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Posts tagged ‘job success’

Persistence and You

By Andrea Mancini, Adecco Canada National Account Executive


Success is all about persistence and doing the right thing for the long term.
-Bruce Rauner

 

In a world where it often feels like all your problems could be solved with one app click, I have found that the formula for success requires more effort and good old-fashioned persistence. Any successful sales champion will tell you that they did not reach the top of their game by hoping for success to knock at their door. Instead, they’ll probably tell you that sales success requires patience, confidence and grit–all qualities that are part of being persistent.

You either have what it takes to make it in sales or you don’t. Why? Because sales requires you to face yourself and your brand every single day—a difficult task when your brand is intangible. Sales also draws on your own innate characteristics. However, while you cannot “teach” sales, you can develop your innate skills and combine it with a positive, persistent attitude, to become a sales champion that is resistant to any economic conditions.

Here’s how:

Don’t take it personally
You will hear “no” many times in your pursuit to be a sales champion. The key is to hear it, acknowledge it politely, and remember, it’s not personal. The receiver is not saying “no” to you, they’re just saying “no, not now.” And there could be many reasons why they’ve responded this way. Your job is to persist and find out; why not now. It could be because you haven’t given them a reason to say yes.

Knowledge is power
Understanding a prospective client is fundamental to being able to present them with something they’ll want to say “yes” to. Be persistent and thorough when approaching a sales lead or prospect. Your job is to explore and understand who they are even before you get your foot in the door. What are their objectives, what is new in their world, why would they want to talk to you and allow you in their space?

So what?
With the rise of customer sophistication combined with all of your competitors knocking on your client’s door, you need to give them a reason to let you in. You need to persuasively present a compelling value proposition that demonstrates that you understand how you can add value and make it easier for the buyer. Otherwise, you’ll be faced with a literal or figurative “so what?” Until you can answer that question, be persistent.
A useful exercise is to refer back to how you buy. Take the example of buying new shoes. If you go into the shoe store knowing that you need running shoes, but the salesperson keeps showing you a hiking boot, they can describe its benefits all they want—that it’s on sale, made of good quality leather, how fashionable it is—but all you want is someone to point you to the best running shoes, at the best price, so you can run that 5k. Know what your buyer is buying and you’ll be able to anticipate and meet their expectations.

Be Authentic
We all know that buyers buy from people they trust. And the way you build trust is to be persistent in communicating your interest in helping your buyer, have the knowledge to back it up, and be yourself. Posturing, “sucking up”, or “buying” your client may work in the short-term, but you may suffer negative consequences in the long-term. Trust your abilities and your main objective to help your client and everything will eventually fall into place..

Grit with a cherry on top
Don’t underestimate the delicate balance of being persistent while remaining kind and professional. In my early years of selling, when I asked my prospects why they agreed to meet with me, they would affectionately comment that it was because “ you wouldn’t stop calling.” I took that as a semi-compliment, interpreting it as: “ you were persistent but not pushy, and I don’t know why but I like you, so now what are you going to do for me?” The art of not being pushy but still commanding attention comes from practice and the confidence that you have done your homework, you know why you want to sell something to a prospect, and, you love the chase!

Persistence is achieved by having an unwavering faith that your efforts are going to translate into a win one day. This requires patience, confidence, and a support system you trust. The process will require practice and possibly even reinvention, but if you stay positive and remain persistent, your goals will be within reach. Happy winning!

 

As a National Account Executive for Adecco Canada, Andrea Mancini’s primary focus is sales and contract negotiation for medium and large sized organizations. Her diverse background in the staffing industry has positioned her to create holistic solutions for her clients. Her many roles include Recruitment Management, Business Development, Field Manager, and National Sales. For over 10 years, Andrea has created long lasting client relationships by helping companies in the changing world of work. Many of her solutions have included implementing successful Master Vendor programs, creative Permanent Placement initiatives, and Large Volume solutions for employers of choice.  As a result, Andrea is a three-time recipient of prestigious sales awards in the staffing industry.

Andrea holds an Honours B.A. in Media Communications from Brock University.

How to make a good first impression in a new job

We’ve all heard the old adage that you will never get a second chance to make a first impression. When you’re starting at a new job, it’s even more vital that the impression be a positive one.

When you set off at a new workplace – whether it’s at a manufacturing plant or a Fortune 500 firm – there are always new names to learn, new processes to understand, new technologies to master and new teams to work with. On top of all the novelty, there is added pressure to impress your boss, forge relationships with coworkers and pass the probationary period. Every workplace is different and job expectations vary from employer to employer, but there are good judgments you can exhibit to ensure you get off on the right foot no matter what your role, including:

  • Arrive on time and work full days
  • Introduce yourself to everyone you meet
  • Have a positive attitude and open body language
  • Dress professionally and appropriately for your new position
  • Ask questions, take notes and seek training
  • Take initiative and prioritize tasks
  • Respect company time
  • Proofread your emails
  • Keep your desk area tidy and observe kitchen etiquette.

Along with the common sense behaviors listed above, there are also steps you can take to not only make a good first impression, but also excel in your new role!

Michael D. Watkins — author of  The First 90 Days: Proven Strategies for Getting Up to Speed Faster and Smarter — spoke to Forbes about impressing managers and colleagues during the crucial first 3 months of a new role. Book: The First 90 Days

Watkins recommends that you place as much emphasis on building relationships with coworkers and managers as you do focusing on technical job skills. Networking across departments and roles will help you fit into the company culture, find a mentor and connect with people who can help you as you’re learning the ropes. It will also give you a head start on forming lasting and beneficial work relationships.

Some of Watkins’ other important suggestions are:

  • Do not brag about your accomplishments at your past company.
  • Build trust by delivering on your commitments.
  • Consider temporarily rearranging your work-life balance while you prove yourself and gain speed.
  • Know your weaknesses and try to strengthen them through training. Offer a skills exchange to someone who can teach you.
  • Prioritize the tasks that will let you succeed in the job, not necessarily the ones you like to do the most.
  • Work within your boss’s managerial style and expectations – especially in the first 3 months. Communicate honestly and frequently. Ask him or her for advice when needed. If a problem arises, approach your boss early and be prepared with solutions.
  • Be flexible and adaptable. Your skills and ways of doing things from your past role may not be what is needed for success in the new position.
  • Try and secure “an early win”. Take on a project which you can lead or be heavily involved in. Include and learn from the relevant stakeholders. Try to make demonstrable improvements or success in the project within your first 90 days.

First impressions are essential and can often be lasting. A good impression can lead to a thriving career, whereas bad impressions may unintentionally make your new role harder and keep you from future opportunities. The mindful steps above will help build a good rapport with colleagues and gain respect from mangers as you undoubtedly become more comfortable and confident in your new position.