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Posts from the ‘Youth Employment’ Category

My First Week as Adecco Canada’s First CEO1Month

By Alana Couvrette

If you have 30 seconds….

During my first week as Adecco Canada’s CEO for One Month, I:
1. Visited Adecco’s Laval and Montreal branch
2. Networked with clients during the Lead breakfast
3. Asked the President of Adecco Canada probably over 100 questions
4. Filmed a 24 hour in my life video
5. Saw Cirque du Soleil’s Volta
6. And, spent half of my Sunday in an elevator (I am claustrophobic…details to come)

If you have five minutes…

Students, like myself, are well accustomed to seeing the workplace from the “bottoms up” point of view. Interaction with senior management is, to put it frankly, a rarity. During my past co-op terms, I remember vividly asking myself “Who’s up there” and “What do they do exactly”? Ultimately, it was my curiosity that led me to apply for the CEO for One Month contest.

On my first day, I learned that the new Canadian President had set himself an ambitious task: to visit all of Adecco’s branches in Canada during his first few months. So, naturally, I had to follow suit. I visited both the Laval and Montreal branches and met with the staff, who engage with associates on a day to day basis. These meetings proved to be fruitful, as I left with a greater understanding of what Adecco does at the ground level “the foundation of its business”. This was nicely complemented by the Lēad breakfast, where I got to network with some of our clients and got a feel for the HR Industry.

After our branch visits, I had the opportunity to see Cirque du Soleil’s (one of our largest clients) Volta performance. The things that the human body can do baffles me! I can’t even touch my toes and here I was watching people put their feet behind their heads. After this performance, I realized that I must find a way to squeeze in some exercise in my CEO schedule. I did, however, find the time to strap on a GoPro to my head, in the hopes of filming a “24 hours in my day” video. Stay tuned for the result!

Of course, I also spent a lot of time with Gilbert Boileau, Adecco Canada President. From the moment, I stepped into his office, I found myself already working on a project. My intuition told me, right then and there, that a great month was to come. I sat in on phone calls, attended meetings and traveled with Gilbert. However, what I enjoyed the most was the time we had in between meetings and phone calls. Coming from a public administration and political science background, some business terms were unfamiliar and Gilbert kindly took the time to explain them to me. We also took part in engaging discussions (is it fair to say debates) on the talent industry, the job market and even politics.

As you may or may not know, although I have been selected as the 2017 Adecco Canada CEO for One Month, I am also in the running towards becoming the Adecco Groups’ Global Leadership CEO for One Month. The Adecco Group revealed we would participate in challenges for this role. The first challenge to all 48 CEOs for One Month was announced mid-way through my first week, an “elevator pitch” in an elevator. Did I mention that I am both claustrophobic and have a fear of elevators?

Week one went by in a flash but I did make sure to capture some moments through photos.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you have more than five minutes…

Follow me on Twitter @alana_couvrette, Instagram @alana.couvrette, Facebook- https://www.facebook.com/alana.couvrette or follow my hashtag #AlanaC1M for daily content.

Vote for who you think deserves a spot at the Global Leadership Bootcamp bit.ly/2rhvQ0n. But, before you do, be sure to check out my elevator pitch on Youtube. I’ll let you do the judging…

Week Two: bring it on!

Employment Report – March 2017

Employment Rates

Employment was little changed in March (+19,000 or +0.1%), while the unemployment rate rose 0.1 percentage points to 6.7% as more people searched for work.

In the first quarter of 2017, employment gains totalled 83,000 or 0.5%. This growth is comparable to the last quarter of 2016 (+91,000 or +0.5%) and notably higher than the first quarter of 2016 (+36,000 or +0.2%).

Compared with 12 months earlier, employment increased by 276,000 (+1.5%), mostly in full-time work. Over the same period, the total number of hours worked rose 0.7%.

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Webinar: How to answer the 15 most common interview questions

  This year marks a significant shift in the workforce. Millennials now represent the largest percentage of the workforce for the very first time, with 28% already sitting in management positions and 2/3 seeing themselves in management roles within the next ten years. As more millennials assume management positions, you may be noticing changes in […]

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Employment Report – November 2016

Employment Rates

After two consecutive months of notable increases, employment was little changed in November (+11,000 or +0.1%). With fewer people searching for work, the unemployment rate fell by 0.2 percentage points to 6.8%.

Compared with November 2015, overall employment rose by 183,000 (+1.0%), with the number of people working part time increasing by 214,000 (+6.4%). Over the same period, the total number of hours worked was up 1.1%.

Highlights

In November, employment increased for men in the 25 to 54 age group and for men 55 and older, while it declined for women 55 and older. There was little change among the other demographic groups.

Provincially, employment rose in Nova Scotia while it fell in Alberta.

More people were employed in the finance, insurance, real estate and leasing industry, in information, culture and recreation, in the “other services” industry and in agriculture. On the other hand, declines were observed in construction, in manufacturing, as well as in transportation and warehousing.

There were fewer self-employed workers in November, while the number of employees was little changed in both the public and private sectors.

Demographic overview

Employment rose by 22,000 among men aged 25 to 54 in November, and their unemployment rate was 6.3%. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment for men in this age group was little changed.

For men 55 and older, employment increased by 13,000, lowering their unemployment rate by 0.7 percentage points to 6.6%. On a year-over-year basis, employment for this group was up 47,000 (+2.3%) and their unemployment rate was unchanged.

Among women 55 and older, employment fell by 19,000 in November and the unemployment rate was 4.7%. In the 12 months to November, employment for women in this age group was up 80,000 or 4.8%—the largest employment growth of all demographic groups.

