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Staffing Trends

Here at Adecco, we are focused on staying up-to-date with evolving staffing trends. Heavily influenced by technology and cost-saving efforts, the recruitment industry is always changing. To help you navigate this environment, keep reading for a roundup of some recent and relevant staffing trends in Canada.

Employer Branding

With increased competition to attract and retain top talent, employer branding can take companies to the next level. According to a recent LinkedIn report, talent acquisition leaders broadly agree that employer branding is an important factor in their recruitment efforts.[i] And because candidates can afford to be selective about which companies they choose, company culture messaging is essential in capturing a potential candidate’s attention.

Social Recruiting

Employers are leveraging online professional networking sites like LinkedIn to appeal to their target candidate demographics. These sites facilitate online recruitment efforts and provide effective ways of engaging potential candidates to evaluate fit prior to the interview stage. Social networking sites have also proven to be a successful component of an employer branding strategy, giving users the opportunity to market the organization, as well as open positions to candidate pools.

Candidate Screening

With evolving technology, employers can now rely on automated screening methods to facilitate the hiring process. Algorithms and artificial intelligence help recruiters filter candidates efficiently, ensuring that every candidate being interviewed is equipped with the skills required for the role. These tools allow employers to focus on the best fit for their corporate culture, while saving them the time and energy of manually sifting through numerous applications.

On-Demand Workforce

The growing trend of an on-demand workforce enables employers to scale their workforce up or down to flexibly meet the demands of short-term requirements or rapid business shifts. It’s expected that by 2020 almost half of Canada’s working population will be self-employed.[ii] This model offers benefits to both employees, who have the flexibility to set their own schedule and rates, and employers, who can save the added cost of benefits, paid vacation, pension and more.

Recruitment Process Outsourcing

Don’t have the resources to recruit internally? You’re not alone! Many companies with a small or non-existent HR department rely on outsourcing their recruitment process. This could be in the form of consulting a headhunter to tackle your hiring needs, or working with an employment agency to assist in recruitment efforts big or small.

Keeping up-to-date with current staffing trends can help ensure your recruitment efforts yield optimal results. At Adecco, recruiting is our business.  We can help you respond to these trends or fill those challenging roles, so contact your local Adecco branch today and speak to a qualified Recruitment Consultant.

To view more of our blogs and articles, visit our Employer resources page on our website.


[i] U.S and Canada Recruiting Trends 2017 – What you need to know about the state of talent acquisition. LinkedIn https://business.linkedin.com/content/dam/me/business/en-us/talent-solutions/resources/pdfs/us-and-canada-recruiting-trends-2017.pdf

[ii] Intuit says 45% of Canadians will be self-employed by 2020 releases new app to help with finances. Financial Post http://business.financialpost.com/technology/personal-tech/intuit-says-45-of-canadians-will-be-self-employed-by-2020-releases-new-app-to-help-with-finances

 

Why Temporary Jobs Are Great For Students This Summer

#TempEmployment

As summer approaches, students across the country are gearing up for the summer job hunt, looking for short term employment to cover increasing costs of living, tuition etc. If this sounds like you, don’t overlook temporary work, which offers many benefits when you’re looking to make some extra money this summer.

Gain experience

Temporary work is a great way to enhance your post-secondary education. By working a temp position in your industry, you can earn a competitive salary while gaining hands-on skills that you can’t learn in the classroom. Plus, these positions give you insight into workplace expectations and set you up for success after you graduate.

Get ahead of the game

Temporary work is a great way to make connections that can set the stage for your career after graduation. It’s no secret that networking is an essential part of the job hunt and can be something students struggle with. With temporary placements, you can get a step ahead of similar candidates and score a few good references for your post-graduation job search.

Perks of full time work

There’s no denying the perks that come with full time employment. Whereas part time work often comes with inconsistent hours, evening and weekend work, and frequently requires open availability, full time positions offer stable working hours. A temporary position gives you the best of both worlds, offering you the flexibility to select a position that provides you with your desired hour or assignment duration, while giving you the stability not offered with shift work. Not to mention the added perks of vacation pay, stat holiday pay and healthcare plans common to a full-time position.

