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Posts from the ‘Career Advice’ Category

Persistence and You

By Andrea Mancini, Adecco Canada National Account Executive


Success is all about persistence and doing the right thing for the long term.
-Bruce Rauner

 

In a world where it often feels like all your problems could be solved with one app click, I have found that the formula for success requires more effort and good old-fashioned persistence. Any successful sales champion will tell you that they did not reach the top of their game by hoping for success to knock at their door. Instead, they’ll probably tell you that sales success requires patience, confidence and grit–all qualities that are part of being persistent.

You either have what it takes to make it in sales or you don’t. Why? Because sales requires you to face yourself and your brand every single day—a difficult task when your brand is intangible. Sales also draws on your own innate characteristics. However, while you cannot “teach” sales, you can develop your innate skills and combine it with a positive, persistent attitude, to become a sales champion that is resistant to any economic conditions.

Here’s how:

Don’t take it personally
You will hear “no” many times in your pursuit to be a sales champion. The key is to hear it, acknowledge it politely, and remember, it’s not personal. The receiver is not saying “no” to you, they’re just saying “no, not now.” And there could be many reasons why they’ve responded this way. Your job is to persist and find out; why not now. It could be because you haven’t given them a reason to say yes.

Knowledge is power
Understanding a prospective client is fundamental to being able to present them with something they’ll want to say “yes” to. Be persistent and thorough when approaching a sales lead or prospect. Your job is to explore and understand who they are even before you get your foot in the door. What are their objectives, what is new in their world, why would they want to talk to you and allow you in their space?

So what?
With the rise of customer sophistication combined with all of your competitors knocking on your client’s door, you need to give them a reason to let you in. You need to persuasively present a compelling value proposition that demonstrates that you understand how you can add value and make it easier for the buyer. Otherwise, you’ll be faced with a literal or figurative “so what?” Until you can answer that question, be persistent.
A useful exercise is to refer back to how you buy. Take the example of buying new shoes. If you go into the shoe store knowing that you need running shoes, but the salesperson keeps showing you a hiking boot, they can describe its benefits all they want—that it’s on sale, made of good quality leather, how fashionable it is—but all you want is someone to point you to the best running shoes, at the best price, so you can run that 5k. Know what your buyer is buying and you’ll be able to anticipate and meet their expectations.

Be Authentic
We all know that buyers buy from people they trust. And the way you build trust is to be persistent in communicating your interest in helping your buyer, have the knowledge to back it up, and be yourself. Posturing, “sucking up”, or “buying” your client may work in the short-term, but you may suffer negative consequences in the long-term. Trust your abilities and your main objective to help your client and everything will eventually fall into place..

Grit with a cherry on top
Don’t underestimate the delicate balance of being persistent while remaining kind and professional. In my early years of selling, when I asked my prospects why they agreed to meet with me, they would affectionately comment that it was because “ you wouldn’t stop calling.” I took that as a semi-compliment, interpreting it as: “ you were persistent but not pushy, and I don’t know why but I like you, so now what are you going to do for me?” The art of not being pushy but still commanding attention comes from practice and the confidence that you have done your homework, you know why you want to sell something to a prospect, and, you love the chase!

Persistence is achieved by having an unwavering faith that your efforts are going to translate into a win one day. This requires patience, confidence, and a support system you trust. The process will require practice and possibly even reinvention, but if you stay positive and remain persistent, your goals will be within reach. Happy winning!

 

As a National Account Executive for Adecco Canada, Andrea Mancini’s primary focus is sales and contract negotiation for medium and large sized organizations. Her diverse background in the staffing industry has positioned her to create holistic solutions for her clients. Her many roles include Recruitment Management, Business Development, Field Manager, and National Sales. For over 10 years, Andrea has created long lasting client relationships by helping companies in the changing world of work. Many of her solutions have included implementing successful Master Vendor programs, creative Permanent Placement initiatives, and Large Volume solutions for employers of choice.  As a result, Andrea is a three-time recipient of prestigious sales awards in the staffing industry.

Andrea holds an Honours B.A. in Media Communications from Brock University.

Automation Gives as it Takes

By: Federico Vione, CEO of Adecco General Staffing and Pontoon, North America, UK and Ireland

Improvements in technology are the catalyst for amazing innovation, but the level of fear over how recent improvements will affect the workplace has never been higher.

Fear is in the employee, who reads that half of all North American jobs are at risk of being replaced through automation and worries their job may soon be obsolete.

