics.pdf