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Posts tagged ‘employee motivation’

Can I do more?

By:  Camillo Zacchia, Ph.D. – Psychologist

In this guest post, clinical psychologist Dr. Camillo Zacchia looks at the tendency to question whether we’re doing enough. He looks at the personality types that can get derailed by these feelings of inadequacy and offers a way forward when confronted by the sense that you’re not doing enough. Read on for Dr. Zacchia’s article on the art of good enough.

Can I do more? This question is a trap if I ever heard one.

Can I do more to help my parents? Can I do a better job on this assignment? Can I eat better? These types of questions are endless and the only answer to them is yes. The simple fact is we can always do more or do better. This means that in order to stop working on something, we have to accept this fact and just “be OK” with it. In other words, we have to accept that good enough is good enough.

But what happens to people who can’t be satisfied with good enough? Those who are unable to accept this option are going to be in trouble. The question of “can I do more?” will leave them with only two other options. The first is to be disappointed with not doing their best and the second is to try harder and keep going. But if they try harder, they are still left with the question of “can I do more?” and they’re right back to the same two options of trying harder or being disappointed. There is no alternative. For them, all roads eventually lead to disappointment.

Of course, this isn’t a big issue for most of us. The majority of people can live with good enough. They acknowledge that they can do better — after all, nobody’s perfect — but can nevertheless be satisfied with what they’ve done. No disappointment for these people. But there are others who have a much harder time letting go, and for them the question of “can I do more?” will cause significant problems and often lead to feelings of burnout. There are two groups of people who have particular difficulty letting things stand.

The perfectionists
Some people just can’t seem to be happy until things are just right: a job that seems well done still needs refining, a good meal still needs a little something, nothing feels quite good enough. These people can sometimes be seen as perfectionists, or as picky. There is no denying the fact that their work is generally very high quality. The only problem is that they are rarely satisfied with it, even if everyone else around them is.

The guilt-ridden
There is another group of individuals who are governed by excessive guilt. They are generally seen as people pleasers and are constantly doing for others. This can include trying to please bosses, coworkers, friends or members of the family. Many of them may have grown up in a home with a parent who was difficult to please or who was needy, dependent and required lots of attention and help. Since everyone around them always has needs, the guilt-ridden can’t stop. To do so would mean to disappoint others and it just isn’t in their nature to let others down.

For the perfectionist and guilt-ridden people, the question of “can I do more?” is a trap. The answer will always be yes. As a result, they will keep pushing for more and will almost always overdo things, potentially leading to burnout or complete avoidance of people or responsibilities. It’s just too much work, so they often run away and simply stop trying.

This is the self-fulfilling prophecy we often see in such people. Even though they always do very well in both quantity and quality, at some point they know it won’t be good enough so they just give up. Ironically, it confirms their belief that they aren’t “good enough” because now they really are getting nothing done.

For those who aren’t very good at letting go, the only way around this bottomless pit of disappointment is to be aware of the trap that comes with the question “can I do more?” A far more functional question is “did I do a lot?” Just look at how your raw performance numbers or indicators stack up to others in your position. Do you treat as many dossiers as your co-workers? Do you do as much for your parents as your siblings? The answer to “did I do a lot?’ is usually also yes. But at least answering yes to this question does not require you to do more.

When we know in our logical minds that we did a lot — probably more than most others would — then we have to force ourselves to stop. This may make us uncomfortable at first but like all emotions, they fade over time. If we give in to these feelings, they will strengthen. If we don’t act on them, and allow them to dissipate naturally, they will get weaker and weaker over time.

The idea of things being good but not quite good enough may make you feel uncomfortable at first but by not giving in to your urges to do more, you will eventually feel that things really are just that…good enough.

To view more of our blogs and articles, visit our Employment resources page on our website.


Dr. Zacchia[1] is a clinical psychologist specializing in the treatment of anxiety disorders, depression and interpersonal problems. He blogs at Psychospeak with Dr. Z[2] and the Huffington Post Canada: The Ilk of Humankind[3].

