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Posts from the ‘Career Advice’ Category

10 Things To Know When You Are Being Let Go!

by Kate Toner, Government Proposal Writer, The Adecco Group, Canada

The words are still hanging in the air because your brain is scrambling to comprehend them.

Completely unsuspected, the unthinkable is happening.  The thing that happens to other people, not to you.  The hushed tale told by a friend about a mutual acquaintance to which you shake your head and commiserate with a, “how terrible for them”.

Your ear listens to a myriad of other words being uttered and grasps the phrase, “it has nothing to do with your work.”

Your brain, now beating back the enzymes triggered by stress, pauses, looks towards your ear and nods in agreement.

“We will, of course, provide you an exceptional reference.”

Your brain on high alert now—functioning at optimal levels to control not only your hearing but potential inappropriate responses to stress—FREEZES.

YOU ARE BEING LET GO!

Now as a matter of course, it will seem as though your brain has stopped functioning entirely.  This, however, is very untrue.  Your brain is in the fight of its life assigning the correct emotional responses to these events, to ensure acceptable and appropriate behaviours are attributed to each particular and subsequent unfolding moment.

Still attempting to reign in your emotions, your brain will start firing inappropriate questions off the walls of your cranium.  “What about Joe Smith? Is Joe Smith being let go too? Is my entire department being let go?  Is it just me?  Is this really happening?!?!?!?”

However, these are not the questions your brain should be asking.  The questions your brain should be asking, it will only present to you in hindsight.  This will be true for the vast majority unless perhaps:  a) you have been through this situation before; b) someone close to you (like a spouse or friend) has told you in great detail about their own experience; or c) you happen to remember a blog you read on this very topic!

Your employer is letting you go.  What are the ten things you should ask or do?

  1. Ask for time to review anything before signing.

Being let go from your place of employment is a stressful experience with an immediate and natural emotional response.  If you are being asked to sign a document that has a lot of detail, or you want to ensure you understand it fully before agreeing to any terms, you should ask to take the document with you to read in a later state of calm—or perhaps after you have consulted a lawyer, the Employment Standards Act (ESA) in your province; or Federal Employment Standards (whichever applies to your employer’s jurisdiction). Many companies will provide you the time to do so, but with a specified date of when a response is expected from you.

If you feel confident in signing at that particular moment, for example if the document is only confirming that you have been advised of the company’s decision to let you go, but not necessarily agreeing to any terms, be sure to get a copy of the document you signed.

  1. Find out your end date.

Is the expectation that you are being walked off the premises directly after you have been told your employment is ending?  Depending on the company’s policy, you may request to pick up personal belongings from your desk, or make arrangements to come back after hours.  Be prepared to have a company representative with you as you pack up your things. Alternatively you could request that your employer go and get the items you need for that day, and agree to send your remaining personal items to your home address.

In some situations you may be asked to work through a notice period.  Some questions to ask should be around expectations during this time. Are you going to be providing a transfer of knowledge?  If you are client facing, are you expected to keep or cancel any meetings you had previously scheduled?

Additionally, it is important to know your exact end date in regards to your final pay.  Some companies may consider you still as an employee while receiving any payments which may impact the beginning of your Employment Insurance (EI) benefits (if you are entitled to them).

  1. Ask if you will be considered for future employment with the company?

The role you are being let go from may simply cease to exist, your duties may be absorbed into another department.  It is beneficial to clarify, especially if there is the possibility of another role in a different department or another location with the same company.  Some companies have a policy not to rehire staff that has been let go, regardless of the circumstances.

  1. Are you getting any payments? How much and for how long?

This is an important financial planning question, because any payments made to you can also impact your Employment Insurance (EI) Benefits at the same time.  Any payments you do receive will be taken into account by Service Canada.  So while you may register for Employment Insurance, it may be a while before the Government deems it necessary to provide EI to you based any ongoing payments you are receiving from the employer.

