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Posts from the ‘Youth Employment’ Category

Why You Should Consider Applying To Be Our “CEO for One Month”

Are you a talented and ambitious young professional looking to jump-start your career? Want to see what the leadership of one of Canada’s top Workforce Solutions Providers really does all day? Then our “CEO for One Month” internship program was made for you. Read on to learn more about the program and how you can benefit from it.


Where many college/university internships have you making daily coffee runs and sitting in on company meetings, The Adecco Group’s “CEO for One Month” program exposes you to the inner workings of our Fortune 500 organization. Not only will you shadow the Adecco Canada’s President, you’ll be attending and participating in meetings with our top executives. And through onsite meetings across the country, you’ll gain exposure to the staffing industry from the branch level all the way to the corporate level.


When accepted to the “CEO for One Month” program, you become part of The Adecco Group organization. You are given real projects and the chance to contribute to the decision-making process. Through your work with us, you’ll add to your transferable skills, strengthening your resume and career prospects, regardless of your professional direction. The experience you gain from your month will set you apart from every other candidate for years to come! Plus, not only does the program offer an exceptional way to learn about the staffing industry, it gives you an opportunity to learn how to navigate and communicate with top executives and senior level management.

To learn firsthand about last year’s CEO for One Month, Alana Couvrette’s experience, visit:


Looking for a great reference? What better reference than Adecco Canada’s president! As “CEO for One Month”, you’ll be working alongside Gilbert Boileau, President of Adecco Canada, and making connections with the senior level management of one of the top staffing agencies in the world. Network your way to valuable connections that will last the rest of your professional life!


The opportunities provided by this internship are virtually limitless. To start, the boost to your employability from the experience you’ll gain will help you throughout your career. Plus, there’s the potential of being hired to work within Adecco’s corporate head office once the internship is completed. Finally, every “CEO for One Month” from participating countries can apply for The Adecco Group’s global “CEO for One Month” internship. The top 10 candidates from around the world will attend an all-expenses-paid boot camp in a major city, competing with candidates from around the world to become the global “CEO for One Month”. This is an opportunity of a lifetime you won’t want to miss!


Love to travel? The “CEO for One Month” program gives you the opportunity to travel from coast to coast with Gilbert Boileau on all Canada-wide business excursions, visiting branches and corporate offices. And, with the global “CEO for One Month” program based out of Zurich, Switzerland, the successful candidate is given the opportunity to travel across Europe. A travel enthusiast’s dream come true!


The icing on the cake? The Adecco Group’s “CEO for One Month” internship is a paid position! Forget compensation for bus passes or credit for school. Amidst the plethora of other benefits, the successful candidate will receive a full month’s salary. Plus, any required travel arrangements are paid by us. A month’s pay for a month’s work. REAL work. That should help put a dent in those student debts!

Think you have something to contribute? Then we’re looking for you! For more information on “CEO for One Month” and to apply visit us at  .

About Way to Work™
The Adecco Group launched Way to Work in 2013 to tackle youth unemployment and skills shortages, develop young people’s employability, and help them enter the world of work. Through Way to Work, The Adecco Group provides young people with internships and apprenticeships (over 10,500 between 2015 and 2016), career guidance and training, and an opportunity to be the ‘CEO for One Month’.

About the Adecco Group
The Adecco Group is the world’s leading workforce solutions partner. We provide more than 700,000 people with permanent and flexible employment every day. With more than 33,000 employees in 60 countries, we transform the world of work one job at a time. Our colleagues serve more than 100,000 organisations with the talent, HR services and cutting-edge technology they need to succeed in an ever-changing global economy. As a Fortune Global 500 company, we lead by example, creating shared value that meets social needs while driving business innovation. Our culture of inclusivity, fairness and teamwork empowers individuals and organisations, fuels economies, and builds better societies. These values resonate with our employees, who voted us number 2 on the Great Place to Work® – World’s Best Workplaces 2017 list. We make the future work for everyone.

