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Posts tagged ‘youth employment’

Interested in Adecco Canada’s CEO for One Month Program in 2019? Here’s what you need to know!

by Olivia Poulin, 2018 CEO One Month

Adecco Canada #CEO1Month Olivia Poulin shares her advice for what to expect from the CEO for One Month program.

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Why Temporary Jobs Are Great For Students This Summer

#TempEmployment

As summer approaches, students across the country are gearing up for the summer job hunt, looking for short term employment to cover increasing costs of living, tuition etc. If this sounds like you, don’t overlook temporary work, which offers many benefits when you’re looking to make some extra money this summer.

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Why an Internship Program?

Internships are more than a mandatory student requirement and experience on a resume. A well-managed internship program can bring significant benefits to an organization.  Here’s how your organization can reap the rewards.

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Canada’s Labour Force Survey, September 2017

Released at 8:30 a.m. Eastern time in The Daily, Friday, October 6, 2017

Employment was essentially unchanged in September (+10,000 or +0.1%). The unemployment rate remained at 6.2%, matching the low of October 2008. Gains in full-time employment (+112,000) in September were mostly offset by declines in part time (-102,000). In August, there was a decline in the number of people working full time and an increase in part time. In the 12 months to September, employment rose by 320,000 (+1.8%), spurred by gains in full-time employment (+289,000 or +2.0%). Over this period, the number of hours worked increased by 2.4%. Overall employment grew by 43,000 (+0.2%) in the third quarter, slower than the 0.6% growth rate in the second quarter and the 0.5% growth rate of the first quarter of 2017.

Chart 1 – Employment

Chart 2 – Unemployment Rate

Highlights
From August to September, employment increased for people aged 55 and older, while it fell among men aged 25 to 54. For the second consecutive month, Ontario was the lone province with a notable employment gain. There were employment declines in Manitoba and Prince Edward Island. More people worked in educational services as well as wholesale and retail trade in September, while employment fell in information, culture and recreation. There was additional employment in the public sector, while the number of private sector employees was little changed. At the same time, the number of self-employed workers held steady.

More People Aged 55 and Older Working
Employment rose by 25,000 in September for people aged 55 and older, mostly in full-time work. Their unemployment rate was little changed at 5.4%. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment for people aged 55 and older increased by 131,000 (+3.4%). Among workers aged 55 and older, about 8 in 10 are between the ages of 55 and 64. The estimated year-over-year employment growth rate (unadjusted for seasonality) for 55- to- 64-year-olds was 2.6% in September and their population increased by 2.0%. While population growth was similar for men and women in this age group, employment grew at a faster pace for women (+3.5%) than for men (+1.8%). In comparison, people aged 65 and older comprised a smaller share of older workers, but had the fastest year-over-year employment growth rate (unadjusted for seasonality) among the major demographic groups in September, rising 9.1% and outpacing their rate of population growth (+3.7%). Among this group of workers, employment grew at a faster pace for men (+12.4%) than for women (+4.5%). For more information about recent trends among older workers, see “The impact of aging on labour market participation rates.”

Employment Declines Among Men aged 25 to 54
For men aged 25 to 54, employment declined by 29,000 in September—all in part-time work. The unemployment rate for men in this age group rose by 0.4 percentage points to 5.9%. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment for men aged 25 to 54 increased by 72,000 (+1.2%). Among women aged 25 to 54, full-time employment increased by 39,000 in September, while part time fell by 26,000, leaving overall employment for this group little changed. Their unemployment rate was 5.2%. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment among core aged women rose by 102,000 (+1.8%).

Youth Unemployment Rate Down
Overall youth employment was little changed in September a 37,000 increase in full-time work was mostly offset by part-time losses. Employment for 15- to 24 year-olds was relatively unchanged compared with 12 months earlier. The unemployment rate for youth has been on a downward trend since the start of 2017 and fell 1.2 percentage points to 10.3% in September. This was the lowest rate since comparable data became available in 1976. See Chart 8 in the Labour Force Information \ publication. The decline in the youth unemployment rate in September was due to fewer youths in the labour market. The participation rate for this group fell 0.7 percentage points to 62.7% in the month. At the same time, their rate of full-time school attendance was 56.4%—the highest rate for any September since 2011. Increased school attendance is associated with delayed labour market participation. For more information about this long-term trend, see the Canada 150 box “Evolution of youth in the labour market.”