Your payment information should be outlined in the letter/documentation you received. You may want to consult a lawyer, your province’s Employment Standards Act (ESA), or the Federal Employment Standards to ensure you are receiving the correct termination payments in accordance with legislation.

  1. What date will you be paid?

Your date of final payment should be in accordance with provincial legislation.  Clarify with your employer when this will be, or check your local employment standards/labour code.

  1. What happens to commissions/bonus?

In some roles, your job may be a base salary plus a commission (sometimes referred to as a bonus) structure.  Find out what happens to your commissions; when your commissions will be paid out; or if they will be prorated.

  1. When will your health insurance benefits end?

Generally the majority of current benefit entitlements are required by employment standards to continue during your notice period.  You may want to speak to your HR department or the person responsible regarding insurance to clarify the policy’s terms and conditions.

  1. Will there be outplacement services?

While in Canada there is no legislation requiring an employer to provide outplacement services, some companies do offer outplacement services (potentially through a third party) as a means to ease your transition.  Outplacement services may include career counselling, re-orientation into the job market, advice on resume writing and/or interviewing techniques, etc.  This is beneficial if you have been a long-term employee and are entering the job market for the first time in a number of years.

  1. When will you receive your Record of Employment (ROE)? Follow-up!

The Record of Employment (ROE) is mandatory in establishing a claim for Employment Insurance (EI) benefits.  Service Canada uses the information provided on the ROE to determine whether you are eligible to receive EI benefits, the amount of the benefits you are entitled to, and the length of time the benefits will be provided to you.  You are able to register for EI without your ROE, however your EI eligibility will not be determined until Service Canada’s receipt of the ROE.  Your employer may choose to send the ROE directly to Service Canada electronically after your notice period ends rather than during.  Now if you are in a case where there is a notice period, but you are not required to work all of it, you may want to follow-up with your employer when the ROE will be sent in.

Alternately if you can get a copy of the ROE from your employer, do so—the copy will be used by Service Canada until the electronic copy from your employer is received.  You can register the required information so Service Canada can make the above determinations regarding your file and EI eligibility without delay.

  1. File for Employment Insurance (EI) Benefits immediately.

Even if you believe you are highly employable and will not require EI, the process of looking for new employment can take longer than you might expect.  You will still have living costs to deal with while waiting for a potential employer to make you an offer, or provide you a start date if an employment offer has been made.  If you are eligible for EI benefits, file right away.  Remember that filing for EI can be done without receipt of your Record of Employment, but your assessment will not be completed by Service Canada until the ROE is received.

Registering for Employment Insurance Benefits can be done online at Service Canada’s site:  https://www.canada.ca; or in person at the Service Canada location nearest you.

Remember…

Being “let go” is a temporary state (especially if you proactively look for another place of employment).

Talk to people you trust, or to your friends and/or family.  You will be amazed by the stories you hear and the number of people you know who have been in the exact same situation—all of whom have survived and thrived, you will too.

Potentially, this can be viewed as a new opportunity for you.  Perhaps you will decide to go back to school, or travel, or become an entrepreneur.  Being let go from your job may become the catalyst for a new and exciting time in your life.

Don’t view being let go as an ending because the most important truth about the situation is so much better than that …it is a beginning!

 

Kate Toner is a Government Proposal Writer in Adecco’s Head Office.  She possesses over 17 years of professional business writing experience in the staffing industry, 16 years of which were dedicated to the information technology staffing field.  Kate’s focus on government contracts during that time has honed her business writing skills and aided in winning multiple standing offers, supply arrangements, vendor of records, and preferred status with numerous public sector clients and broader public sector clients.  Celebrating her first year with Adecco in June 2017, Kate is passionate about the power of the written word and its importance in business communications.