Editor’s Note: A previous version of this post appeared on Psychospeak with Dr. Z.[4] It has been updated to provide additional details.

Stay tuned for more from Dr. Zacchia as he looks at mental health in the workplace.

[1] www.drzacchia.com

[2] http://blog.douglas.qc.ca/psychospeak/

[3] https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/author/camillo-zacchia-phd/

[4] http://blog.douglas.qc.ca/psychospeak/2015/07/07/can-i-do-more/

And now for a message from our Canadian Win4Youth Ambassadors!

The Win4Youth program brings The Adecco Group employees, associates and clients together to share their passion for sport and to have a positive impact on the lives of young people around the world.  At the end of October, we’re excited to have 2 members of our Adecco Group family join 70 colleagues from around the world at the first ever Win4Youth Triathlon, powered by Oceanlava, in Lanzarote, Spain.

Anne Nguyen and Christian Robert are Canada’s representatives on the North American team. They were selected for their passion for Win4Youth, social media and fundraising efforts, and their dedication to The Adecco Group core values. Below, Anne and Christian tell us about their individual journeys to become Win4Youth ambassadors.

Anne Nguyen

What initially enticed me to consider applying to become a Win4Youth Ambassador was the opportunity to travel to Europe and make connections within The Adecco Group globally. However, I didn’t think I would be able to do the activities it took to get selected, like organizing a fundraiser and increasing my social media presence. I also worried about completing the triathlon if I was selected.

As I mulled over my application, I spoke with a colleague who had triathlon experience. She helped me realize that I can do anything I put my mind to. It also didn’t hurt that I made it a goal at the beginning of 2018 to push myself out of my comfort zone.

A few days later, I realized I wanted it. I wanted to be Canada’s Win4Youth Ambassador. I wanted to be the ambassador that could motivate all the underdogs! So, I took the leap. I figured I had nothing to lose and everything to gain.

With the help and support of my manager, we started a competition between our Calgary and Edmonton branches to see which office could log the most kilometres in 5 days. Let me tell you, there’s nothing like the Battle of Alberta to light a fire under everyone. Not only did I succeed at getting mostly everyone to participate, I was able to fundraise and create awareness for my charity of choice, Believe in the Gold,[1] which raises funds for childhood cancer research and family support in Alberta.

Now as I begin to share my journey, I want people to realize that anything is possible. I want to be able to share all the highs and lows, and prove that self-doubt is nothing when you have an amazing support network behind you. My journey has only begun and I already feel so grateful for all the support I have received. I am so proud to be part of The Adecco Group Family and can’t wait to make you all proud! Please continue to follow my journey over these next few months and see me cross the finish line in Lanzarote, Spain in October.

Christian Robert

I have been running off and on for the last 20 years, and more regularly in the last year and a half. I even participated in a marathon in 2006 and have run a few 10K races and half marathons in recent years. But I’m far from an elite athlete; I’m especially not an experienced cyclist or swimmer. I even once told my avid triathlete brother-in-law that I would never do a triathlon. Too hard, too much training and engagement. Not for me.

Yet here I am, committed to my first Olympic triathlon in October. What happened? The easy answer is I lost my mind — but it’s a little more complicated than that.

In the last 18 months, I’ve been more committed to my training than ever before. I haven’t been training harder, necessarily, but I’ve been more consistent, focusing on my next run and striving to never miss a training session. It’s all thanks to the Win4Youth program, which got me started and keeps me motivated while I compete against my colleagues to log more kilometres than everyone else.

But, as I’ve learned about myself, I also need new challenges to keep me motivated. Otherwise, I get bored without a “mission” to accomplish and I slow down my training; running less often to the point where I have to start training all over again. Trying to maintain my ranking as one of the top 5 Canadian colleagues who has logged the most kilometres would only keep me motivated for so long. So, I registered for the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Half Marathon last fall and then for the Around the Bay Road Race in March. It worked. I kept training regularly.

