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Posts from the ‘Self-employment’ Category

Employment Report – December 2016

Employment Rates After two consecutive months of notable increases, employment was little changed in November (+11,000 or +0.1%). With fewer people searching for work, the unemployment rate fell by 0.2 percentage points to 6.8%. Compared with November 2015, overall employment rose by 183,000 (+1.0%), with the number of people working part time increasing by 214,000 (+6.4%). Over the same period, the total number of […]

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Employment Report – November 2016

Employment Rates

After two consecutive months of notable increases, employment was little changed in November (+11,000 or +0.1%). With fewer people searching for work, the unemployment rate fell by 0.2 percentage points to 6.8%.

Compared with November 2015, overall employment rose by 183,000 (+1.0%), with the number of people working part time increasing by 214,000 (+6.4%). Over the same period, the total number of hours worked was up 1.1%.

Highlights

In November, employment increased for men in the 25 to 54 age group and for men 55 and older, while it declined for women 55 and older. There was little change among the other demographic groups.

Provincially, employment rose in Nova Scotia while it fell in Alberta.

More people were employed in the finance, insurance, real estate and leasing industry, in information, culture and recreation, in the “other services” industry and in agriculture. On the other hand, declines were observed in construction, in manufacturing, as well as in transportation and warehousing.

There were fewer self-employed workers in November, while the number of employees was little changed in both the public and private sectors.

Demographic overview

Employment rose by 22,000 among men aged 25 to 54 in November, and their unemployment rate was 6.3%. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment for men in this age group was little changed.

For men 55 and older, employment increased by 13,000, lowering their unemployment rate by 0.7 percentage points to 6.6%. On a year-over-year basis, employment for this group was up 47,000 (+2.3%) and their unemployment rate was unchanged.

Among women 55 and older, employment fell by 19,000 in November and the unemployment rate was 4.7%. In the 12 months to November, employment for women in this age group was up 80,000 or 4.8%—the largest employment growth of all demographic groups.

While little changed in the month, employment for women 25 to 54 was up 54,000 (+1.0%) on a year-over-year basis. At the same time, their unemployment rate declined by 0.6 percentage points to 5.2%.

Youth aged 15 to 24 saw little change in employment both on a monthly and year-over-year basis, while their population growth continued on a downward trend. The youth unemployment rate stood at 12.9% in November.

Provincial summary

In Nova Scotia, 3,700 more people were employed in November and the unemployment rate was 8.0%. On a year-over-year basis, employment in the province was virtually unchanged.

In Alberta, employment fell by 13,000 in November. At the same time, the number of job-seekers increased (+11,000), pushing the unemployment rate up 0.5 percentage points to 9.0%—the highest rate since July 1994. Compared with November 2015, employment in the province was down 30,000 (-1.3%) and unemployment increased by 52,000 (+30.6%).

Employment in Ontario edged up in November (+19,000 or +0.3%), following a notable increase the previous month. The unemployment rate was little changed at 6.3% in November. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment in the province grew by 105,000 (+1.5%).

British Columbia saw little change in the number of employed in November. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment gains totalled 48,000 or 2.1%—the fastest growth rate among the provinces. Though little changed in the month, British Columbia’s unemployment rate remained the lowest provincially at 6.1%.

Employment in Quebec was also little changed in November. With fewer job-seekers, Quebec’s unemployment rate fell 0.6 percentage points to 6.2%—a record low since comparable data became available in 1976—continuing a downward trend since the beginning of 2016. On a year-over-year basis, employment in the province increased by 81,000 (+2.0%) and unemployment declined by 56,000 (-17.0%).

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Employment Report – October 2016

Employment Rates

Employment rose by 44,000 (+0.2%) in October as a result of more part-time work. The unemployment rate remained at 7.0% as more people participated in the labour market.

Compared with 12 months earlier, employment increased by 140,000 (+0.8%), mostly in part-time work (+124,000 or +3.6%). At the same time, the total number of hours worked was little changed.

Highlights

In October, employment increased among youth and edged up for men aged 25 to 54. There was little change among the other demographic groups in the month.

Provincially, employment was up in Ontario and British Columbia, while it declined in Newfoundland and Labrador.

More people were employed in construction, wholesale and retail trade, “other services,” educational services, natural resources and public administration. At the same time, there were declines in business, building, and other support services.

The number of private sector employees edged up in October, while there was little change in the number of public sector employees and self-employed.

Demographic overview

Among youth aged 15 to 24, employment increased by 26,000 in October, with all of the gains in part-time work. The unemployment rate for this group was virtually unchanged at 13.0%, as more youth participated in the labour market. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment among youth was little changed while their population declined by 1.1% (-48,000), continuing a downward trend.

In October, employment for men aged 25 to 54 increased slightly (+16,000), and their unemployment rate was little changed at 6.4%. On a year-over-year basis, full-time employment fell (-63,000 or -1.1%), while part-time work increased (+36,000 or +10.4%). Over the same period, their population grew 0.2% (+18,000).