Fear is in the employer, who takes risks and incurs costs by embracing and implementing new technology.

And yes, fear is in the staffing industry, as agencies witness clients replace jobs with automation and robotics.

But where there is fear—where there is a challenge—there is opportunity.

We are in a period of transition, not extinction. Yes, automation is gradually reshaping the workforce, and today’s jobs will not be identical to tomorrow’s, but there will be jobs. And while it is the responsibility of employees and employers to prepare for that next chapter, we are here to help. Adecco is partnering with organizations across the globe on job training programs designed to prepare workers for this opportunity.

The University of Phoenix recently presented an ad that is a great example of promoting this opportunity, highlighting a modern “Rosie the Riveter” living through the pain of losing her job to automation. How does Rosie overcome this? Through education of course. Particularly by developing a new skill set and applying it to an industry which had not yet been affected by automation.

It is an uplifting story, but where do we go from here—where do you go? As an employee, identify if the work you do is likely to be impacted by automation. If so, be proactive and prepare yourself for the future. Just like Rosie, develop an array of skills that will make you an asset regardless of technology’s impact. As an employer, recognize the power you have to invest in your employees for the future of your company. Offer opportunities to build their resilience and grow skills that will be a necessity in your evolving workplace.

My colleague and Adecco Chief Marketing and Communications Officer Stephan Howeg recently published an article for the World Economic Forum titled “Why robots should inspire hope, not fear.” We share the same optimistic sentiment for the future and it trickles down throughout our organization.

We are just as confident in our ability to help prepare the workforce to work alongside new technology as we are proud to partner with governments, businesses and job seekers to fulfill that mission.

 

Federico is the Regional Head North America, UK & Ireland, Adecco and Pontoon.

Federico Vione joined Adecco in 1999 as Branch Manager and was subsequently appointed Manager of the Abruzzo-Molise area. In 2001, he became the National Key Account Manager for the Chemical and Pharma sector, and subsequently for the Large-Scale Trade sector. In 2002, he was appointed General Manager of the Professional Staffing business Ajilon S.r.l., and in 2004 he became General Manager of Ajilon Switzerland. In 2005, Federico Vione was appointed Project Leader Global Account Management Adecco Group and subsequently Head of Eastern Europe. In January 2009, he was appointed Country Manager Adecco Italy. Federico Vione was Vice President of Assolavoro (Assoziazione Nazionale delle Agenzie per il Lavoro), Italy, between 2010 and 2012.

A Day in the Life of a National Sales Executive

By Wendy Smith, National Sales Executive, Adecco Canada

Sales has been a natural part of my career in the staffing industry for the past 18 years.
I can honestly say that I genuinely love this industry and sales. Passion breeds enthusiasm, and in this industry, passion translates into a sincere desire to help clients find the right talent.

Sales — when done right — is actually service. It is the foundation of many businesses. In my role as a National Sales Executive for The Adecco Group, my job is to figure out the needs of our customer, and, map a solution that is right for them and their business.

A day in the life of a National Sales Executive starts with organization — planning being at the top of my list. I create a weekly and monthly schedule, with short and long-term goals. Following this type of strict schedule helps to develop the most accomplished salesperson.

And then comes the secret sauce. Prospecting, prospecting and more prospecting. This is key to becoming a prosperous salesperson. Constantly prospecting means my pipeline is always full and I’m talking to people every single day — no matter what.

When you get to connect with a prospect, they become your audience. And to win, you must understand your audience. If you are not armed with a good understanding of their experience, perspective and needs before you meet, you will be at a disadvantage. During the crucial pre-meeting discovery calls with key decision makers you need to gather as much information possible. My meetings with potential clients are guided by discussing their staffing issues, internal practices, future goals and objectives and most importantly, their service expectations. The reason why I make sure to get all this information (and maybe a little more) is because my ultimate goal is to become an extension of their HR team and to truly see how our solutions and services can benefit their business.

Another type of selling I do is through proposals. I work with our Proposal Team on large scale Request for Proposals (RFP). Working on these RFP’s puts me in a position to collaborate with The Adecco Group professionals across the country and world. The solutions we tend to recommend for these clients are our Master Vendor Program (MVP), MVP+, On-site Managed Services and our Recruitment Consulting solutions.

Selling is much easier if you’re selling a great product and service, one that is backed by excellent customer service — something I’m proud to be part of at The Adecco Group.
We have the greatest resources to provide our clients with the services they need, and recommend the right workforce strategy at a global, national and local level.