Provincial Employment
In Ontario, employment rose by 35,000 in September, the fourth overall gain in five months. An increase of 78,000 in full-time employment was partly offset by a decline of 43,000 in part-time work. The overall employment increase in September was driven by gains in wholesale and retail trade as well as educational services. The unemployment rate was little changed at 5.6% in September. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment in Ontario was up 170,000 (+2.4%). Employment in Manitoba declined by 5,500 in September, almost all in part-time work. This was the first notable overall employment decrease in the province since April 2016. Despite the monthly decline, employment in Manitoba has been on an upward trend since the end of 2016. In September, the unemployment rate increased by 0.6 percentage points to 5.5%. In September, employment decreased in Prince Edward Island (-700), the second decline in three months. Despite the recent decreases, employment in the province was up by 1,600 (+2.2%) compared with September 2016. The unemployment rate increased by 0.7 percentage points in September to 9.5%. Overall employment in Quebec was little changed for the third consecutive month. In September, a decline of 25,000 in part-time work was mostly offset by additional people working full time. In the 12 months to September, employment in the province rose by 54,000 (+1.3%), concentrated in full-time work. Over the same 12 month period, the unemployment rate fell by 0.9 percentage points to 6.0%.

Industry Perspective
The number of people working in educational services increased by 20,000 in September, primarily in Ontario and Quebec. Employment in the industry was similar to the level observed in September 2016. Employment in wholesale and retail trade rose by 17,000 in September, bringing gains to 99,000 (+3.6%) since September 2016. Employment in information, culture and recreation decreased by 24,000 in September. On a year-over-year basis, employment in the industry edged down by 20,000 (-2.5%). Public sector employment rose by 26,000 in September, while the number of private sector employees was little changed. Compared with 12 months earlier, the number of private sector employees increased by 162,000 (+1.4%) and public sector employment rose by 103,000 (+2.8%). The number of self-employed workers held steady in September, with year-over-year gains totaling 55,000 (+2.0%).

Quarterly Update for the Territories
The Labour Force Survey collects labour market data in the territories, produced in the form of three-month moving averages.In the third quarter of 2017, employment in Yukon was little changed compared with the second quarter, and the unemployment rate was relatively unchanged at 3.3%. In the Northwest Territories, employment in the third quarter was unchanged from the previous quarter. Over the same period, the unemployment rate was little changed at 7.0%. Employment in Nunavut held steady in the third quarter, while the unemployment rate was 14.9%.

Source: Statistics Canada

ACSESS CHAMPION: ADECCO Canada Adecco Canada opens the doors of power to support future leaders

Article by ACSESS Canada

It took a leap of faith for Gilbert Boileau, President of Adecco Canada, to swing open the doors of his office for a month.

That’s exactly what he did. In June, Gilbert invited Alana Couvrette, (pictured above with Gilbert) a 22-year-old student studying public administration and political science at the University of Ottawa, to job shadow him, as part of his company’s CEO for One Month program. As part of the process, she would also share her journey along the way on social media.

Boileau is big believer in giving everyone at all levels a chance to excel but had some reservations. “I questioned how it would come together, yet was intrigued to see the outcome. I would need to allow someone in ‘my bubble,’” explains Gilbert, “but for the program to work effectively, Alana needed to be able to shadow me as I carried out my day. Her job shadowing covered everything, including confidential meetings with other colleagues, events and client meetings. You name it. In the end it was a huge success and I would sincerely recommend it to any CEO.”

This experience was also enlightening for Gilbert. “It was so interesting to share my experience with a young person and fascinating to see things through Alana’s eyes. It forces you to think about things you haven’t considered in years. She is impressive on so many levels. Her energy and enthusiasm was felt by the many teams. Armed with her political background, she was inquisitive, probing and asked me some tough questions. I had to explain so many things to Alana because she has very little background in our industry. It made me reflect on the way I do things…”

Alana was chosen from more than 2,300 applicants to become Adecco Canada’s first ever CEO for One Month, a global program that is part of the company’s Way To Work initiative. Gilbert’s passion for the program and willingness to participate sparked after hearing the global CEO for One Month speak at an international company conference.

“This program is positioning us as an industry leader in attracting the next generation of leaders with our flexible, open and inclusive work environment,” says Christine Marinho, Adecco Canada’s Director of Marketing for The Adecco Group in Canada. “The Millennials represent 37 per cent of the Canadian workforce with 28 per cent of them in managerial roles. The Baby Boom generation is transitioning out of the workforce and we want to foster a supportive environment where we develop leadership talents, encourage the sharing of ideas and provide mentorship at all levels. Our CEO for One Month program allows us to ‘walk the walk’ and provide access to one exceptional leader who will share their experience in real-time with employees and potential candidates via social media.”

What was it like for Alana to be given this extraordinary opportunity?

“It was overwhelming and inspiring in every possible way. I never realized you could get so much done with so little sleep,” she says jokingly. “Yet, I would wake up every morning, excited to be able to do it all again. I had no idea what a CEO does and I wasn’t very familiar with the staffing and employment industry. I’ve had a total of five jobs in my life and now I was working with the CEO.” Watch one of Alana’s Day in the Life video updates.

She and Gilbert instantly clicked. “He treated me as an equal, as we leapt head first into his jam-packed schedule, where we met with amazing Adecco clients, discussed their needs and worked with employees from every function across the organization. Everyone was so committed and excited.”

