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A CEO is Many Things…

By CEO for One Month, Alana Couvrette

Okay I’ll admit it… Before I started my CEO for One Month journey, when I heard the word “CEO” I thought: fancy cars, private jets, exclusive access to exclusive events and, overall, someone who has the world at their fingertips.

But, in reality, a CEO is so much more than what is portrayed in the movies. I wanted to take a moment and reflect on the role of a CEO, based on my experiences as Adecco Canada’s CEO for One Month. A CEO is:

 

… a mediator
Being a CEO isn’t always glamorous. CEOs are often caught in the middle of the toughest situations and must find a way to reconcile opposing views and help parties come to an agreement. CEOs have a knack for creating the right conditions for an agreement.

… the ultimate problem solver
CEOs face the thorniest of problems. By that I mean the unresolved issues that go through multiple levels of governance before landing on their desk. They not only solve problems, but also strategically create them. Challenges help people and companies grow, and a CEO knows exactly when it’s time to push and when it’s time to heed.

… a jack of all trades and a master of them all
CEOs know their business inside out. They’re expert generalists. They navigate vastly different areas of their business with ease and confidence. They have no problem jumping from one subject area to another and they do so at a pace that is dizzying for most!

… a story teller
A CEO’s got a story for everything. Their stories serve to illustrate, engage, inspire and motivate those around them. They’ve got “past lives” that can’t quite stay in the past and they’ve worn many hats throughout their careers. CEOs entice and engage their peers with their stories, telling them how they started their businesses, what they stand for and where they’re headed.

… the boss, but not necessarily the one you’re thinking of
A CEO doesn’t have to be unapproachable or someone who makes you hold your breath when they walk by. Leadership styles can vary and no one style is better than another. Each CEO-man or woman- brings something unique to the table. This is especially important to remember for anyone thinking of taking up a leadership position: You don’t have to “be like the last CEO” to be a successful CEO.

… a mentor and is mentored
CEOs know that mentoring employees is empowering them to succeed which, in turn, makes the organization succeed. However, just because they are at the “top” doesn’t mean that CEOs do not look up to someone or something. They’re all chasing some type of “hero”.

As I pass the half way mark as Adecco Canada’s CEO for One Month, I’ll make it my goal to bear the above characteristics in mind.
The best CEO is one that carves their own path. The best CEO is your own, authentic, self.

 

 

 

My First Week as Adecco Canada’s First CEO1Month

By Alana Couvrette

If you have 30 seconds….

During my first week as Adecco Canada’s CEO for One Month, I:
1. Visited Adecco’s Laval and Montreal branch
2. Networked with clients during the Lead breakfast
3. Asked the President of Adecco Canada probably over 100 questions
4. Filmed a 24 hour in my life video
5. Saw Cirque du Soleil’s Volta
6. And, spent half of my Sunday in an elevator (I am claustrophobic…details to come)

If you have five minutes…

Students, like myself, are well accustomed to seeing the workplace from the “bottoms up” point of view. Interaction with senior management is, to put it frankly, a rarity. During my past co-op terms, I remember vividly asking myself “Who’s up there” and “What do they do exactly”? Ultimately, it was my curiosity that led me to apply for the CEO for One Month contest.

On my first day, I learned that the new Canadian President had set himself an ambitious task: to visit all of Adecco’s branches in Canada during his first few months. So, naturally, I had to follow suit. I visited both the Laval and Montreal branches and met with the staff, who engage with associates on a day to day basis. These meetings proved to be fruitful, as I left with a greater understanding of what Adecco does at the ground level “the foundation of its business”. This was nicely complemented by the Lēad breakfast, where I got to network with some of our clients and got a feel for the HR Industry.

After our branch visits, I had the opportunity to see Cirque du Soleil’s (one of our largest clients) Volta performance. The things that the human body can do baffles me! I can’t even touch my toes and here I was watching people put their feet behind their heads. After this performance, I realized that I must find a way to squeeze in some exercise in my CEO schedule. I did, however, find the time to strap on a GoPro to my head, in the hopes of filming a “24 hours in my day” video. Stay tuned for the result!