At The Adecco Group we inspire individuals and organizations to work more effectively and efficiently. Our business has a positive impact on millions of people every day, and I’m truly honoured to have the opportunity to meet with existing clients and potential new clients every day to shed light on the benefits of partnering with our organization for their staffing needs.

The core of my role as a National Sales Executive is understanding our clients’ needs, developing a tailored solution and executing our programs with a high level of service and value.
This is what truly sets The Adecco Group apart from our competitors.

I have found that the best sales people don’t focus on selling. They focus on helping their customers visualize a better solution. I make it a habit of building trust and credibility with prospects and remain committed to each and every client I meet. The Adecco Group’s foundation is built on valuing each organization’s needs and goals.

 

Wendy Smith has more than 18 years’ experience in the staffing industry. Wendy has worn many hats in our industry which has proven to be beneficial to our clients. She started her career as a recruiter, assisting clients with their temporary and permanent staffing needs, and, has managed the largest temporary and permanent staffing branches in Ontario.

Equipped with a strong understanding of recruitment processes and operations, Wendy arms our clients with knowledge on the current marketplace and, insight on what the best solution is for their objectives.

Wendy is part of The Adecco Group’s National Sales Team. Her role is to meet with our national clients to ensure Adecco offers and executes the right solution for their workforce needs, while managing all contract negotiations.

With her passion for our industry driving her, Wendy’s main goal is to ensure our clients have the right solutions from day one.

10 Things To Know When You Are Being Let Go!

by Kate Toner, Government Proposal Writer, The Adecco Group, Canada

The words are still hanging in the air because your brain is scrambling to comprehend them.

Completely unsuspected, the unthinkable is happening.  The thing that happens to other people, not to you.  The hushed tale told by a friend about a mutual acquaintance to which you shake your head and commiserate with a, “how terrible for them”.

Your ear listens to a myriad of other words being uttered and grasps the phrase, “it has nothing to do with your work.”

Your brain, now beating back the enzymes triggered by stress, pauses, looks towards your ear and nods in agreement.

“We will, of course, provide you an exceptional reference.”

Your brain on high alert now—functioning at optimal levels to control not only your hearing but potential inappropriate responses to stress—FREEZES.

YOU ARE BEING LET GO!

Now as a matter of course, it will seem as though your brain has stopped functioning entirely.  This, however, is very untrue.  Your brain is in the fight of its life assigning the correct emotional responses to these events, to ensure acceptable and appropriate behaviours are attributed to each particular and subsequent unfolding moment.

Still attempting to reign in your emotions, your brain will start firing inappropriate questions off the walls of your cranium.  “What about Joe Smith? Is Joe Smith being let go too? Is my entire department being let go?  Is it just me?  Is this really happening?!?!?!?”

However, these are not the questions your brain should be asking.  The questions your brain should be asking, it will only present to you in hindsight.  This will be true for the vast majority unless perhaps:  a) you have been through this situation before; b) someone close to you (like a spouse or friend) has told you in great detail about their own experience; or c) you happen to remember a blog you read on this very topic!

Your employer is letting you go.  What are the ten things you should ask or do?

  1. Ask for time to review anything before signing.

Being let go from your place of employment is a stressful experience with an immediate and natural emotional response.  If you are being asked to sign a document that has a lot of detail, or you want to ensure you understand it fully before agreeing to any terms, you should ask to take the document with you to read in a later state of calm—or perhaps after you have consulted a lawyer, the Employment Standards Act (ESA) in your province; or Federal Employment Standards (whichever applies to your employer’s jurisdiction). Many companies will provide you the time to do so, but with a specified date of when a response is expected from you.

If you feel confident in signing at that particular moment, for example if the document is only confirming that you have been advised of the company’s decision to let you go, but not necessarily agreeing to any terms, be sure to get a copy of the document you signed.

  1. Find out your end date.

Is the expectation that you are being walked off the premises directly after you have been told your employment is ending?  Depending on the company’s policy, you may request to pick up personal belongings from your desk, or make arrangements to come back after hours.  Be prepared to have a company representative with you as you pack up your things. Alternatively you could request that your employer go and get the items you need for that day, and agree to send your remaining personal items to your home address.

In some situations you may be asked to work through a notice period.  Some questions to ask should be around expectations during this time. Are you going to be providing a transfer of knowledge?  If you are client facing, are you expected to keep or cancel any meetings you had previously scheduled?

Additionally, it is important to know your exact end date in regards to your final pay.  Some companies may consider you still as an employee while receiving any payments which may impact the beginning of your Employment Insurance (EI) benefits (if you are entitled to them).