But then what? If I didn’t have a project to concentrate on, I worried that my bad habit of losing motivation would resurface. And this time, I decided it would be different. I would continue training no matter what. There are just too many benefits! (Stay tuned for my thoughts on this topic!)

 “What keeps me going is goals.”

  • Muhammad Ali

My main objective was simple: continue exercising regularly. To do so, I had to find a new mission. Even though I was scared to admit it, the Win4Youth triathlon was the perfect project. It would take me out of my comfort zone, but still be exciting and motivating! I mean, travelling to Belgium and Lanzarote (have you see what it looks like?) and having all your colleagues cheering you on — that’s exciting! For me, the scary part is having to swim 1.5 km in the ocean, cycle 40 km and run 10 km, but if I train consistently, I know I can do it. Besides, now that I’ve found my “mission”, I’m fine.

So far, it’s working. I’m concentrating on preparing for training camp in Ghent, Belgium by focusing on swimming to improve my technique and endurance, and adding cycling to my routine.

I’ll strive to do as well as the previous Canadian ambassadors and make everyone proud. This is the beginning of a long journey. My goal: enjoy every minute of it. Stay tuned for more to come on my adventure.

This is the first in a series from our Win4Youth Ambassadors as they get ready for the Win4Youth Triathlon in Lanzarote, Spain. Read more about the program here.[2] And follow along on Facebook[3] and Twitter[4] with #Win4Youth.

To view more of our blogs and articles, visit our Employer resources page on our website.


[1] https://www.believeinthegold.com/

[2] http://www.win4youth.com/

[3] https://www.facebook.com/win4youth/

[4] https://twitter.com/Win4Youth

Triathlons Made Me a Better Employee

My legs are on fire; they feel so heavy. My mouth is chalk-dry, I’m extremely thirsty. People around me are cheering but the noise is so intense that I can’t distinguish the voices. A bell rings continuously, as if someone is trying to gain my attention. My body leans dangerously forward. I raise my head to catch my balance. The side of my face is so hot; the sweat is burning my skin! To my right, I see children cheering and wanting a high-five. Far ahead, I see a woman holding up a sign, “How did you get those great legs?” Next to her is a man with a sign that reads, “You can do this!” I sport a huge smile, despite the pain. After 1.9 km of swimming, 90 km of cycling and 21 km of running, I cross the finish line of my first half IRONMAN (70.3) triathlon race.

Why? Why not!

I began training for triathlons a few years ago and I quickly found that it’s not just a sport, but a way of life. As a triathlete, I’ve become more aware of who I am and I’ve developed skills and personality traits that have transcended into my career and personal life.

Humility

I began training for triathlons as a novice athlete. I felt exasperated during my first few outings especially during the first swim challenge. As I got over this hurdle, the experience taught me a lot. I learned to be humble, to challenge myself and to work better within a team.

These skills have helped in my work environment too! I’ve became more empathetic towards new employees, I’ve learned to overcome work obstacles and to work effectively with my team.

Goal Oriented

Triathlons teach us to set goals, to go faster, and to go further. There are individuals that have lost their passion, given up, or have stopped setting life goals. They may continue to dream, but they’ve quit working towards their goals or specific timelines. They tell themselves “when I have the time, I’d like to…”, but they never seem to make the time.

The triathlon motivates individuals into setting goals and becoming achievers.  To finish what they start, and persevere until they reach their goal.  Triathletes don’t put off till tomorrow, what they can do today.

Self-honesty and Self Motivation

Triathletes learn quickly to know themselves and face the truth.  For instance, you’ve finished a race and the time on your watch is below your expectations, you realize you have to motivate yourself to try harder the next time. You can’t be someone that ends your spinning training 5-10 minutes early by convincing yourself you will do it next session. It’s about being honest with yourself.  It’s about seizing the moment.  It’s about learning to be self-motivated and not only setting your goals, but seeing them through.

The skills gained will allow you to be forthright and motivated to get the job done.