For women aged 25 to 54, employment was virtually unchanged in the month. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment for these women rose by 61,000 (+1.1%), mostly in full-time work. At the same time, their unemployment rate fell by 0.4 percentage points to 5.3%. The population for this group rose 0.3% (+24,000) on a year-over-year basis.

Among people 55 and older, employment was little changed in October. On a year-over-year basis, this group was the fastest growing segment of the labour force, mostly the result of population aging. Employment rose by 128,000 (+3.5%) among people 55 and older, and their population increased by 310,000 (+3.0%).

Of all demographic groups, women 55 and older had the largest increase in employment (+93,000 or +5.6%) compared with 12 months earlier, mostly in full-time work. Their labour force participation rate continued on an upward trend and their unemployment rate held steady at 5.0%.

For men 55 and older, employment increased by 35,000 (+1.7%) on a year-over-year basis, entirely in part time. At the same time, their unemployment rate increased 1.6 percentage points to 7.3% as more of them searched for work.

Provincial summary

Employment in Ontario increased by 25,000 in October, and the unemployment rate declined 0.2 percentage points to 6.4%. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment in the province grew by 77,000 (+1.1%).

In British Columbia, employment rose by 15,000 in October. At the same time, the unemployment rate increased by 0.5 percentage points to 6.2% as more people searched for work. Despite this increase, the unemployment rate remained the lowest among the provinces. On a year-over-year basis, British Columbia also had the fastest employment growth rate among the provinces at 2.4% (+56,000).

Employment declined by 5,600 in Newfoundland and Labrador, and the unemployment rate increased 1.3 percentage points to 14.9%. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment in the province was down by 6,100 (-2.6%), and the unemployment rate increased by 1.7 percentage points.

In Quebec, employment was virtually unchanged in October, following two consecutive months of gains. On a year-over-year basis, employment in the province rose by 70,000 (+1.7%), entirely in full-time work. Over the same period, the unemployment rate declined 0.8 percentage points to 6.8%.

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Employment Report – September 2016

Employment rose by 67,000 (+0.4%) in September, with most of the increase in part-time work. The unemployment rate was unchanged at 7.0%, as more people participated in the labour market.

In the third quarter of 2016, employment gains totalled 62,000 (+0.3%). This followed  little change in employment in the second quarter and a slight increase of 33,000 (+0.2%) in the first quarter.

Compared with 12 months earlier, employment rose by 139,000 (+0.8%), with most of the gains in part-time work. Over the same period, the total number of hours worked edged up 0.2%.

In September, there were more employed people aged 55 and older. At the same time, there was little change in employment among both the 15-to-24 and 25-to-54 age groups.

Provincially, employment rose in Quebec, Alberta and New Brunswick. There was little change in the other provinces.

In September, more people worked in public administration, educational services, and transportation and warehousing. At the same time, employment declined in health care and social assistance.

Self-employment increased in September, while there was little change in the number of private and public sector employees.

Demographic overview

Among women aged 55 and older, employment grew by 38,000 in September. However, their unemployment rate was little changed at 5.3%, as their participation in the labour market also increased. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment among women aged 55 and older was up by 122,000 (+7.5%) and their population rose by 156,000 (+2.9%).

There were 19,000 more men aged 55 and older working in September. At the same time, their unemployment rate increased 0.3 percentage points to 6.7%, as more men in this age group searched for work. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment among men aged 55 and older rose by 49,000 (+2.4%) and their population increased by 154,000 (+3.1%).

Employment among both men and women aged 25 to 54 held steady in September. Among this age group, the unemployment rates were essentially unchanged at 6.5% for men and 5.3% for women. On a year-over-year basis, employment for men and women aged 25 to 54 was little changed, while their population rose by 48,000 (+0.3%).

In September, employment among youths aged 15 to 24 was little changed and their unemployment rate remained at 13.2%. The unemployment rate for this group was essentially unchanged compared with 12 months earlier. Over the same period, fewer youths were working (-35,000 or -1.4%) and their population was down by 47,000 (-1.1%).

Provincial summary

In Quebec, employment increased for the second consecutive month, up 38,000 in September. The unemployment rate edged down to 6.9%, the lowest since the start of 2008. Compared with September 2015, employment in the province was up by 61,000 (+1.5%).

Employment in Alberta increased by 13,000 in September. The unemployment rate was little changed at 8.5%, as more people participated in the labour market. Compared with 12 months earlier, there were 47,000 (-2.0%) fewer people employed in the province and the unemployment rate was up 1.9 percentage points.

In New Brunswick, employment rose by 4,400 in September, and the unemployment rate was 9.3%. Employment in the province has been on an upward trend since the spring, following losses from October to March.

Employment in Ontario was little changed in September, and the unemployment rate was 6.6%. However, on a year-over-year basis, employment in the province increased by 82,000 (+1.2%) and the unemployment rate declined 0.3 percentage points.

In British Columbia, employment was essentially unchanged for the second consecutive month. At 5.7% in September, the unemployment rate remained the lowest among the provinces. On a year-over-year basis, employment in British Columbia increased by 62,000 or 2.6%, the fastest growth rate among the provinces.

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