Of course, I also spent a lot of time with Gilbert Boileau, Adecco Canada President. From the moment, I stepped into his office, I found myself already working on a project. My intuition told me, right then and there, that a great month was to come. I sat in on phone calls, attended meetings and traveled with Gilbert. However, what I enjoyed the most was the time we had in between meetings and phone calls. Coming from a public administration and political science background, some business terms were unfamiliar and Gilbert kindly took the time to explain them to me. We also took part in engaging discussions (is it fair to say debates) on the talent industry, the job market and even politics.

As you may or may not know, although I have been selected as the 2017 Adecco Canada CEO for One Month, I am also in the running towards becoming the Adecco Groups’ Global Leadership CEO for One Month. The Adecco Group revealed we would participate in challenges for this role. The first challenge to all 48 CEOs for One Month was announced mid-way through my first week, an “elevator pitch” in an elevator. Did I mention that I am both claustrophobic and have a fear of elevators?

Week one went by in a flash but I did make sure to capture some moments through photos.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you have more than five minutes…

Follow me on Twitter @alana_couvrette, Instagram @alana.couvrette, Facebook- https://www.facebook.com/alana.couvrette or follow my hashtag #AlanaC1M for daily content.

Vote for who you think deserves a spot at the Global Leadership Bootcamp bit.ly/2rhvQ0n. But, before you do, be sure to check out my elevator pitch on Youtube. I’ll let you do the judging…

Week Two: bring it on!

Triathlons Made Me a Better Employee

My legs are on fire; they feel so heavy. My mouth is chalk-dry, I’m extremely thirsty. People around me are cheering but the noise is so intense that I can’t distinguish the voices. A bell rings continuously, as if someone is trying to gain my attention. My body leans dangerously forward. I raise my head to catch my balance. The side of my face is so hot; the sweat is burning my skin! To my right, I see children cheering and wanting a high-five. Far ahead, I see a woman holding up a sign, “How did you get those great legs?” Next to her is a man with a sign that reads, “You can do this!” I sport a huge smile, despite the pain. After 1.9 km of swimming, 90 km of cycling and 21 km of running, I cross the finish line of my first half IRONMAN (70.3) triathlon race.

Why? Why not!

I began training for triathlons a few years ago and I quickly found that it’s not just a sport, but a way of life. As a triathlete, I’ve become more aware of who I am and I’ve developed skills and personality traits that have transcended into my career and personal life.

Humility

I began training for triathlons as a novice athlete. I felt exasperated during my first few outings especially during the first swim challenge. As I got over this hurdle, the experience taught me a lot. I learned to be humble, to challenge myself and to work better within a team.

These skills have helped in my work environment too! I’ve became more empathetic towards new employees, I’ve learned to overcome work obstacles and to work effectively with my team.

Goal Oriented

Triathlons teach us to set goals, to go faster, and to go further. There are individuals that have lost their passion, given up, or have stopped setting life goals. They may continue to dream, but they’ve quit working towards their goals or specific timelines. They tell themselves “when I have the time, I’d like to…”, but they never seem to make the time.

The triathlon motivates individuals into setting goals and becoming achievers.  To finish what they start, and persevere until they reach their goal.  Triathletes don’t put off till tomorrow, what they can do today.

Self-honesty and Self Motivation

Triathletes learn quickly to know themselves and face the truth.  For instance, you’ve finished a race and the time on your watch is below your expectations, you realize you have to motivate yourself to try harder the next time. You can’t be someone that ends your spinning training 5-10 minutes early by convincing yourself you will do it next session. It’s about being honest with yourself.  It’s about seizing the moment.  It’s about learning to be self-motivated and not only setting your goals, but seeing them through.

The skills gained will allow you to be forthright and motivated to get the job done.

Energy and Productivity

Employees who are involved in sports have more energy and are less likely to become ill. According to a study by Goodwill, “a sedentary individual who starts practicing a sport at work will increase his or her productivity by 6% – 9%.[1]. Employers see “a 1% – 14% increase in net productivity.”[2] Thus, it pays to be athletic! Need I say more?

IRONMAN quote:

“There are two types of people, those who say I CAN’T and those who say I CAN!”