Effortless

After 8 months of studying, it can be challenging to motivate yourself to initiate the job hunt. Revising resumes, applying for jobs, lining up interviews — looking for work can be hard work! With a staffing agency like Adecco, qualified recruiters can find positions for you in many fields of employment, taking much of the work out of finding your next favourite summer job.

Regardless of your employment status, whether you are a student looking to make money for your education, or suddenly find yourself without work looking for a quick re-entry, a temp position may be the perfect fit.

With new temporary and permanent positions opening daily, contact your local Adecco branch to speak with a recruiter and register for free today!


To view more of our blogs and articles, visit our Employment resources page on our website.

 

Including Inclusion

By: Megan Wickens

It’s easy to say that there’s a difference between diversity and inclusion, but drawing out the differences between these two goals is not as easy. In this guest post, Megan Wickens, head of our Alberta trades division and member of our Canadian Diversity and Inclusion Committee, looks at how inclusion policies are the next frontier in the corporate world.

There’s no doubt that we need to focus on building a culture of inclusion in the workplace and in the world.

What is diversity in the workplace? The dictionary defines diversity as the condition of having or being composed of differing elements: variety. And when we talk about diversity in the workplace, we’re usually referring to these 4 elements: ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation and age.

While diversity is buried in the corporate policy of most companies, I would argue that it’s worth so much more than that. Our goal should be to create a culture of diverse talent. Instead of thinking of it as an obligation to meet diversity targets, to check off an item on a checklist, we need to reframe diversity so that it considers the inclusion of diverse viewpoints.

It doesn’t have to be hard. We do it all the time in business: diversifying portfolios and product mixes to stay ahead of the curve. Now apply the same to people – why wouldn’t we want to include diverse viewpoints from people who add value to our business and our lives? Inclusive policies can help us get there!

A little bit about me

I am on the Canadian Diversity & Inclusion Committee with the largest HR staffing company in the world and I head up the trades division in Alberta for our engineering brand (an industry that is predominantly male). I am married and do not have kids (none on two legs anyways #dogmom). I am considered a millennial, but I’ve spent almost a decade in the technical recruitment industry and another handful of years in the customer service industry.

I bring these things up because I want you to know where I’m coming from. In my career, I have not felt that my age (or lack of age) played a role in my ability to be hired. I have not felt that I was asked to do more work because I don’t have kids that depend on me. I have not felt that my opinion wasn’t valued or that I wasn’t being included. I’ve been lucky.

The truth is that many people do feel this way. And it can be hard to accept that we aren’t all inclusive leaders. So, thinking about the way that we are (and are not) inclusive can be a valuable exercise for all of us.

Focus on inclusion

My husband sent me a video created by Accenture that emphasizes the sometimes unconscious exclusion of people that can happen even when diversity targets have been met. The video highlights the ways that our differences can inform how we interact with each other, which can sometimes create uncomfortable (or even untenable) work experiences that prevent us from reaching our full potential.

The video raises questions about the ways that we treat our colleagues: what informs our expectations? How do we articulate these expectations? It ends with a call to recognize these biases and embrace change for the better – change that comes from refocusing on inclusion.

I urge you to watch the video at the end of this blog, sit back, think hard and decide — am I an inclusive leader? As leaders, we constantly need to be self-aware and empathetic; understanding our audience and showing emotional intelligence is an important part of the job. So, it’s important that we ask ourselves these important questions: Do we really know our teams? How can we know them better? How can we get the best out of everyone and not just from those who rise to the top out of sheer determination?

On our teams, everyone should be a top performer. Everyone should be valued and recognized for adding value. It’s clear that we’re better off when our diverse teams are able to contribute to our success, so let’s focus on building a culture of inclusion in the workplace and the world.


To view more of our blogs and articles, visit our Employer resources page on our website.

Why an Internship Program?

Internships are more than a mandatory student requirement and experience on a resume. A well-managed internship program can bring significant benefits to an organization.  Here’s how your organization can reap the rewards.

