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Posts from the ‘Youth Employment’ Category

Millennials Want More… Corporate Social Responsibility!

By CEO for One Month, Alana Couvrette

Millennials sometimes seem to get a bad rep as a narcissistic, entitled and self-centered generation. But is this fair to say? I don’ t think so…

For example, millennials expect more from their employers than a paycheck. They have a genuine desire to give back to communities, near and far. For them, purposeful work and the ability to create a positive impact take precedence on profit and salary. In fact, in a recent survey, it was revealed that 45% of student about to enter the workforce would even take a pay cut “for a job that makes a social or environmental impact.” They seek to work for organizations who enshrine good values and ethics into their business model.

Organizations, like Adecco, have taken note of this trend. They know that having an organization-wide aspiration to making a positive difference is part of their value-proposition for attracting and retaining the millennial talent pool.
However, trumpeting your values and ethics isn’t enough. You can’t just talk the talk… The young talent pool is eager to roll up their sleeves, get their hands dirty and participate in the efforts to improve communities near and dear to them. Organizations need to be able to offer opportunities for employees to truly engage in the change that they wish to make. Millennials seek diverse volunteerism opportunities.

At Adecco, our core values-passion, entrepreneurship, team spirit, responsibility and customer focus- permeate the whole business. As Adecco Canada’s CEO for One Month, I noticed this right away and can testify to their relevancy in our work. These values are also conveyed through our global employee engagement program, Win4Youth. This program encourages participants to clock up kilometers (through cycling, swimming or running) which are turned into donations to help disadvantaged youngsters find employment.

On June 22nd, 2017, Adecco Canada hosted their annual Solidarity Day, a day dedicated to Win4Youth. We spent the afternoon as a team running around Toronto completing a scavenger hunt filled with wacky photo ops and funny tasks. Maybe it’s just me but I didn’t even notice that we each accumulated around 9 kilometers. Multiply that by the total number of employees in the office and you’ve got a healthy donation! Curious to know how the day went? Watch this short video I made!

Still think millennials are self-centered? Deloitte’s Millennial Survey found that 7,800 young leaders from 29 different countries believe that the business world is getting it wrong. Close to 75% say that they feel businesses are “focused on their own agendas rather than improving society.”

Who’s looking self-centered now?

[1] https://www.forbes.com/sites/jeannemeister/2012/06/07/the-future-of-work-corporate-social-responsiblity-attracts-top-talent/#39aca2c33f95

[1] https://www.fastcompany.com/3046989/what-millennial-employees-really-want

A CEO is Many Things…

By CEO for One Month, Alana Couvrette

Okay I’ll admit it… Before I started my CEO for One Month journey, when I heard the word “CEO” I thought: fancy cars, private jets, exclusive access to exclusive events and, overall, someone who has the world at their fingertips.

But, in reality, a CEO is so much more than what is portrayed in the movies. I wanted to take a moment and reflect on the role of a CEO, based on my experiences as Adecco Canada’s CEO for One Month. A CEO is:

 

… a mediator
Being a CEO isn’t always glamorous. CEOs are often caught in the middle of the toughest situations and must find a way to reconcile opposing views and help parties come to an agreement. CEOs have a knack for creating the right conditions for an agreement.

… the ultimate problem solver
CEOs face the thorniest of problems. By that I mean the unresolved issues that go through multiple levels of governance before landing on their desk. They not only solve problems, but also strategically create them. Challenges help people and companies grow, and a CEO knows exactly when it’s time to push and when it’s time to heed.

… a jack of all trades and a master of them all
CEOs know their business inside out. They’re expert generalists. They navigate vastly different areas of their business with ease and confidence. They have no problem jumping from one subject area to another and they do so at a pace that is dizzying for most!

… a story teller
A CEO’s got a story for everything. Their stories serve to illustrate, engage, inspire and motivate those around them. They’ve got “past lives” that can’t quite stay in the past and they’ve worn many hats throughout their careers. CEOs entice and engage their peers with their stories, telling them how they started their businesses, what they stand for and where they’re headed.

… the boss, but not necessarily the one you’re thinking of
A CEO doesn’t have to be unapproachable or someone who makes you hold your breath when they walk by. Leadership styles can vary and no one style is better than another. Each CEO-man or woman- brings something unique to the table. This is especially important to remember for anyone thinking of taking up a leadership position: You don’t have to “be like the last CEO” to be a successful CEO.

… a mentor and is mentored
CEOs know that mentoring employees is empowering them to succeed which, in turn, makes the organization succeed. However, just because they are at the “top” doesn’t mean that CEOs do not look up to someone or something. They’re all chasing some type of “hero”.