  1. Ask if you will be considered for future employment with the company?

The role you are being let go from may simply cease to exist, your duties may be absorbed into another department.  It is beneficial to clarify, especially if there is the possibility of another role in a different department or another location with the same company.  Some companies have a policy not to rehire staff that has been let go, regardless of the circumstances.

  1. Are you getting any payments? How much and for how long?

This is an important financial planning question, because any payments made to you can also impact your Employment Insurance (EI) Benefits at the same time.  Any payments you do receive will be taken into account by Service Canada.  So while you may register for Employment Insurance, it may be a while before the Government deems it necessary to provide EI to you based any ongoing payments you are receiving from the employer.

Your payment information should be outlined in the letter/documentation you received. You may want to consult a lawyer, your province’s Employment Standards Act (ESA), or the Federal Employment Standards to ensure you are receiving the correct termination payments in accordance with legislation.

  1. What date will you be paid?

Your date of final payment should be in accordance with provincial legislation.  Clarify with your employer when this will be, or check your local employment standards/labour code.

  1. What happens to commissions/bonus?

In some roles, your job may be a base salary plus a commission (sometimes referred to as a bonus) structure.  Find out what happens to your commissions; when your commissions will be paid out; or if they will be prorated.

  1. When will your health insurance benefits end?

Generally the majority of current benefit entitlements are required by employment standards to continue during your notice period.  You may want to speak to your HR department or the person responsible regarding insurance to clarify the policy’s terms and conditions.

  1. Will there be outplacement services?

While in Canada there is no legislation requiring an employer to provide outplacement services, some companies do offer outplacement services (potentially through a third party) as a means to ease your transition.  Outplacement services may include career counselling, re-orientation into the job market, advice on resume writing and/or interviewing techniques, etc.  This is beneficial if you have been a long-term employee and are entering the job market for the first time in a number of years.

  1. When will you receive your Record of Employment (ROE)? Follow-up!

The Record of Employment (ROE) is mandatory in establishing a claim for Employment Insurance (EI) benefits.  Service Canada uses the information provided on the ROE to determine whether you are eligible to receive EI benefits, the amount of the benefits you are entitled to, and the length of time the benefits will be provided to you.  You are able to register for EI without your ROE, however your EI eligibility will not be determined until Service Canada’s receipt of the ROE.  Your employer may choose to send the ROE directly to Service Canada electronically after your notice period ends rather than during.  Now if you are in a case where there is a notice period, but you are not required to work all of it, you may want to follow-up with your employer when the ROE will be sent in.

Alternately if you can get a copy of the ROE from your employer, do so—the copy will be used by Service Canada until the electronic copy from your employer is received.  You can register the required information so Service Canada can make the above determinations regarding your file and EI eligibility without delay.

  1. File for Employment Insurance (EI) Benefits immediately.

Even if you believe you are highly employable and will not require EI, the process of looking for new employment can take longer than you might expect.  You will still have living costs to deal with while waiting for a potential employer to make you an offer, or provide you a start date if an employment offer has been made.  If you are eligible for EI benefits, file right away.  Remember that filing for EI can be done without receipt of your Record of Employment, but your assessment will not be completed by Service Canada until the ROE is received.

Registering for Employment Insurance Benefits can be done online at Service Canada’s site:  https://www.canada.ca; or in person at the Service Canada location nearest you.

Remember…

Being “let go” is a temporary state (especially if you proactively look for another place of employment).

Talk to people you trust, or to your friends and/or family.  You will be amazed by the stories you hear and the number of people you know who have been in the exact same situation—all of whom have survived and thrived, you will too.

Potentially, this can be viewed as a new opportunity for you.  Perhaps you will decide to go back to school, or travel, or become an entrepreneur.  Being let go from your job may become the catalyst for a new and exciting time in your life.

Don’t view being let go as an ending because the most important truth about the situation is so much better than that …it is a beginning!

 

Kate Toner is a Government Proposal Writer in Adecco’s Head Office.  She possesses over 17 years of professional business writing experience in the staffing industry, 16 years of which were dedicated to the information technology staffing field.  Kate’s focus on government contracts during that time has honed her business writing skills and aided in winning multiple standing offers, supply arrangements, vendor of records, and preferred status with numerous public sector clients and broader public sector clients.  Celebrating her first year with Adecco in June 2017, Kate is passionate about the power of the written word and its importance in business communications.