Disclaimer

The above is not legal advice, nor is it intended to replace legal advice.  Various industries must comply with provincial employment standards, however, some industries are required to follow federal employment standards.  An employee, in event of being let go from their employment, should always refer to the official legislated version of Employment Standards Act (ESA) regulations in their Province or at the Federal level.  Check with your provincial Ministry of Labour or the Canadian Government for the updated version of the ESA which can be found online in most regions. Please also note that if you are a unionized worker you will also wish to check with your Union Representative to understand your rights under your collective agreement which may have additional standards for employers to adhere to.  Find out which applies to your employer and contact an employment lawyer in order to know your legal rights. 

Networking is a Game Changer in Helping with your Job Search

Why network? In today’s business world networking has become a big deal. Meeting people who can provide mentorship or at least put you in touch with individuals that can steer you in the right direction is key to success in a job search or even when running your own business. For some, it’s very natural to meet new people and develop relationships but for others it can be challenging even terrifying at times. Networking is like a garden that requires supervision and maintenance to deliver you success. So how do you become a successful networker? There’s really no real science to it. It’s getting yourself out there and just doing it.

Join clubs, groups and meet people who have similar interests. Volunteer or attend a fundraiser that you are enthusiastic about. Having similar interests will make it easier for you to get involved and immerse yourself in the activity, which will allow you to be more available to the people around you. You need to be visible in order to meet people. Connection is the key to building a strong network. So don’t go home right after work, go out for dinner with colleagues, attend local events, conferences and networking events.

Building trust is another key variable to building a good network. You have to cultivate real, deep relationships with your contacts before you can ask them for a favour or expect them to help you find a job. Building confidence with your network takes an investment of time on your part. Remember, people who don’t really know you, won’t refer or promote you.

Having a diverse network is also a key factor in building a strong solid network. You need to look beyond your connections and get to know people who are not like you, who are not in your industry, or social group. This means expanding outside of your comfort zone to meet diverse people. By diversifying your network, you can meet the connectors who can put you in touch with individuals that can point you to the road that leads to success.

Be open to asking genuine and thought-provoking questions. Also, prepare yourself to do more of the listening by allowing the other person to do most of the talking. This will help you understand them better and give them a positive feeling about your exchange. This will not only help you gain more information about the person but it will also give you details about them that you can use for follow-up conversations at a later date. Be open to joining a conversation during a break and introducing yourself. Most people are okay with being interrupted and it gives them a chance to meet someone new. If the conversation seems too serious, you can politely excuse yourself and move on.

Consider how you can help others but drawing connections within your own network. You might have the opportunity to be the matchmaker yourself and introduce your contacts in their service or industry to these new networks. Make sure to follow through with both parties to find out what happened with their interaction. It can help you out in the future and also allow you work on your “connector” skills.

Now you are one step closer to becoming an expert networker.

Happy Networking!

By Andrea Theophilos, Social Media Marketing, Adecco Canada

Andrea Theophilos manages Adecco Canada’s social media platforms. She possesses over 18 years of marketing and event management experience and has worked in various industries that include travel, government, healthcare, finance and staffing. 

Canada Ranks 13th in the 2017 Global Talent Competitiveness Index

gtci-2017-full-reportThe Adecco Group has once again partnered with INSEAD and the Human Capital Leadership Institute to produce the Global Talent Competitiveness Index (GTCI) — an annual benchmarking report that ranks 118 countries according to their ability to grow, attract and retain talent.

Launched for the first time in 2013, The GTCI provides a tool-kit for governments, businesses, organizations and personnel throughout the world to prepare them for the future of work. Its wealth of data and analysis is intended to help countries overcome talent mismatches and be competitive in the global marketplace.

Why is talent so important?

Talent has become the ‘currency’ of the global labour market and therefore something that decision makers in business, policy and academia need to understand in depth.

Talent is increasingly becoming the subject of intense debate, and these arguments are not simply about skills shortages. Talent competitiveness lies at the heart of important societal issues, such as unemployment, immigration, education and economic growth — whether in the context of restoring post-crisis prosperity, creating jobs for the young, maintaining momentum in high-growth economies or lifting entire nations out of poverty.