Alana found Adecco employees to be very special. “They are ‘people’, people, so warm and welcoming. I really enjoyed travelling to meet with clients at their offices and learning about the services Adecco offers. I saw firsthand how fascinating the staffing industry is and how much Adecco cares for its clients and candidates. There are so many myths about the industry. I was in so many meetings about placing candidates and I saw how hard they work to get candidates the best benefits and compensation.”

Some of Gilbert and Alana’s favourite moments were driving to client meetings together and discussing industry issues. It’s where they discovered how the generational divide sparks great debate and fosters understanding. “Both Gilbert and I like to be challenged, to be proven wrong and be shown the faults in our reasoning,” says Alana. “It made for many lively conversations between the two of us. He has a fascinating background and it’s rare for me to have the full attention of someone with his experience. I think we pushed each other to see the world from each other’s eyes.” Alana shares her thoughts on how Millennials and Baby Boomers can help each other enhance their leadership skills in this blog post

Adds Gilbert: “I enjoyed our debates. I think it’s so important for Alana to not only challenge me, but everyone she is working with. There were some interesting debates and I am glad I created a haven for her to share her insights, which was eye opening for us both. This program is meant to benefit Alana but I learned so much as well. It’s not often that you get the opportunity to have someone sitting beside you and observing how you work. She helped me see myself in a different angle, from the viewpoint of someone looking from the outside in.”

What’s next for Alana now that’s she’s helped lead the Canadian group of a multi-million dollar organization for one month? She is being considered along with 48 finalists from around the world for the honour of acting as Adecco’s Global CEO for One Month, shadowing Alain Dehaze, The Adecco Group’s Global CEO. The Global CEO for One Month selected will also receive a salary of 15,000 Euros. You can help Alana achieve her dream of becoming Adecco’s global CEO FOR ONE MONTH. Anyone can rate the candidates.

“I am so proud of Alana,” says Gilbert. “She was thrown in the water and swam so impressively. She had more of a theoretical view of the business world and she was able to see it in practice. It was amazing how poised she was considering everything she went through, meeting so many different stakeholders and engaging in real world discussions. To be able to work with the CEO at a macro level, at her age, is remarkable.”

 

The original article was written by Acsess Canada and can be seen on their website: Click here

As the national voice of recruiting, employment and staffing services industry, the Association of Canadian Search, Employment & Staffing Services (ACSESS) leads Canada to work. ACSESS advances best practices and ethical standards for the staffing industry through advocacy, government relations, professional development, resources and research.

Millennials Want More… Corporate Social Responsibility!

By CEO for One Month, Alana Couvrette

Millennials sometimes seem to get a bad rep as a narcissistic, entitled and self-centered generation. But is this fair to say? I don’ t think so…

For example, millennials expect more from their employers than a paycheck. They have a genuine desire to give back to communities, near and far. For them, purposeful work and the ability to create a positive impact take precedence on profit and salary. In fact, in a recent survey, it was revealed that 45% of student about to enter the workforce would even take a pay cut “for a job that makes a social or environmental impact.” They seek to work for organizations who enshrine good values and ethics into their business model.

Organizations, like Adecco, have taken note of this trend. They know that having an organization-wide aspiration to making a positive difference is part of their value-proposition for attracting and retaining the millennial talent pool.
However, trumpeting your values and ethics isn’t enough. You can’t just talk the talk… The young talent pool is eager to roll up their sleeves, get their hands dirty and participate in the efforts to improve communities near and dear to them. Organizations need to be able to offer opportunities for employees to truly engage in the change that they wish to make. Millennials seek diverse volunteerism opportunities.

At Adecco, our core values-passion, entrepreneurship, team spirit, responsibility and customer focus- permeate the whole business. As Adecco Canada’s CEO for One Month, I noticed this right away and can testify to their relevancy in our work. These values are also conveyed through our global employee engagement program, Win4Youth. This program encourages participants to clock up kilometers (through cycling, swimming or running) which are turned into donations to help disadvantaged youngsters find employment.

On June 22nd, 2017, Adecco Canada hosted their annual Solidarity Day, a day dedicated to Win4Youth. We spent the afternoon as a team running around Toronto completing a scavenger hunt filled with wacky photo ops and funny tasks. Maybe it’s just me but I didn’t even notice that we each accumulated around 9 kilometers. Multiply that by the total number of employees in the office and you’ve got a healthy donation! Curious to know how the day went? Watch this short video I made!

Still think millennials are self-centered? Deloitte’s Millennial Survey found that 7,800 young leaders from 29 different countries believe that the business world is getting it wrong. Close to 75% say that they feel businesses are “focused on their own agendas rather than improving society.”

Who’s looking self-centered now?

[1] https://www.forbes.com/sites/jeannemeister/2012/06/07/the-future-of-work-corporate-social-responsiblity-attracts-top-talent/#39aca2c33f95

[1] https://www.fastcompany.com/3046989/what-millennial-employees-really-want