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Posts from the ‘Lēad Articles’ Category

Persistence and You

By Andrea Mancini, Adecco Canada National Account Executive


Success is all about persistence and doing the right thing for the long term.
-Bruce Rauner

 

In a world where it often feels like all your problems could be solved with one app click, I have found that the formula for success requires more effort and good old-fashioned persistence. Any successful sales champion will tell you that they did not reach the top of their game by hoping for success to knock at their door. Instead, they’ll probably tell you that sales success requires patience, confidence and grit–all qualities that are part of being persistent.

You either have what it takes to make it in sales or you don’t. Why? Because sales requires you to face yourself and your brand every single day—a difficult task when your brand is intangible. Sales also draws on your own innate characteristics. However, while you cannot “teach” sales, you can develop your innate skills and combine it with a positive, persistent attitude, to become a sales champion that is resistant to any economic conditions.

Here’s how:

Don’t take it personally
You will hear “no” many times in your pursuit to be a sales champion. The key is to hear it, acknowledge it politely, and remember, it’s not personal. The receiver is not saying “no” to you, they’re just saying “no, not now.” And there could be many reasons why they’ve responded this way. Your job is to persist and find out; why not now. It could be because you haven’t given them a reason to say yes.

Knowledge is power
Understanding a prospective client is fundamental to being able to present them with something they’ll want to say “yes” to. Be persistent and thorough when approaching a sales lead or prospect. Your job is to explore and understand who they are even before you get your foot in the door. What are their objectives, what is new in their world, why would they want to talk to you and allow you in their space?

So what?
With the rise of customer sophistication combined with all of your competitors knocking on your client’s door, you need to give them a reason to let you in. You need to persuasively present a compelling value proposition that demonstrates that you understand how you can add value and make it easier for the buyer. Otherwise, you’ll be faced with a literal or figurative “so what?” Until you can answer that question, be persistent.
A useful exercise is to refer back to how you buy. Take the example of buying new shoes. If you go into the shoe store knowing that you need running shoes, but the salesperson keeps showing you a hiking boot, they can describe its benefits all they want—that it’s on sale, made of good quality leather, how fashionable it is—but all you want is someone to point you to the best running shoes, at the best price, so you can run that 5k. Know what your buyer is buying and you’ll be able to anticipate and meet their expectations.

Be Authentic
We all know that buyers buy from people they trust. And the way you build trust is to be persistent in communicating your interest in helping your buyer, have the knowledge to back it up, and be yourself. Posturing, “sucking up”, or “buying” your client may work in the short-term, but you may suffer negative consequences in the long-term. Trust your abilities and your main objective to help your client and everything will eventually fall into place..

Grit with a cherry on top
Don’t underestimate the delicate balance of being persistent while remaining kind and professional. In my early years of selling, when I asked my prospects why they agreed to meet with me, they would affectionately comment that it was because “ you wouldn’t stop calling.” I took that as a semi-compliment, interpreting it as: “ you were persistent but not pushy, and I don’t know why but I like you, so now what are you going to do for me?” The art of not being pushy but still commanding attention comes from practice and the confidence that you have done your homework, you know why you want to sell something to a prospect, and, you love the chase!

Persistence is achieved by having an unwavering faith that your efforts are going to translate into a win one day. This requires patience, confidence, and a support system you trust. The process will require practice and possibly even reinvention, but if you stay positive and remain persistent, your goals will be within reach. Happy winning!

 

As a National Account Executive for Adecco Canada, Andrea Mancini’s primary focus is sales and contract negotiation for medium and large sized organizations. Her diverse background in the staffing industry has positioned her to create holistic solutions for her clients. Her many roles include Recruitment Management, Business Development, Field Manager, and National Sales. For over 10 years, Andrea has created long lasting client relationships by helping companies in the changing world of work. Many of her solutions have included implementing successful Master Vendor programs, creative Permanent Placement initiatives, and Large Volume solutions for employers of choice.  As a result, Andrea is a three-time recipient of prestigious sales awards in the staffing industry.

Andrea holds an Honours B.A. in Media Communications from Brock University.

Networking is a Game Changer in Helping with your Job Search

Why network? In today’s business world networking has become a big deal. Meeting people who can provide mentorship or at least put you in touch with individuals that can steer you in the right direction is key to success in a job search or even when running your own business. For some, it’s very natural to meet new people and develop relationships but for others it can be challenging even terrifying at times. Networking is like a garden that requires supervision and maintenance to deliver you success. So how do you become a successful networker? There’s really no real science to it. It’s getting yourself out there and just doing it.