  1. Fresh Perspectives

Student interns bring with them fresh ideas and perspectives that can have a great impact on a business. Recent grads are generally tech savvy and fluent with social media platforms — positioning them well to impact marketing strategies! To tap into your intern’s ideas and creativity, create an environment in which they feel comfortable so they are at ease to participate in meetings and brainstorm sessions.

  1. Brand Recognition

Good news travels fast.  Internship programs show potential job seekers and existing employees that your company believes in employee development.  These programs also shed light on positive corporate values to existing and new clients.  Adopting such a program and making it a positive experience, means that people will talk about your company to their network — setting your brand apart from other companies competing for similar talent and clients.

  1. Increased Productivity

Internship programs are a cost-effective solution to providing extra support staff members sometimes need. Interns lend great support with administrative tasks and other entry level projects, allowing employees to focus on higher level business tasks. This prevents existing employees from becoming over burdened with a high workload — while ultimately increasing productivity.

  1. Recruitment Tool

Internships are a great way to evaluate a potential candidate without the commitment of hiring them permanently. This year-round recruitment tool creates larger pools of talent to pull from, with workforce ready candidates. Should you decide to hire an intern, the result is a new employee who is fully trained and understands your business — allowing you to save costs on recruitment and training!

  1. Giving back to the community

Developing a well-managed internship is a great way to give back to the community and demonstrate that you value their support of your business. Not to mention, internship programs increase employment levels, enhance the local workforce and economy, and, assist graduates in developing professional skills. What better way to solidify a positive corporate culture that encapsulates social responsibility?

Need help implementing an internship program for your company? Contact Adecco Canada for resources and assistance, and start reaping the benefits of a well-managed internship today!


To view more of our blogs and articles, visit our Employer resources page on our website.

Staffing for Canada Week

Staffing for Canada Week is upon us once again. It’s an annual celebration that gives us the opportunity to recognize the many contributions of Canadians who are employed through staffing firms. At Adecco, we know that our outstanding temporary associates are the reason for our success, which is why we’re proud to give over 9,000 people a chance to work at great companies every week.

Here at Adecco, we recognize the valuable contributions that temporary workers make to our clients. Whether it’s providing support during peak periods of increased business or additional assistance to ensure projects meet their deadlines, temporary workers are often the unsung heroes of a business. So this week, we take a moment (and some blog space) to acknowledge the MVPs of the staffing world: temporary workers.

People make the difference

Talent is the multiplier. The more energy and attention you invest in it, the greater the yield.      – Marcus Buckingham, Author and Business Consultant

Good employees are a company’s greatest asset. Their hard work not only keeps a business alive, it helps the business thrive. After all, employees are the ones who know the business inside and out. We believe that recognizing our temporary employees for the contributions they make — not just during Staffing for Canada Week, but throughout the year — helps empower workers to truly make a difference within their organizations

How we value our associates

How do we show this appreciation for our temporary associates? It’s simple. We treat all our associates like the top candidates we know they are. This includes a competitive compensation and benefits package, which enables our associates to take control of their careers, while providing them with the flexibility to find the right position, hours and wages to fit their lifestyle. But it also includes the small things — follow-up calls and reward programs show our appreciation throughout the year.

Consider temporary work

Looking to rejoin the workforce or get a foot in the door? Want to work for great companies with the flexibility to be selective about your next job? Then temporary assignments might be for you! With temporary work, our associates can take advantage of the high levels of personal flexibility and the opportunity to try on various hats to develop transferable skills that short-term assignments offer. Plus, they get to pick the right position that enhances their professional and personal lives.

This week, as we celebrate the contributions temporary associates make to Canadian businesses, join Adecco in saying: Thank you!

To view more of our blogs and articles, visit our Employment resources page on our website.


 

Can I do more?

By:  Camillo Zacchia, Ph.D. – Psychologist

In this guest post, clinical psychologist Dr. Camillo Zacchia looks at the tendency to question whether we’re doing enough. He looks at the personality types that can get derailed by these feelings of inadequacy and offers a way forward when confronted by the sense that you’re not doing enough. Read on for Dr. Zacchia’s article on the art of good enough.