Which one are you?

Why Participate in Win4Youth

The Adecco’s Win4Youth program allows employees and clients to log their km when they take part in sports events during their free time. The km are then turned into donations supporting disadvantaged youngsters, children and their families around the globe. In eight years, this initiative has raised €2 million for various charity organizations.

Win4Youth provides employees with the opportunity to get healthy and share quality time with their peers and family members. By encouraging one another to exercise, we work together towards a common goal. It is not just about the organizations profitability but about helping the less fortunate and creating a wonderful team experience.

So, are you convinced? I hope so! See you next time at the track, in the pool or on the bike path!

Happy training,

Pierre-Luc

Pierre-Luc Pérusse is the Branch Manager for Adecco’s Quebec City branch. He helps organizations attract the best talent and leads a team of innovative recruiters. With over 5 years of experience in the staffing industry, Pierre-Luc believes a recruiter’s greatest asset is his personality and his ability to build relationships. Heading into his thirties, he likes to juggle challenges: young family, career, IRONMAN – he is always ready for the next one. A graduate of the Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières’s Human Resources program, Pierre-Luc enjoys sharing his passion for the field on social media.

 

[1] http://www.travail-prevention-sante.fr/mediatheque/8/2/1/000001128.pdf

[2] http://www.travail-prevention-sante.fr/mediatheque/8/2/1/000001128.pdf

 

Share your Win4Youth story on Social Media and make sure to hashtag ##Win4Youth.

Employment Report – March 2017

Employment Rates

Employment was little changed in March (+19,000 or +0.1%), while the unemployment rate rose 0.1 percentage points to 6.7% as more people searched for work.

In the first quarter of 2017, employment gains totalled 83,000 or 0.5%. This growth is comparable to the last quarter of 2016 (+91,000 or +0.5%) and notably higher than the first quarter of 2016 (+36,000 or +0.2%).

Compared with 12 months earlier, employment increased by 276,000 (+1.5%), mostly in full-time work. Over the same period, the total number of hours worked rose 0.7%.

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Employment Report – February 2017

Employment Rates

Employment among women aged 25 to 54 increased for the third consecutive month, up 18,000 in February. Their unemployment rate remained at 5.3% as more women in this age group participated in the labour market. More core-aged women worked full time in the month (+84,000) and this was partly offset by fewer of them working part time (-65,000). The recent employment gains for core-aged women boosted their year-over-year employment growth to 98,000 (+1.7%).

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The Future of Women in STEM: A Multifaceted Approach

 

Katie Bieber is an IT Recruitment Consultant in Roevin’s Edmonton branch. She brings over three yearKatieBiebers of professional experience to her role and in Edmonton’s tech sector.  Katie focuses on clients in the IT realm and has developed exceptional connections and a network of candidates in the STEM field. She works with many passionate and pioneering candidates who overcome impressive hurdles as the only women applying for a role or being the only women on a team. Their perseverance and success have inspired her own passion for promoting women in the tech arena.


With March being National Engineering Month – coupled with International Women’s Day falling on March 8th — Adecco is continuing our look at the underrepresentation of women in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) fields.

The topic has become an increasingly important point of discussion. Various government bodies, reports, studies, organizations, mission statements and think tanks have explored it in recent years.  The problem has almost unanimous support — both from diversity advocates and the STEM sector itself. In 2010,  Natural Sciences and Engineer Research Council of Canada (NSERC) released an 84-page report on Women in Science and Engineering in Canada which explored the “under-representation of women in the various fields of science and engineering” and noted that this long-recognized problem was “of concern to the…NSERC”.

Are women really underrepresented in STEM?

Undeniably, yes!

WomeninSTEM_infographic

According to the 2011 National Household Survey, women accounted for only 39% of university graduates aged 25-34 with a STEM degree, compared with 66% of university graduates in non-STEM programs.  Moreover, the percentage of women working in the fields has barely changed in 30 years. In 1987, 20% of the STEM workforce were women. Today, it is still only 22%.

And as NSERC pointed out in their report, “Virtually all countries in the world, to varying levels, have fewer women than men studying in the NSE” (natural sciences and engineering).

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