The global workforce must recognize the skills they will need for the future, governments must understand how they can secure the right to work for their citizen and countries need to ensure they remain competitive in the global economy.

What global talent trends have emerged?

The 2017 study focuses on how technology is affecting talent competitiveness and the nature of work, exploring both significant challenges and opportunities, and important shifts away from traditional working approaches.

trends

 

Read more

Hackathons: An Innovative Trend That Can “Shortcut” IT Recruitment

hackathon

laura-tarrant_headshot_finalLaura Tarrant is a Senior Account Executive for Roevin Technology— Adecco’s specialized IT division. Laura’s focus on IT recruitment and career coaching has led her to become a true expert in the field. Her monthly blogs dedicated to the IT field receive 2,400 followers from within the technology industry.  She understands that talent is more than just a skill set; her innovative and engaging recruitment strategies minimize inefficiencies of the recruiting life cycle while delivering stellar IT talent to her clients.

Below, Laura provides Adecco Lēad Blog readers with cutting edge IT recruitment trends.

Many innovative companies—particularly those in tech—rely on hiring big-picture thinkers to propel their organizations forward and keep them on the cutting edge. Many, unfortunately, are experiencing a technical talent shortage. In order to capture talent that thinks outside the box, employers need to implement creative recruitment tactics to match.  One such method that has proven incredibly successful and popular in recent years is the hackathon!

What are hackathons? They sound sinister…

Despite their name, there is nothing dubious about them. Started in Silicon Valley, hackathons are usually two-day (or sometimes week-long) networking events where like-minded people gather to solve development or organizational problems, grow their knowledge and produce impressive technology.  Many are hosted by think-tanks, tech companies, incubators, NGOs or major corporations. Brilliant young developers, designers and systems architects take part while industry veterans judge their work. Savvy recruiters and employers can take advantage of these events by connecting with both sets of attendees.

Why are they useful for recruitment?

They are an inexpensive recruitment strategy which can give you access to on-a-dime interviews with a variety of brilliant technical talent, let you see their soft skills and problem-solving abilities “in the wild” and get a sense of how they will perform on the job. In fact, many participants take part precisely to impress recruiters or employers who may be monitoring the event. Often, a job position or internship is marketed as the “prize” for taking part!

In addition to the recruitment and networking opportunities these events offer, hackathons can be held internally to introduce fun, creativity and competition into otherwise non-stimulating workplace processes.

Below is a peek into the types of hackathons that have become popular, tips for tech candidates on taking part and advice for employers and recruiters on sponsoring existing hackathons or organizing their own.

Virtual Hackathons

Virtual hackathons take place online and often for the purpose of sourcing international talent.  During these hackathons, participants are given programming concepts to contemplate or a programming challenge to solve—allthewhile competing for the overall title of “champion” and a spot on the leaderboard.

Recruitment Perspective: Organizations are given an inside look at how developers, scientists, students, entrepreneurs and educators from around the world approach problem-solving and compete against each other. If you are a small team with a limited budget—but have the ability to advertise and create brand awareness overseas—this recruitment ‘hack’ is highly recommended for your recruitment efforts.

Tip: For step-by-step instructions on attending and setting up a virtual hackathon, visit: http://www.the-hackfest.com/tips-virtual/

Interactive Hackathons

Interactive hackathons are conducted at pre-defined locations and begin with a presentation about the rules and theme of the event. Attendees are giving an opportunity to brief participants on a project they are working on with an obstacle they need help overcoming. Talent in this battle-of-the-brains ranges from “junior” to “subject-matter experts” who join together to unlock problems and suggest ideas while working in teams based on their individual interests and skills. At the conclusion of an interactive hackathon, a collaborative wrap-up session gives each team a chance to present and explain their findings, execution and achievements.

