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Posts tagged ‘Career Goals’

Making the Most of Your January

Maybe it’s the after-effects of holiday excess or the unpredictable weather and limited sunshine, but after the hustle and bustle of the holidays, it can be difficult to re-establish regular routines come January. So when the jingle bells return to email notifications and the sleigh rides turn back into your regular commute, use the following five tips to jump start your new year.

Set small goals

Jumping back into the thick of things after a break is challenging under the best of circumstances, let alone after the excitement of the holiday season. To help ease the transition, try setting small goals for the first week back. The sense of accomplishment gained after crossing a few items off your to-do list will motivate you to take on bigger and harder tasks.

Make healthy choices

After over-indulging throughout the holiday season, it may be hard to get yourself back on track health-wise. Start small by cleaning out your fridge. Bring leftover cookies and snacks to the office and make sure your home is stocked with healthy snacks that are readily available when those cravings hit! A healthy diet has direct links to good mental health and higher energy levels, so start your year off right with healthy habits.

Find a way to laugh

When you laugh, your body releases endorphins — the body’s natural “feel-good” chemicals — that instantly raise your spirits. To exercise your funny bone, consider taking in a comedy show, watching a funny movie or sharing jokes with colleagues and friends. You may find laughing to be the perfect antidote to gloomy January days and long nights.

Perk up your social life

The holiday parties may be over, but your social life doesn’t have to be! To help tackle feelings of loneliness, take some time to reconnect with friends and family. Meet for coffee, start a book club or join a team sport. Surrounding yourself with people may be the distraction you need to beat the post-holiday blues.

Make positive changes

Remember, the new year can mean a new you! Try to look at January as a fresh start in making those positive changes in your life. Ready for a new career? Start by revising your résumé. Looking to get in shape? Check out your local gym. Taking small steps to stay on track with those New Year’s resolutions will leave you feeling positive and accomplished.

Don’t let January drag you down! With the right start, 2018 may be your best year yet!

From all of us here at Adecco Canada, we wish you and yours a safe and happy holiday season!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information and articles, visit our Employment resources page on our website.

Triathlons Made Me a Better Employee

My legs are on fire; they feel so heavy. My mouth is chalk-dry, I’m extremely thirsty. People around me are cheering but the noise is so intense that I can’t distinguish the voices. A bell rings continuously, as if someone is trying to gain my attention. My body leans dangerously forward. I raise my head to catch my balance. The side of my face is so hot; the sweat is burning my skin! To my right, I see children cheering and wanting a high-five. Far ahead, I see a woman holding up a sign, “How did you get those great legs?” Next to her is a man with a sign that reads, “You can do this!” I sport a huge smile, despite the pain. After 1.9 km of swimming, 90 km of cycling and 21 km of running, I cross the finish line of my first half IRONMAN (70.3) triathlon race.

Why? Why not!

I began training for triathlons a few years ago and I quickly found that it’s not just a sport, but a way of life. As a triathlete, I’ve become more aware of who I am and I’ve developed skills and personality traits that have transcended into my career and personal life.

Humility

I began training for triathlons as a novice athlete. I felt exasperated during my first few outings especially during the first swim challenge. As I got over this hurdle, the experience taught me a lot. I learned to be humble, to challenge myself and to work better within a team.

These skills have helped in my work environment too! I’ve became more empathetic towards new employees, I’ve learned to overcome work obstacles and to work effectively with my team.

Goal Oriented

Triathlons teach us to set goals, to go faster, and to go further. There are individuals that have lost their passion, given up, or have stopped setting life goals. They may continue to dream, but they’ve quit working towards their goals or specific timelines. They tell themselves “when I have the time, I’d like to…”, but they never seem to make the time.

The triathlon motivates individuals into setting goals and becoming achievers.  To finish what they start, and persevere until they reach their goal.  Triathletes don’t put off till tomorrow, what they can do today.