The Adecco Group is based in Zurich, Switzerland. Adecco Group AG is registered in Switzerland (ISIN: CH0012138605) and listed on the SIX Swiss Exchange (ADEN). The group is powered by eight lead brands: Adecco, Modis, Badenoch & Clark, Spring Professional, Lee Hecht Harrison, Pontoon, Adia and YOSS.

For more information and articles, visit our Employment resources page on our website.

Canada’s Labour Force Survey, September 2017

Released at 8:30 a.m. Eastern time in The Daily, Friday, October 6, 2017

Employment was essentially unchanged in September (+10,000 or +0.1%). The unemployment rate remained at 6.2%, matching the low of October 2008. Gains in full-time employment (+112,000) in September were mostly offset by declines in part time (-102,000). In August, there was a decline in the number of people working full time and an increase in part time. In the 12 months to September, employment rose by 320,000 (+1.8%), spurred by gains in full-time employment (+289,000 or +2.0%). Over this period, the number of hours worked increased by 2.4%. Overall employment grew by 43,000 (+0.2%) in the third quarter, slower than the 0.6% growth rate in the second quarter and the 0.5% growth rate of the first quarter of 2017.

Chart 1 – Employment

Chart 2 – Unemployment Rate

From August to September, employment increased for people aged 55 and older, while it fell among men aged 25 to 54. For the second consecutive month, Ontario was the lone province with a notable employment gain. There were employment declines in Manitoba and Prince Edward Island. More people worked in educational services as well as wholesale and retail trade in September, while employment fell in information, culture and recreation. There was additional employment in the public sector, while the number of private sector employees was little changed. At the same time, the number of self-employed workers held steady.

More People Aged 55 and Older Working
Employment rose by 25,000 in September for people aged 55 and older, mostly in full-time work. Their unemployment rate was little changed at 5.4%. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment for people aged 55 and older increased by 131,000 (+3.4%). Among workers aged 55 and older, about 8 in 10 are between the ages of 55 and 64. The estimated year-over-year employment growth rate (unadjusted for seasonality) for 55- to- 64-year-olds was 2.6% in September and their population increased by 2.0%. While population growth was similar for men and women in this age group, employment grew at a faster pace for women (+3.5%) than for men (+1.8%). In comparison, people aged 65 and older comprised a smaller share of older workers, but had the fastest year-over-year employment growth rate (unadjusted for seasonality) among the major demographic groups in September, rising 9.1% and outpacing their rate of population growth (+3.7%). Among this group of workers, employment grew at a faster pace for men (+12.4%) than for women (+4.5%). For more information about recent trends among older workers, see “The impact of aging on labour market participation rates.”

Employment Declines Among Men aged 25 to 54
For men aged 25 to 54, employment declined by 29,000 in September—all in part-time work. The unemployment rate for men in this age group rose by 0.4 percentage points to 5.9%. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment for men aged 25 to 54 increased by 72,000 (+1.2%). Among women aged 25 to 54, full-time employment increased by 39,000 in September, while part time fell by 26,000, leaving overall employment for this group little changed. Their unemployment rate was 5.2%. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment among core aged women rose by 102,000 (+1.8%).

Youth Unemployment Rate Down
Overall youth employment was little changed in September a 37,000 increase in full-time work was mostly offset by part-time losses. Employment for 15- to 24 year-olds was relatively unchanged compared with 12 months earlier. The unemployment rate for youth has been on a downward trend since the start of 2017 and fell 1.2 percentage points to 10.3% in September. This was the lowest rate since comparable data became available in 1976. See Chart 8 in the Labour Force Information \ publication. The decline in the youth unemployment rate in September was due to fewer youths in the labour market. The participation rate for this group fell 0.7 percentage points to 62.7% in the month. At the same time, their rate of full-time school attendance was 56.4%—the highest rate for any September since 2011. Increased school attendance is associated with delayed labour market participation. For more information about this long-term trend, see the Canada 150 box “Evolution of youth in the labour market.”