As I pass the half way mark as Adecco Canada’s CEO for One Month, I’ll make it my goal to bear the above characteristics in mind.
The best CEO is one that carves their own path. The best CEO is your own, authentic, self.

 

 

 

Employment Report – March 2017

Employment Rates

Employment was little changed in March (+19,000 or +0.1%), while the unemployment rate rose 0.1 percentage points to 6.7% as more people searched for work.

In the first quarter of 2017, employment gains totalled 83,000 or 0.5%. This growth is comparable to the last quarter of 2016 (+91,000 or +0.5%) and notably higher than the first quarter of 2016 (+36,000 or +0.2%).

Compared with 12 months earlier, employment increased by 276,000 (+1.5%), mostly in full-time work. Over the same period, the total number of hours worked rose 0.7%.

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Employment Report – February 2017

Employment Rates

Employment among women aged 25 to 54 increased for the third consecutive month, up 18,000 in February. Their unemployment rate remained at 5.3% as more women in this age group participated in the labour market. More core-aged women worked full time in the month (+84,000) and this was partly offset by fewer of them working part time (-65,000). The recent employment gains for core-aged women boosted their year-over-year employment growth to 98,000 (+1.7%).

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Employment Report – January 2017

Employment Rates

employment-en_january

Employment rose by 48,000 (+0.3%) in January, building on gains observed in the latter part of 2016. The unemployment rate fell by 0.1 percentage points to 6.8%.

On a year-over-year basis, employment rose by 276,000 (+1.5%), with most of the increase occurring from August to January.

Following a significant increase in December, full-time employment held steady in January. Compared with 12 months earlier, full-time employment was up 86,000 (+0.6%), with increases totalling 141,000 since August.

Despite little change in January, part-time employment was up on a year-over-year basis (+190,000 or +5.6%). In January, 19.6% of employed persons worked part time, compared with 18.8% the same month a year earlier.

In the 12 months to January, the number of hours worked declined by 0.8%. In general, changes in actual hours worked reflect a number of factors, including changes in the composition of employment by full-time/part-time status, industry, occupation, age and sex.

From December to January, employment increased among core-aged men and women (25 to 54 years old). There was little overall employment change among the other demographic groups.

Compared with December, employment rose in Ontario, British Columbia, Nova Scotia and Newfoundland and Labrador. In contrast, there were fewer people working in New Brunswick. Employment was little changed in the remaining provinces.

Nearly all of the employment growth in January came from the service sector, with increases in finance, insurance, real estate, rental and leasing; business, building and other support services; transportation and warehousing; and public administration. On the other hand, there were fewer people working in information, culture and recreation.

The number of private sector employees edged up in January, while public sector employment and the number of self-employed workers were little changed.

Employment increases for the core working-age population

In January, employment for men aged 25 to 54 rose by 30,000, and their unemployment rate fell by 0.3 percentage points to 5.9%. The employment increase in January was the largest in over two years. On a year-over-year basis, gains for men in this age group totalled 69,000 (+1.1%).

Employment among women aged 25 to 54 increased for the second consecutive month, up 27,000 in January. Their unemployment rate was essentially unchanged at 5.3%. The recent gains for core-aged women boosted their year-over-year employment growth to 76,000 (+1.3%).

In January, employment among youths aged 15 to 24 was little changed on both a monthly and a year-over-year basis, while their population growth continued on a downward trend. With more youths searching for work in January, their unemployment rate increased by 0.7 percentage points to 13.3%.

Employment among men aged 55 and older was little changed in January. However, their unemployment rate decreased by 0.5 percentage points to 6.5% as fewer men in this age group searched for work. In the 12 months to January, employment among men aged 55 and older rose by 65,000 (+3.2%) and their population increased by 156,000 (+3.1%).

Employment among women aged 55 and older was also little changed in January, and their unemployment rate was 5.3%. Compared with 12 months earlier, 64,000 (+3.8%) more women aged 55 and older were working and the number of women in this age group was up by 159,000 (+2.9%).

Provincial summary

Employment in Ontario rose by 29,000 in January. The unemployment rate for the province remained at 6.4% as more people participated in the labour market. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment in Ontario was up by 90,000 (+1.3%), with all of the gains from August to January.

In January, employment increased by 11,000 in British Columbia, continuing an upward trend that began in the spring of 2015. In the 12 months to January 2017, employment increased by 82,000 or 3.5%, the fastest growth rate among the provinces. Over the same period, the unemployment rate fell by a full percentage point to 5.6%, the lowest among the provinces.