Recruitment Perspective: Let’s face it—traditional interviews with developers don’t always reveal how a candidate will fit into a company’s culture or if they will succeed in a real-time work environment. Interactive hackathons not only offer the ability to discover these unknowns, they are a less intimidating approach to recruitment and give employers the opportunity to perform on-a-dime interviews while networking with upcoming talent.

Tip: For a step-by-step guide on successfully running an interactive hackathon visit: https://hackathon.guide/

In-House Hackathons

As mentioned, hackathons are not exclusive to external recruitment efforts. They can be a great way for your staff to tackle an organizational problem together, solve development challenges or address your clients’ issues.  Your employees can also use them to prove their skills, management abilities and try out new roles. It’s no wonder that internal hackathons are increasingly being used by major corporations such as Manulife, Deloitte and many others.

If you’d like to administer your own internal hackathon, start by coming up with a project collectively and then setting up small teams of 2-5 employees.  Deliver the challenge and watch as the creative juices begin to flow. Fight the temptation to direct your team on how to do things during this event. While it may be hard to resist, you will boost participation by allowing your team to have a hand in every detail along the way to the solution.  By utilizing internal hackathons, you will foster a work environment that breeds innovation and challenges employees to build things creatively without a specific roadmap.

HR Perspective: Never underestimate your ability to unleash the hidden talents of your internal teams. Hackathons work as a tool for getting one’s feet wet into new ways of thinking.  They spark innovation, foster trust, engage employees, strengthen communication, encourage interaction and build strong collaborative teams who work towards a common goal. When a solution is constructed together, it is much more likely to stick.

Tip: For a step-by-step on running your first in-house hackathon visit: https://stormpath.com/blog/running-your-first-internal-hackathon

In today’s “Talent War”—in which people change jobs frequently, competition is global, salaries are competitive and opportunities are everywhere—smart, tech-savvy, agile workers are highly in demand, yet hard to recruit. Companies want to hire the best and brightest but rarely devise an innovative hiring process to make them stand out from other potential employers.  Hackathons can be a great tool in your arsenal to get you the forward-thinking IT talent you’re seeking.

Get more IT recruitment tips from Laura on Twitter @Recruiter_4_You and LinkedIn.

Employment Allies: How Recruiters Help Shape a Positive Impression of a Candidate

When working with a recruiter for the first time, it’s common for applicants to feel a little hesitant or unsure. Many job seekers are used to traditional ways of applying for jobs—hand-delivering resumes, searching job boards, applying online and following up with Hiring Managers. While these may be perfectly acceptable methods for landing a great job, there are ways of making your job search more efficient—and using a reputable Recruitment Agency is one of the best approaches out there. In an ever-increasing online landscape where employers have access to qualified candidates across the country (and often—the world), you need a personal advocate to shine a spotlight on your unique profile, skill set and fit for a company.

An experienced and specialized recruiter is an invaluable asset for your job hunt. They can help shape an employers’ positive impression of you through myriad ways:

They know how to “sell” you to their clients

Recruiters have strong and long-standing relationships with their clients (the very organizations with whom you’re looking to secure a job). They understand exactly what Hiring Managers look for when reviewing an applicant—the keywords that jump out at them and the deal breakers that make them turn away. This allows the recruiter to recommend small adjustments, diction and format changes to your resume and profile to ensure they meet their client’s expectations and starts their impression of you off on the right foot.

Employers trust their recommendations from previous successes

It’s a recruiter’s job to intimately understand the types of candidates their clients are after, the skill sets that lead to success in their roles and the personality traits that are needed in their organization. Based on previous hires, the client has good faith in a recruiter’s ability to know their business and company culture, and secure lasting candidates that fit within it. Employers take a second look at a resume they would otherwise pass on when presented by a recruiter they trust.