Provincial Employment
In Ontario, employment rose by 35,000 in September, the fourth overall gain in five months. An increase of 78,000 in full-time employment was partly offset by a decline of 43,000 in part-time work. The overall employment increase in September was driven by gains in wholesale and retail trade as well as educational services. The unemployment rate was little changed at 5.6% in September. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment in Ontario was up 170,000 (+2.4%). Employment in Manitoba declined by 5,500 in September, almost all in part-time work. This was the first notable overall employment decrease in the province since April 2016. Despite the monthly decline, employment in Manitoba has been on an upward trend since the end of 2016. In September, the unemployment rate increased by 0.6 percentage points to 5.5%. In September, employment decreased in Prince Edward Island (-700), the second decline in three months. Despite the recent decreases, employment in the province was up by 1,600 (+2.2%) compared with September 2016. The unemployment rate increased by 0.7 percentage points in September to 9.5%. Overall employment in Quebec was little changed for the third consecutive month. In September, a decline of 25,000 in part-time work was mostly offset by additional people working full time. In the 12 months to September, employment in the province rose by 54,000 (+1.3%), concentrated in full-time work. Over the same 12 month period, the unemployment rate fell by 0.9 percentage points to 6.0%.

Industry Perspective
The number of people working in educational services increased by 20,000 in September, primarily in Ontario and Quebec. Employment in the industry was similar to the level observed in September 2016. Employment in wholesale and retail trade rose by 17,000 in September, bringing gains to 99,000 (+3.6%) since September 2016. Employment in information, culture and recreation decreased by 24,000 in September. On a year-over-year basis, employment in the industry edged down by 20,000 (-2.5%). Public sector employment rose by 26,000 in September, while the number of private sector employees was little changed. Compared with 12 months earlier, the number of private sector employees increased by 162,000 (+1.4%) and public sector employment rose by 103,000 (+2.8%). The number of self-employed workers held steady in September, with year-over-year gains totaling 55,000 (+2.0%).

Quarterly Update for the Territories
The Labour Force Survey collects labour market data in the territories, produced in the form of three-month moving averages.In the third quarter of 2017, employment in Yukon was little changed compared with the second quarter, and the unemployment rate was relatively unchanged at 3.3%. In the Northwest Territories, employment in the third quarter was unchanged from the previous quarter. Over the same period, the unemployment rate was little changed at 7.0%. Employment in Nunavut held steady in the third quarter, while the unemployment rate was 14.9%.

Source: Statistics Canada

Millennials Want More… Corporate Social Responsibility!

By CEO for One Month, Alana Couvrette

Millennials sometimes seem to get a bad rep as a narcissistic, entitled and self-centered generation. But is this fair to say? I don’ t think so…

For example, millennials expect more from their employers than a paycheck. They have a genuine desire to give back to communities, near and far. For them, purposeful work and the ability to create a positive impact take precedence on profit and salary. In fact, in a recent survey, it was revealed that 45% of student about to enter the workforce would even take a pay cut “for a job that makes a social or environmental impact.” They seek to work for organizations who enshrine good values and ethics into their business model.

Organizations, like Adecco, have taken note of this trend. They know that having an organization-wide aspiration to making a positive difference is part of their value-proposition for attracting and retaining the millennial talent pool.
However, trumpeting your values and ethics isn’t enough. You can’t just talk the talk… The young talent pool is eager to roll up their sleeves, get their hands dirty and participate in the efforts to improve communities near and dear to them. Organizations need to be able to offer opportunities for employees to truly engage in the change that they wish to make. Millennials seek diverse volunteerism opportunities.

At Adecco, our core values-passion, entrepreneurship, team spirit, responsibility and customer focus- permeate the whole business. As Adecco Canada’s CEO for One Month, I noticed this right away and can testify to their relevancy in our work. These values are also conveyed through our global employee engagement program, Win4Youth. This program encourages participants to clock up kilometers (through cycling, swimming or running) which are turned into donations to help disadvantaged youngsters find employment.