There were 4,200 more people working in Nova Scotia in January, and the unemployment rate fell by 0.6 percentage points to 7.7%. On a year-over-year basis, employment in the province increased by 9,800, partly due to the low reached in January 2016 and the fact that employment in the province has picked up recently, with most of the gains occurring since October 2016.

In Newfoundland and Labrador, there were 2,200 more people employed in January, and the unemployment rate fell by 1.3 percentage points to 13.8%. Employment in the province has been trending downward since May 2016.

Following an increase in December, employment in Quebec held steady in January. As the number of unemployed decreased (-15,000), the unemployment rate declined 0.3 percentage points to 6.2%. Compared with January 2016, employment in Quebec was up by 97,000 or 2.4%, powered by gains in the second half of 2016.

In Alberta, employment was unchanged in January, with part-time gains (+25,000) offsetting losses in full time (-24,000). The unemployment rate rose by 0.3 percentage points to 8.8%, as the number of people searching for work edged up. On a year-over-year basis, employment in Alberta was little changed.

In January, there were 3,000 fewer people working in New Brunswick, leaving employment for the province at about the same level as 12 months earlier. The unemployment rate edged down by 0.4 percentage points to 8.9%, the result of fewer people participating in the labour market.

Unemployment Rates

unemployment-en_january

Industry perspective

Employment in finance, insurance, real estate, rental and leasing increased by 21,000 in January, bringing gains from 12 months earlier to 59,000 (+5.3%), with most of this increase concentrated in the last six months.

There were 16,000 more people working in business, building and other support services in January. On a year-over-year basis, employment in this industry was little changed.

In January, employment was also up in transportation and warehousing (+11,000), contributing to an increase of 23,000 (+2.5%) from 12 months earlier.

Employment in public administration rose by 7,800 in January, bringing total gains to 52,000 (+5.7%) from 12 months earlier. Over this period, gains were strongest at the local, municipal and regional level, with increases also observed at the federal and provincial levels.

Information, culture and recreation employment declined by 13,000 in January. Compared with January 2016, employment in the industry edged up 21,000 (+2.8%).

The number of private sector employees edged up in January (+32,000), building on the strong growth in the second half of 2016. In the 12 months to January, the number of private sector employees rose by 257,000 (+2.2%), with increases in a number of service sector industries as well as construction.

Both public sector employment and the number of self-employed workers were little changed in January. On a year-over-year basis, the number of public sector employees rose by 68,000 (+1.9%), the result of additional employment in public administration and information, culture and recreation. Self-employment edged down over the same period.

Canada–United States comparison

Adjusted to the concepts used in the United States, the unemployment rate in Canada was 5.7% in January, compared with 4.8% in the United States. In the 12 months to January, the unemployment rate fell by 0.5 percentage points in Canada, while it was little changed in the United States (-0.1 percentage points).

In January, the labour force participation rate was 65.8% in Canada (adjusted to US concepts) and 62.9% in the United States. The participation rate in Canada was unchanged compared with 12 months earlier, while it increased slightly in the United States (+0.2 percentage points).

The US-adjusted employment rate in Canada stood at 62.1% in January, compared with 59.9% in the United States. On a year-over-year basis, the employment rate rose by 0.4 percentage points in Canada and by 0.3 percentage points in the United States.

Historical perspective on the Canadian labour market

As 2017 marks the 150th anniversary of Confederation, we take a brief look at the history of the Canadian Labour Force Survey (LFS).

After the Second World War, Canada experienced massive changes as the country transitioned from a war economy to a peace economy. The LFS was designed to meet the need for reliable and timely data on Canada’s labour market conditions. It started as a quarterly survey in November 1945 and has been a monthly survey since November 1952, producing leading economic indicators each month, such as the employment rate and the unemployment rate.

In 1946, the employment rate was 53.1%, increasing to 61.1% in 2016, as a result of a number of factors, most notably higher labour force participation among women over the course of this period.

The unemployment rate more than doubled during the history of the LFS, from 3.4% in 1946 to 7.0% in 2016. There was variation over time due to historical and economic factors. The unemployment rate was higher during periods of economic downturns, reaching a high during the recession of the 1980s. It was lowest during the post-war period of the late 1940s.

Source: Statistics Canada

Webinar: How to answer the 15 most common interview questions

  This year marks a significant shift in the workforce. Millennials now represent the largest percentage of the workforce for the very first time, with 28% already sitting in management positions and 2/3 seeing themselves in management roles within the next ten years. As more millennials assume management positions, you may be noticing changes in […]

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