Join clubs, groups and meet people who have similar interests. Volunteer or attend a fundraiser that you are enthusiastic about. Having similar interests will make it easier for you to get involved and immerse yourself in the activity, which will allow you to be more available to the people around you. You need to be visible in order to meet people. Connection is the key to building a strong network. So don’t go home right after work, go out for dinner with colleagues, attend local events, conferences and networking events.

Building trust is another key variable to building a good network. You have to cultivate real, deep relationships with your contacts before you can ask them for a favour or expect them to help you find a job. Building confidence with your network takes an investment of time on your part. Remember, people who don’t really know you, won’t refer or promote you.

Having a diverse network is also a key factor in building a strong solid network. You need to look beyond your connections and get to know people who are not like you, who are not in your industry, or social group. This means expanding outside of your comfort zone to meet diverse people. By diversifying your network, you can meet the connectors who can put you in touch with individuals that can point you to the road that leads to success.

Be open to asking genuine and thought-provoking questions. Also, prepare yourself to do more of the listening by allowing the other person to do most of the talking. This will help you understand them better and give them a positive feeling about your exchange. This will not only help you gain more information about the person but it will also give you details about them that you can use for follow-up conversations at a later date. Be open to joining a conversation during a break and introducing yourself. Most people are okay with being interrupted and it gives them a chance to meet someone new. If the conversation seems too serious, you can politely excuse yourself and move on.

Consider how you can help others but drawing connections within your own network. You might have the opportunity to be the matchmaker yourself and introduce your contacts in their service or industry to these new networks. Make sure to follow through with both parties to find out what happened with their interaction. It can help you out in the future and also allow you work on your “connector” skills.

Now you are one step closer to becoming an expert networker.

Happy Networking!

By Andrea Theophilos, Social Media Marketing, Adecco Canada

Andrea Theophilos manages Adecco Canada’s social media platforms. She possesses over 18 years of marketing and event management experience and has worked in various industries that include travel, government, healthcare, finance and staffing. 

Millennials Want More… Corporate Social Responsibility!

By CEO for One Month, Alana Couvrette

Millennials sometimes seem to get a bad rep as a narcissistic, entitled and self-centered generation. But is this fair to say? I don’ t think so…

For example, millennials expect more from their employers than a paycheck. They have a genuine desire to give back to communities, near and far. For them, purposeful work and the ability to create a positive impact take precedence on profit and salary. In fact, in a recent survey, it was revealed that 45% of student about to enter the workforce would even take a pay cut “for a job that makes a social or environmental impact.” They seek to work for organizations who enshrine good values and ethics into their business model.

Organizations, like Adecco, have taken note of this trend. They know that having an organization-wide aspiration to making a positive difference is part of their value-proposition for attracting and retaining the millennial talent pool.
However, trumpeting your values and ethics isn’t enough. You can’t just talk the talk… The young talent pool is eager to roll up their sleeves, get their hands dirty and participate in the efforts to improve communities near and dear to them. Organizations need to be able to offer opportunities for employees to truly engage in the change that they wish to make. Millennials seek diverse volunteerism opportunities.

At Adecco, our core values-passion, entrepreneurship, team spirit, responsibility and customer focus- permeate the whole business. As Adecco Canada’s CEO for One Month, I noticed this right away and can testify to their relevancy in our work. These values are also conveyed through our global employee engagement program, Win4Youth. This program encourages participants to clock up kilometers (through cycling, swimming or running) which are turned into donations to help disadvantaged youngsters find employment.

On June 22nd, 2017, Adecco Canada hosted their annual Solidarity Day, a day dedicated to Win4Youth. We spent the afternoon as a team running around Toronto completing a scavenger hunt filled with wacky photo ops and funny tasks. Maybe it’s just me but I didn’t even notice that we each accumulated around 9 kilometers. Multiply that by the total number of employees in the office and you’ve got a healthy donation! Curious to know how the day went? Watch this short video I made!

Still think millennials are self-centered? Deloitte’s Millennial Survey found that 7,800 young leaders from 29 different countries believe that the business world is getting it wrong. Close to 75% say that they feel businesses are “focused on their own agendas rather than improving society.”

Who’s looking self-centered now?

[1] https://www.forbes.com/sites/jeannemeister/2012/06/07/the-future-of-work-corporate-social-responsiblity-attracts-top-talent/#39aca2c33f95

[1] https://www.fastcompany.com/3046989/what-millennial-employees-really-want

A CEO is Many Things…

By CEO for One Month, Alana Couvrette

Okay I’ll admit it… Before I started my CEO for One Month journey, when I heard the word “CEO” I thought: fancy cars, private jets, exclusive access to exclusive events and, overall, someone who has the world at their fingertips.