Energy and Productivity

Employees who are involved in sports have more energy and are less likely to become ill. According to a study by Goodwill, “a sedentary individual who starts practicing a sport at work will increase his or her productivity by 6% – 9%.[1]. Employers see “a 1% – 14% increase in net productivity.”[2] Thus, it pays to be athletic! Need I say more?

IRONMAN quote:

“There are two types of people, those who say I CAN’T and those who say I CAN!”

Which one are you?

Why Participate in Win4Youth

The Adecco’s Win4Youth program allows employees and clients to log their km when they take part in sports events during their free time. The km are then turned into donations supporting disadvantaged youngsters, children and their families around the globe. In eight years, this initiative has raised €2 million for various charity organizations.

Win4Youth provides employees with the opportunity to get healthy and share quality time with their peers and family members. By encouraging one another to exercise, we work together towards a common goal. It is not just about the organizations profitability but about helping the less fortunate and creating a wonderful team experience.

So, are you convinced? I hope so! See you next time at the track, in the pool or on the bike path!

Happy training,

Pierre-Luc

Pierre-Luc Pérusse is the Branch Manager for Adecco’s Quebec City branch. He helps organizations attract the best talent and leads a team of innovative recruiters. With over 5 years of experience in the staffing industry, Pierre-Luc believes a recruiter’s greatest asset is his personality and his ability to build relationships. Heading into his thirties, he likes to juggle challenges: young family, career, IRONMAN – he is always ready for the next one. A graduate of the Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières’s Human Resources program, Pierre-Luc enjoys sharing his passion for the field on social media.

 

[1] http://www.travail-prevention-sante.fr/mediatheque/8/2/1/000001128.pdf

[2] http://www.travail-prevention-sante.fr/mediatheque/8/2/1/000001128.pdf

 

Share your Win4Youth story on Social Media and make sure to hashtag ##Win4Youth.

How to Motivate Employees Every Day

We’ve talked a lot about how money isn’t the primary motivator for most employees, how ensuring your employees have a healthy work-life balance and opportunities for professional growth increase morale and retention, and how compensation is about much more than the net yield at the bottom of a paystub.  All of these factors are important to consider when creating an effective, overarching policy for motivating employees in the long-term. But what about during the daily grind of the workplace? Does telling someone of their professional development options lift their spirits if they’re having a bad day? Does reminding them of summer hours transport them to a happy place when they’re burning the midnight oil in the dead of February? Although such benefits definitely do influence employees’ attitudes, especially when they’re deciding to join or stay at your organization, the following are ideas on how to motivate employees each and every day in more immediate ways. Read more

New Manager Tips for Enhanced Leadership Skills

You’ve done it. You’ve mastered your original job and have had bestowed upon you the illustrious title of Manager. Congratulations. You now have reports whose very careers rest in your more-than-capable hands. And if they fail to do your bidding, all you need is to clench those hands, reminding them who’s boss. After all, what else should they expect from the soon-to-be President, CEO, and Galactic Emperor? But before you charge into you own Little Bighorn, you should probably take a little bit of time to brush up on your leadership skills…just to be safe, my liege. After all, history is filled with lesser leaders, many of whom would have traded their kingdom for a horse in the end. Below are a few new manager tips to avoid their fate…Not that you need them, of course. Read more

Wearing Corporate Culture on their Sleeves: An Interview with Hicham Ratnani and Ethan Song

This article originally appeared in Lēad Magazine, Issue 15: The Value of Brand Attraction.

Boasting more than 100 employees – and growing – after just two years in business, Montreal-based menswear company, Frank & Oak, has made amazing headway in changing how men shop for their clothes. Every month, the company website features new, on trend clothing and accessories, which Frank & Oak itself designs and manufactures. This stunning startup success all began with co-founders Hicham Ratnani and Ethan Song, who sat down with Adecco to discuss how they first acquired the employees they needed to flourish, how their workforce needs continue to evolve, and what they do to adapt to those changes. Read more