Self-honesty and Self Motivation

Triathletes learn quickly to know themselves and face the truth.  For instance, you’ve finished a race and the time on your watch is below your expectations, you realize you have to motivate yourself to try harder the next time. You can’t be someone that ends your spinning training 5-10 minutes early by convincing yourself you will do it next session. It’s about being honest with yourself.  It’s about seizing the moment.  It’s about learning to be self-motivated and not only setting your goals, but seeing them through.

The skills gained will allow you to be forthright and motivated to get the job done.

Energy and Productivity

Employees who are involved in sports have more energy and are less likely to become ill. According to a study by Goodwill, “a sedentary individual who starts practicing a sport at work will increase his or her productivity by 6% – 9%.[1]. Employers see “a 1% – 14% increase in net productivity.”[2] Thus, it pays to be athletic! Need I say more?

IRONMAN quote:

“There are two types of people, those who say I CAN’T and those who say I CAN!”

Which one are you?

Why Participate in Win4Youth

The Adecco’s Win4Youth program allows employees and clients to log their km when they take part in sports events during their free time. The km are then turned into donations supporting disadvantaged youngsters, children and their families around the globe. In eight years, this initiative has raised €2 million for various charity organizations.

Win4Youth provides employees with the opportunity to get healthy and share quality time with their peers and family members. By encouraging one another to exercise, we work together towards a common goal. It is not just about the organizations profitability but about helping the less fortunate and creating a wonderful team experience.

So, are you convinced? I hope so! See you next time at the track, in the pool or on the bike path!

Happy training,

Pierre-Luc

Pierre-Luc Pérusse is the Branch Manager for Adecco’s Quebec City branch. He helps organizations attract the best talent and leads a team of innovative recruiters. With over 5 years of experience in the staffing industry, Pierre-Luc believes a recruiter’s greatest asset is his personality and his ability to build relationships. Heading into his thirties, he likes to juggle challenges: young family, career, IRONMAN – he is always ready for the next one. A graduate of the Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières’s Human Resources program, Pierre-Luc enjoys sharing his passion for the field on social media.

 

[1] http://www.travail-prevention-sante.fr/mediatheque/8/2/1/000001128.pdf

[2] http://www.travail-prevention-sante.fr/mediatheque/8/2/1/000001128.pdf

 

Share your Win4Youth story on Social Media and make sure to hashtag ##Win4Youth.

THE INSTANT GENERATION CAN PLAN FOR A LASTING FUTURE

This article originally appeared in Lēad Magazine, Issue 20 – Millennials in the Workplace: Leaders of Today.

By Dr. Peter R. Andersen, Anderson Economic Research Inc. 

 

Millennials face a bright future, even though they may not see it.The malaise facing young people today cannot be attributed to age alone. The decade you are born in matters a great deal; the political climate, economy, societal values and global trends of the time significantly influence your opportunities, schooling, family life and career. Children born in the 1890s or the 1920s were unlucky; they faced the devastation of WW1 and WW2. In contrast, the 1930s and 1940s were opportune times to be born; the low birth rates during those years created little competition for university and jobs when those babies came of age during the economic boom years of the 1950s and 1960s.

The current Millennial generation is facing its own set of historical forces. Income security and careers with longevity seem hard to find in this replaceable and global job market.  The Canadian youth labour market shows elevated rates of unemployment compared to prior to the Great Recession and in relation to older Canadians[1]. Older Millennials who were able to start their careers before the 2008-2009 recession may be less affected by these trends, but the entire cohort has been negatively impacted by its aftermath. Millennials are also frustrated that the skills and knowledge they spent years acquiring (in addition to student debt) are not being utilized: among 16-35 year olds, there is a pronounced mismatch between those with medium to high literacy rates who have jobs that engage only medium-low literacy skills[2]. And traditional work no longer offers the benefits and incentives that it once did in earlier decades. The average annual income is the lowest of the last three generations[3], while the cost of housing—particularly in North American tech-hub cities (San Francisco, Silicon Valley, New York, Seattle, Toronto and Vancouver)—is at an all-time high. Job openings in these prohibitively expensive cities repeatedly go unfilled.