While little changed in the month, employment for women 25 to 54 was up 54,000 (+1.0%) on a year-over-year basis. At the same time, their unemployment rate declined by 0.6 percentage points to 5.2%.

Youth aged 15 to 24 saw little change in employment both on a monthly and year-over-year basis, while their population growth continued on a downward trend. The youth unemployment rate stood at 12.9% in November.

Provincial summary

In Nova Scotia, 3,700 more people were employed in November and the unemployment rate was 8.0%. On a year-over-year basis, employment in the province was virtually unchanged.

In Alberta, employment fell by 13,000 in November. At the same time, the number of job-seekers increased (+11,000), pushing the unemployment rate up 0.5 percentage points to 9.0%—the highest rate since July 1994. Compared with November 2015, employment in the province was down 30,000 (-1.3%) and unemployment increased by 52,000 (+30.6%).

Employment in Ontario edged up in November (+19,000 or +0.3%), following a notable increase the previous month. The unemployment rate was little changed at 6.3% in November. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment in the province grew by 105,000 (+1.5%).

British Columbia saw little change in the number of employed in November. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment gains totalled 48,000 or 2.1%—the fastest growth rate among the provinces. Though little changed in the month, British Columbia’s unemployment rate remained the lowest provincially at 6.1%.

Employment in Quebec was also little changed in November. With fewer job-seekers, Quebec’s unemployment rate fell 0.6 percentage points to 6.2%—a record low since comparable data became available in 1976—continuing a downward trend since the beginning of 2016. On a year-over-year basis, employment in the province increased by 81,000 (+2.0%) and unemployment declined by 56,000 (-17.0%).

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Webinar: Millennials in Leadership Roles

 

millennials-webinar_dec7

This year marks a significant shift in the workforce. Millennials now represent the largest percentage of the workforce for the very first time, with 28% already sitting in management positions and 2/3 seeing themselves in management roles within the next ten years. As more millennials assume management positions, you may be noticing changes in the nature of the workplace. Why? Because there are distinct differences between the work styles, expectations, and career perspectives of this generation compared to their predecessors.

Read more

Employment Report – October 2016

Employment Rates

Employment rose by 44,000 (+0.2%) in October as a result of more part-time work. The unemployment rate remained at 7.0% as more people participated in the labour market.

Compared with 12 months earlier, employment increased by 140,000 (+0.8%), mostly in part-time work (+124,000 or +3.6%). At the same time, the total number of hours worked was little changed.

Highlights

In October, employment increased among youth and edged up for men aged 25 to 54. There was little change among the other demographic groups in the month.

Provincially, employment was up in Ontario and British Columbia, while it declined in Newfoundland and Labrador.

More people were employed in construction, wholesale and retail trade, “other services,” educational services, natural resources and public administration. At the same time, there were declines in business, building, and other support services.

The number of private sector employees edged up in October, while there was little change in the number of public sector employees and self-employed.

Demographic overview

Among youth aged 15 to 24, employment increased by 26,000 in October, with all of the gains in part-time work. The unemployment rate for this group was virtually unchanged at 13.0%, as more youth participated in the labour market. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment among youth was little changed while their population declined by 1.1% (-48,000), continuing a downward trend.

In October, employment for men aged 25 to 54 increased slightly (+16,000), and their unemployment rate was little changed at 6.4%. On a year-over-year basis, full-time employment fell (-63,000 or -1.1%), while part-time work increased (+36,000 or +10.4%). Over the same period, their population grew 0.2% (+18,000).

For women aged 25 to 54, employment was virtually unchanged in the month. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment for these women rose by 61,000 (+1.1%), mostly in full-time work. At the same time, their unemployment rate fell by 0.4 percentage points to 5.3%. The population for this group rose 0.3% (+24,000) on a year-over-year basis.

Among people 55 and older, employment was little changed in October. On a year-over-year basis, this group was the fastest growing segment of the labour force, mostly the result of population aging. Employment rose by 128,000 (+3.5%) among people 55 and older, and their population increased by 310,000 (+3.0%).

Of all demographic groups, women 55 and older had the largest increase in employment (+93,000 or +5.6%) compared with 12 months earlier, mostly in full-time work. Their labour force participation rate continued on an upward trend and their unemployment rate held steady at 5.0%.

For men 55 and older, employment increased by 35,000 (+1.7%) on a year-over-year basis, entirely in part time. At the same time, their unemployment rate increased 1.6 percentage points to 7.3% as more of them searched for work.

Provincial summary

Employment in Ontario increased by 25,000 in October, and the unemployment rate declined 0.2 percentage points to 6.4%. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment in the province grew by 77,000 (+1.1%).

In British Columbia, employment rose by 15,000 in October. At the same time, the unemployment rate increased by 0.5 percentage points to 6.2% as more people searched for work. Despite this increase, the unemployment rate remained the lowest among the provinces. On a year-over-year basis, British Columbia also had the fastest employment growth rate among the provinces at 2.4% (+56,000).

Employment declined by 5,600 in Newfoundland and Labrador, and the unemployment rate increased 1.3 percentage points to 14.9%. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment in the province was down by 6,100 (-2.6%), and the unemployment rate increased by 1.7 percentage points.

In Quebec, employment was virtually unchanged in October, following two consecutive months of gains. On a year-over-year basis, employment in the province rose by 70,000 (+1.7%), entirely in full-time work. Over the same period, the unemployment rate declined 0.8 percentage points to 6.8%.

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