They act as a “live” cover page for candidates

Have you ever submitted an online application and wished you could have a direct conversation with the Hiring Manager about why you are the perfect fit? Well, that is exactly what recruiters are hired to do! Recruiters spend their time getting to know the candidates they work with—above and beyond checkboxes on an application—and have an ear with the client when it comes time to advocating for a good match. Recruiters present clients with complete candidate profiles and make personalized recommendations of best-fit candidates. They can speak to your education, experience, professionalism, presentation and personality traits, and mitigate any shortcomings you may have “on paper”. This makes all the difference for getting talented candidates through the door.

Career Builder, 2016

Career Builder, 2016

Additional benefits that recruiters provide to job seekers include:

  • Knowledge of company culture: Based on previous placements, site visits and communication with Hiring Managers, recruiters are able to give you an inside look into an employer’s culture and values—information otherwise not available to candidates.
  • Interview tips: Recruiters can prepare candidates on commonly asked interview questions, go over employers’ priorities, recommend appropriate attire and suggest which documentation to bring to the interview. They’re also a dedicated point of contact for all your interview questions and concerns. When you come prepared and dress like you already belong, it helps employers envision you working there. And recruiters can help with that prep!
  • Salary negotiation: Recruiters from leading Staffing Firms have access to the research reports, national salary guides and internal pay databases their companies put together. Top firms even offer their recruiters training on professional negotiation techniques. They study fair market compensation and go to work to negotiate a salary that meets both your expectations and their client’s pay range (and as experts, can even successfully persuade clients to raise it).
  • Assistance on job preparation & training: Based on the position’s requirements, recruiters can administer testing that identifies your strengths and weaknesses, your personality profile and your work style in a team environment. Recruiters can then offer online training or refresher courses to strengthen your knowledge. At Adecco, we provide free online training course to all our Associates on various software, customer service & office skills, health & safety, and many others. Your resume gets a boost from these new courses and you come off as an expert when it’s time for the interview.
  • Feedback from previous placements: Recruiters can share insider tips and tricks they learned from past candidates they’ve placed with a company. This can help you have a smooth transition into your new role and company, and set you up for success.

Recruiters are experts at cutting through a slurry of applicants and identifying the most suitable handful who will exceed expectations, gel with the company culture and excel in a role. For all these reasons, recruiters are true allies of both candidates and employers alike.

The Permanence of Temporary Labour: Learn the Benefits & Advantages

Temporary workers. Contractors. Freelancers. Associates. No matter what they’re referred to, contract workers are a large and important part of many businesses, industries and Canada’s workforce as a whole.

Let’s take a moment to consider the benefits and importance of temporary labour to Canadian families, businesses and the economy.

Temporary labour:

  • Helps industries meet production quotas and seasonal ramps. Many industries (including Agriculture, Hospitality, Logistics, Manufacturing, IT and the Broader Public Sector) rely on a mix of permanent and contract workers to meet seasonal peaks and ramp ups based on client or market demand, as well as to hire for project-based assignments. Without temporary workers, entire industries and businesses wouldn’t be able to meet these demands. High volume hiring during peak periods creates jobs for over 2 million Canadians and lets businesses grow and compete—further creating employment opportunities when businesses are able to expand.
  • Provides flexibility all around. Not only do businesses require flexibility in scheduling to accommodate periodically extended hours, shift-work, off-hour projects, fluctuating production plans and changing demands, but workers increasingly prefer flexibility in work schedules as well. Study after study has found that younger workers favour flexible work hours, but employers are learning that employees of all ages prefer more flexible schedules too! Parents need the flexibility to schedule their work around PA days, school vacations, doctor’s visits and extracurricular activities. Freelancers love the option of working periodically in between personal or side projects. Many employees are also pursuing continuing education and training, and need the flexibility to accommodate class times, work and school assignment deadlines. And Gen X’ers know far too well the demands that come with being the sandwich generation; taking care of children and aging parents while working a typical 9-5 has many feeling strained. Employees of all generations want flexible work hours with the ability to ramp up and down as their needs change, achieve work-life balance and choose their own schedules. And businesses need the flexibility to meet their varying scheduling and seasonal requirements. Contract hiring fulfills both of their needs.
  • Exposes employees to varied workplaces and industries. When looking at a stack of resumes (or results from a keyword crawler), Hiring Managers focus on 3 sections: the applicant’s experience, technical know-how, and their “soft skills”. Working for different employers, across varied industries and holding several job titles is a fantastic way to strengthen all 3! Accepting contract roles gives employees a first-hand feel for diverse businesses and roles—all the while growing their experience and skills, and reducing “employment gaps” on their resumes. Taking on a contract assignment also lets first-time or transitioning workers “try on” different positions and responsibilities before deciding which fit their needs best. This can be especially beneficial for individuals with unique and sought-after skills who want to try out multiple employers before committing to one that will give them exactly what they’re looking for. It also allows workers an opportunity to get in with a particular employer who may not be hiring on a permanent basis at the time. When that employer does have an opening for a permanent position, the contractors who have already proven their skills and know their operations are often thought of first to fill the role. In fact, over 1,200 of Adecco’s temporary Associates were hired on a permanent basis by our clients last year alone. Temporary employment lets job-seekers prove their skills and gives employers an opportunity to evaluate the best candidates before hiring the most suitable for longer term assignments.
  • Offers employees skills training, experience, mentorship, and benefits. When the temporary labour that businesses need is supplied by a staffing firm, the benefits to both clients and temporary staff are magnified. Temporary staff receive expert guidance from professional Recruitment Consultants on their resumes, cover letters, interview tips, personal branding and presentation skills. They act as the human link between clients and candidates in a sea of online applications. Once candidates are on or between assignments, they get access to not only on-the-job training but also online training seminars and software tutorials they can complete on their own time and upgrade any skills they want—all at no cost to them! Adecco offers 400 of such training modules online to our Associates, ranging from technical software courses and customer service skills, to Health & Safety legislation and procedures. Our Associates can continue to work while they complete courses that strengthen their skill sets and resumes. In addition to the complimentary benefits mentioned above, our Associates can also participate in our robust Group Benefits Plan (once they’ve completed the required number of hours), which entitles them to extended health, dental, drug and insurance benefits. The benefits of working with a staffing firm extend beyond the job experience and skills development temporary workers receive.  Hiring managers can focus on business while the firm takes care of employer responsibilities, oversight, payroll and guidance of their temporary workforce.
  • Presents employment opportunities to vulnerable populations. Contract and temporary employment gives new Canadians an opportunity to land respectable work opportunities, gain work experience and start providing for their families quickly. It gives motivated parents re-entering the workplace after parental leave or life changes an opportunity to start earning a salary once again and edge into longer-term positions. It lets seniors find part-time work, graduates land their first jobs and students get supplementary work while they’re in school. Temporary employment positively impacts every generation, demographic, and facet of Canadian life.
  • Gives Millennials what they’re looking for. Millennials make up over 37% of the Canadian labour force, and they’re increasingly more open to jumping between projects, companies, and industries for experience and variety. They’re also much more likely to pursue “side-hustles” and passion projects—such as graphic design, baking, yoga instruction or writing. Temporary positions fit in nicely with their varied schedules, changing priorities, love of travel and a strong desire for work that fits in with their lives. And when young job seekers or recent grads are challenged in finding a permanent job in a timely manner, working on a temporary or contract basis fills in the gap of not working at all.

With all the benefits that temporary labour provides to business and the economy, employees and their families, it’s no wonder that it’s the preferred career path for millions of Canadians. A large contingency of temporary or part-time workers in Canada voluntarily choose part-time work due to all the reasons discussed above, including a preference for added flexibility or seasonal work, better scheduling around classes for students, and greater work-life balance. In fact, a CareerBuilder/Inavero survey (presented at the 2016 ACSESS Conference) found that 76% of temporary employees work temporarily by choice! Canada’s businesses and industries need temporary labour, and Canada’s workforce loves its advantages. We hope that’s a permanent match.