Disclaimer

The above is not legal advice, nor is it intended to replace legal advice.  Various industries must comply with provincial employment standards, however, some industries are required to follow federal employment standards.  An employee, in event of being let go from their employment, should always refer to the official legislated version of Employment Standards Act (ESA) regulations in their Province or at the Federal level.  Check with your provincial Ministry of Labour or the Canadian Government for the updated version of the ESA which can be found online in most regions. Please also note that if you are a unionized worker you will also wish to check with your Union Representative to understand your rights under your collective agreement which may have additional standards for employers to adhere to.  Find out which applies to your employer and contact an employment lawyer in order to know your legal rights. 

Networking is a Game Changer in Helping with your Job Search

Why network? In today’s business world networking has become a big deal. Meeting people who can provide mentorship or at least put you in touch with individuals that can steer you in the right direction is key to success in a job search or even when running your own business. For some, it’s very natural to meet new people and develop relationships but for others it can be challenging even terrifying at times. Networking is like a garden that requires supervision and maintenance to deliver you success. So how do you become a successful networker? There’s really no real science to it. It’s getting yourself out there and just doing it.

Join clubs, groups and meet people who have similar interests. Volunteer or attend a fundraiser that you are enthusiastic about. Having similar interests will make it easier for you to get involved and immerse yourself in the activity, which will allow you to be more available to the people around you. You need to be visible in order to meet people. Connection is the key to building a strong network. So don’t go home right after work, go out for dinner with colleagues, attend local events, conferences and networking events.

Building trust is another key variable to building a good network. You have to cultivate real, deep relationships with your contacts before you can ask them for a favour or expect them to help you find a job. Building confidence with your network takes an investment of time on your part. Remember, people who don’t really know you, won’t refer or promote you.

Having a diverse network is also a key factor in building a strong solid network. You need to look beyond your connections and get to know people who are not like you, who are not in your industry, or social group. This means expanding outside of your comfort zone to meet diverse people. By diversifying your network, you can meet the connectors who can put you in touch with individuals that can point you to the road that leads to success.

Be open to asking genuine and thought-provoking questions. Also, prepare yourself to do more of the listening by allowing the other person to do most of the talking. This will help you understand them better and give them a positive feeling about your exchange. This will not only help you gain more information about the person but it will also give you details about them that you can use for follow-up conversations at a later date. Be open to joining a conversation during a break and introducing yourself. Most people are okay with being interrupted and it gives them a chance to meet someone new. If the conversation seems too serious, you can politely excuse yourself and move on.

Consider how you can help others but drawing connections within your own network. You might have the opportunity to be the matchmaker yourself and introduce your contacts in their service or industry to these new networks. Make sure to follow through with both parties to find out what happened with their interaction. It can help you out in the future and also allow you work on your “connector” skills.

Now you are one step closer to becoming an expert networker.

Happy Networking!

By Andrea Theophilos, Social Media Marketing, Adecco Canada

Andrea Theophilos manages Adecco Canada’s social media platforms. She possesses over 18 years of marketing and event management experience and has worked in various industries that include travel, government, healthcare, finance and staffing. 

Canada Ranks 13th in the 2017 Global Talent Competitiveness Index

gtci-2017-full-reportThe Adecco Group has once again partnered with INSEAD and the Human Capital Leadership Institute to produce the Global Talent Competitiveness Index (GTCI) — an annual benchmarking report that ranks 118 countries according to their ability to grow, attract and retain talent.

Launched for the first time in 2013, The GTCI provides a tool-kit for governments, businesses, organizations and personnel throughout the world to prepare them for the future of work. Its wealth of data and analysis is intended to help countries overcome talent mismatches and be competitive in the global marketplace.

Why is talent so important?

Talent has become the ‘currency’ of the global labour market and therefore something that decision makers in business, policy and academia need to understand in depth.

Talent is increasingly becoming the subject of intense debate, and these arguments are not simply about skills shortages. Talent competitiveness lies at the heart of important societal issues, such as unemployment, immigration, education and economic growth — whether in the context of restoring post-crisis prosperity, creating jobs for the young, maintaining momentum in high-growth economies or lifting entire nations out of poverty.

The global workforce must recognize the skills they will need for the future, governments must understand how they can secure the right to work for their citizen and countries need to ensure they remain competitive in the global economy.

What global talent trends have emerged?

The 2017 study focuses on how technology is affecting talent competitiveness and the nature of work, exploring both significant challenges and opportunities, and important shifts away from traditional working approaches.

trends

 

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