On June 22nd, 2017, Adecco Canada hosted their annual Solidarity Day, a day dedicated to Win4Youth. We spent the afternoon as a team running around Toronto completing a scavenger hunt filled with wacky photo ops and funny tasks. Maybe it’s just me but I didn’t even notice that we each accumulated around 9 kilometers. Multiply that by the total number of employees in the office and you’ve got a healthy donation! Curious to know how the day went? Watch this short video I made!

Still think millennials are self-centered? Deloitte’s Millennial Survey found that 7,800 young leaders from 29 different countries believe that the business world is getting it wrong. Close to 75% say that they feel businesses are “focused on their own agendas rather than improving society.”

Who’s looking self-centered now?



A CEO is Many Things…

By CEO for One Month, Alana Couvrette

Okay I’ll admit it… Before I started my CEO for One Month journey, when I heard the word “CEO” I thought: fancy cars, private jets, exclusive access to exclusive events and, overall, someone who has the world at their fingertips.

But, in reality, a CEO is so much more than what is portrayed in the movies. I wanted to take a moment and reflect on the role of a CEO, based on my experiences as Adecco Canada’s CEO for One Month. A CEO is:


… a mediator
Being a CEO isn’t always glamorous. CEOs are often caught in the middle of the toughest situations and must find a way to reconcile opposing views and help parties come to an agreement. CEOs have a knack for creating the right conditions for an agreement.

… the ultimate problem solver
CEOs face the thorniest of problems. By that I mean the unresolved issues that go through multiple levels of governance before landing on their desk. They not only solve problems, but also strategically create them. Challenges help people and companies grow, and a CEO knows exactly when it’s time to push and when it’s time to heed.

… a jack of all trades and a master of them all
CEOs know their business inside out. They’re expert generalists. They navigate vastly different areas of their business with ease and confidence. They have no problem jumping from one subject area to another and they do so at a pace that is dizzying for most!

… a story teller
A CEO’s got a story for everything. Their stories serve to illustrate, engage, inspire and motivate those around them. They’ve got “past lives” that can’t quite stay in the past and they’ve worn many hats throughout their careers. CEOs entice and engage their peers with their stories, telling them how they started their businesses, what they stand for and where they’re headed.

… the boss, but not necessarily the one you’re thinking of
A CEO doesn’t have to be unapproachable or someone who makes you hold your breath when they walk by. Leadership styles can vary and no one style is better than another. Each CEO-man or woman- brings something unique to the table. This is especially important to remember for anyone thinking of taking up a leadership position: You don’t have to “be like the last CEO” to be a successful CEO.

… a mentor and is mentored
CEOs know that mentoring employees is empowering them to succeed which, in turn, makes the organization succeed. However, just because they are at the “top” doesn’t mean that CEOs do not look up to someone or something. They’re all chasing some type of “hero”.

As I pass the half way mark as Adecco Canada’s CEO for One Month, I’ll make it my goal to bear the above characteristics in mind.
The best CEO is one that carves their own path. The best CEO is your own, authentic, self.




Employment Report – March 2017

Employment Rates

Employment was little changed in March (+19,000 or +0.1%), while the unemployment rate rose 0.1 percentage points to 6.7% as more people searched for work.

In the first quarter of 2017, employment gains totalled 83,000 or 0.5%. This growth is comparable to the last quarter of 2016 (+91,000 or +0.5%) and notably higher than the first quarter of 2016 (+36,000 or +0.2%).

Compared with 12 months earlier, employment increased by 276,000 (+1.5%), mostly in full-time work. Over the same period, the total number of hours worked rose 0.7%.

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Employment Report – February 2017

Employment Rates

Employment among women aged 25 to 54 increased for the third consecutive month, up 18,000 in February. Their unemployment rate remained at 5.3% as more women in this age group participated in the labour market. More core-aged women worked full time in the month (+84,000) and this was partly offset by fewer of them working part time (-65,000). The recent employment gains for core-aged women boosted their year-over-year employment growth to 98,000 (+1.7%).

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