Companies are finding it challenging to find young candidates willing to do the work and to retain them long enough to become leaders, while Millennials are out there—desperate for career development and salaries they can use to pay off debts and raise their own budding families on. Millennials living in urban areas—as most do[4]—simply cannot afford to accept entry-level or low paying positions, and they know they are qualified for more.

Fortunately, Millennials have an expertise that will be the key to their long-term career success. They were born into the digital era and at the cusp of a new technology cycle—starting with the information and telecommunications revolution in the early 1980s when IBM introduced its first PC. And much like the Commodore 64, the Macintosh and Dell’s Turbo PC that followed suit, Millennials grew up capitalizing on technological advancements as they approached adulthood by Y2K. The productivity tools (Microsoft), access to information (Google), social networking (Facebook) and mobile computing (smartphones) that came out of the subsequent years fundamentally changed the Millennial relationship with technology like no other peer group in history. Their digital skills give them a clear advantage over the previous analog generations.

The current technology driven economic cycle is still young. Cloud computing was not introduced until 2006 and it took several years for other providers to realize the power of what Amazon Web Services (AWS) had developed. The cloud is now making a huge contribution, enabling and accelerating the start-up of new companies. While the IT application and infrastructure cycle was interrupted by the financial crisis, it is now speeding up. It will be recharged in 2017 by a rebound in the U.S. economy that should last through the rest of this decade.

The well-paying jobs that require technical expertise will be found in this sector, perfectly suited for Millennials’ skillsets and aspirations. The reduced quality of traditional full-time work opportunities is pressuring Millennials to be entrepreneurial and their efforts will fit well with nascent tech companies who require a business culture with an innovative spirit and freedom from conventional thinking and administrative bureaucracy. Millennials are ready to answer the call. They are frustrated by an analog business culture and decision making process that moves slowly; they have grown up used to quick answers and quick results. As long as they can develop their soft skills to be persuasive in the business environment—and are able to influence colleagues and sell their ideas—their efficient digital approach, creativity, passion and communal influence should lead to business success.

Their high student debt will also pay off in time. The 2013 National Graduates Survey demonstrated that median estimated earnings increase with each level of post-secondary educational completed.[5] Most graduates of post-secondary institutions are having success finding employment in both good economic climates and bad, with almost 80% of employed graduates reporting a ‘close’ or ‘somewhat’ close relationship between their education and job 3 years after graduation.[6] Education is still a worthwhile investment for this generation.

Fortunately, the next recession is nowhere in sight. The business cycle is not yet in its late stages. Fears of an extended period of secular stagnation in the U.S. are unfounded. In fact, the underlying economic fundamentals—strong household balance sheets, manageable business sector leverage, highly capitalized and liquid banks, backlogs of consumer and housing demand—all point to the onset of an extended period of solid economic growth in the United States. In time, this will inevitably spill over into Canada. Millennials already have the skills and education for success. The positive economic climate on the horizon will give them the opportunities they need to fully realize their dreams.

Source:
[1] https://www.td.com/document/PDF/economics/special/YoungAndRestless.pdf
[2] https://www.td.com/document/PDF/economics/special/YoungAndRestless.pdf
[3] http://www.environicsanalytics.ca/docs/default-source/eauc2015-presentations/dougnorris-afternoonplenary.pdf?sfvrsn=6
[4] http://www.environicsanalytics.ca/docs/default-source/eauc2015-presentations/dougnorris-afternoonplenary.pdf?sfvrsn=6
[5] https://www.td.com/document/PDF/economics/special/YoungAndRestless.pdf
[6] https://www.td.com/document/PDF/economics/special/YoungAndRestless.pdf

New Year Career Resolutions

A New Year is ahead, leaving many of us in a panic to establish solid resolutions and attainable goals for the coming year. Don’t panic – there are no rules when it comes to resolutions and preparedness. Establish what is attainable for you, and remember that you don’t need to reinvent yourself – just work on improving yourself. Last year we prepared an illustrated version of top resolutions, but let’s take a different approach this year, as it is a New Year after all, and focus on how you can build your New Year career resolutions for 2015.

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