Can I do more? This question is a trap if I ever heard one.

Can I do more to help my parents? Can I do a better job on this assignment? Can I eat better? These types of questions are endless and the only answer to them is yes. The simple fact is we can always do more or do better. This means that in order to stop working on something, we have to accept this fact and just “be OK” with it. In other words, we have to accept that good enough is good enough.

But what happens to people who can’t be satisfied with good enough? Those who are unable to accept this option are going to be in trouble. The question of “can I do more?” will leave them with only two other options. The first is to be disappointed with not doing their best and the second is to try harder and keep going. But if they try harder, they are still left with the question of “can I do more?” and they’re right back to the same two options of trying harder or being disappointed. There is no alternative. For them, all roads eventually lead to disappointment.

Of course, this isn’t a big issue for most of us. The majority of people can live with good enough. They acknowledge that they can do better — after all, nobody’s perfect — but can nevertheless be satisfied with what they’ve done. No disappointment for these people. But there are others who have a much harder time letting go, and for them the question of “can I do more?” will cause significant problems and often lead to feelings of burnout. There are two groups of people who have particular difficulty letting things stand.

The perfectionists
Some people just can’t seem to be happy until things are just right: a job that seems well done still needs refining, a good meal still needs a little something, nothing feels quite good enough. These people can sometimes be seen as perfectionists, or as picky. There is no denying the fact that their work is generally very high quality. The only problem is that they are rarely satisfied with it, even if everyone else around them is.

The guilt-ridden
There is another group of individuals who are governed by excessive guilt. They are generally seen as people pleasers and are constantly doing for others. This can include trying to please bosses, coworkers, friends or members of the family. Many of them may have grown up in a home with a parent who was difficult to please or who was needy, dependent and required lots of attention and help. Since everyone around them always has needs, the guilt-ridden can’t stop. To do so would mean to disappoint others and it just isn’t in their nature to let others down.

For the perfectionist and guilt-ridden people, the question of “can I do more?” is a trap. The answer will always be yes. As a result, they will keep pushing for more and will almost always overdo things, potentially leading to burnout or complete avoidance of people or responsibilities. It’s just too much work, so they often run away and simply stop trying.

This is the self-fulfilling prophecy we often see in such people. Even though they always do very well in both quantity and quality, at some point they know it won’t be good enough so they just give up. Ironically, it confirms their belief that they aren’t “good enough” because now they really are getting nothing done.

For those who aren’t very good at letting go, the only way around this bottomless pit of disappointment is to be aware of the trap that comes with the question “can I do more?” A far more functional question is “did I do a lot?” Just look at how your raw performance numbers or indicators stack up to others in your position. Do you treat as many dossiers as your co-workers? Do you do as much for your parents as your siblings? The answer to “did I do a lot?’ is usually also yes. But at least answering yes to this question does not require you to do more.

When we know in our logical minds that we did a lot — probably more than most others would — then we have to force ourselves to stop. This may make us uncomfortable at first but like all emotions, they fade over time. If we give in to these feelings, they will strengthen. If we don’t act on them, and allow them to dissipate naturally, they will get weaker and weaker over time.

The idea of things being good but not quite good enough may make you feel uncomfortable at first but by not giving in to your urges to do more, you will eventually feel that things really are just that…good enough.

To view more of our blogs and articles, visit our Employment resources page on our website.


Dr. Zacchia[1] is a clinical psychologist specializing in the treatment of anxiety disorders, depression and interpersonal problems. He blogs at Psychospeak with Dr. Z[2] and the Huffington Post Canada: The Ilk of Humankind[3].

Editor’s Note: A previous version of this post appeared on Psychospeak with Dr. Z.[4] It has been updated to provide additional details.

Stay tuned for more from Dr. Zacchia as he looks at mental health in the workplace.

[1] www.drzacchia.com

[2] http://blog.douglas.qc.ca/psychospeak/

[3] https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/author/camillo-zacchia-phd/

[4] http://blog.douglas.qc.ca/psychospeak/2015/07/07/can-i-do-more/