But, in reality, a CEO is so much more than what is portrayed in the movies. I wanted to take a moment and reflect on the role of a CEO, based on my experiences as Adecco Canada’s CEO for One Month. A CEO is:

 

… a mediator
Being a CEO isn’t always glamorous. CEOs are often caught in the middle of the toughest situations and must find a way to reconcile opposing views and help parties come to an agreement. CEOs have a knack for creating the right conditions for an agreement.

… the ultimate problem solver
CEOs face the thorniest of problems. By that I mean the unresolved issues that go through multiple levels of governance before landing on their desk. They not only solve problems, but also strategically create them. Challenges help people and companies grow, and a CEO knows exactly when it’s time to push and when it’s time to heed.

… a jack of all trades and a master of them all
CEOs know their business inside out. They’re expert generalists. They navigate vastly different areas of their business with ease and confidence. They have no problem jumping from one subject area to another and they do so at a pace that is dizzying for most!

… a story teller
A CEO’s got a story for everything. Their stories serve to illustrate, engage, inspire and motivate those around them. They’ve got “past lives” that can’t quite stay in the past and they’ve worn many hats throughout their careers. CEOs entice and engage their peers with their stories, telling them how they started their businesses, what they stand for and where they’re headed.

… the boss, but not necessarily the one you’re thinking of
A CEO doesn’t have to be unapproachable or someone who makes you hold your breath when they walk by. Leadership styles can vary and no one style is better than another. Each CEO-man or woman- brings something unique to the table. This is especially important to remember for anyone thinking of taking up a leadership position: You don’t have to “be like the last CEO” to be a successful CEO.

… a mentor and is mentored
CEOs know that mentoring employees is empowering them to succeed which, in turn, makes the organization succeed. However, just because they are at the “top” doesn’t mean that CEOs do not look up to someone or something. They’re all chasing some type of “hero”.

As I pass the half way mark as Adecco Canada’s CEO for One Month, I’ll make it my goal to bear the above characteristics in mind.
The best CEO is one that carves their own path. The best CEO is your own, authentic, self.

 

 

 

THE INSTANT GENERATION CAN PLAN FOR A LASTING FUTURE

This article originally appeared in Lēad Magazine, Issue 20 – Millennials in the Workplace: Leaders of Today.

By Dr. Peter R. Andersen, Anderson Economic Research Inc. 

 

Millennials face a bright future, even though they may not see it.The malaise facing young people today cannot be attributed to age alone. The decade you are born in matters a great deal; the political climate, economy, societal values and global trends of the time significantly influence your opportunities, schooling, family life and career. Children born in the 1890s or the 1920s were unlucky; they faced the devastation of WW1 and WW2. In contrast, the 1930s and 1940s were opportune times to be born; the low birth rates during those years created little competition for university and jobs when those babies came of age during the economic boom years of the 1950s and 1960s.

The current Millennial generation is facing its own set of historical forces. Income security and careers with longevity seem hard to find in this replaceable and global job market.  The Canadian youth labour market shows elevated rates of unemployment compared to prior to the Great Recession and in relation to older Canadians[1]. Older Millennials who were able to start their careers before the 2008-2009 recession may be less affected by these trends, but the entire cohort has been negatively impacted by its aftermath. Millennials are also frustrated that the skills and knowledge they spent years acquiring (in addition to student debt) are not being utilized: among 16-35 year olds, there is a pronounced mismatch between those with medium to high literacy rates who have jobs that engage only medium-low literacy skills[2]. And traditional work no longer offers the benefits and incentives that it once did in earlier decades. The average annual income is the lowest of the last three generations[3], while the cost of housing—particularly in North American tech-hub cities (San Francisco, Silicon Valley, New York, Seattle, Toronto and Vancouver)—is at an all-time high. Job openings in these prohibitively expensive cities repeatedly go unfilled.

Companies are finding it challenging to find young candidates willing to do the work and to retain them long enough to become leaders, while Millennials are out there—desperate for career development and salaries they can use to pay off debts and raise their own budding families on. Millennials living in urban areas—as most do[4]—simply cannot afford to accept entry-level or low paying positions, and they know they are qualified for more.

Fortunately, Millennials have an expertise that will be the key to their long-term career success. They were born into the digital era and at the cusp of a new technology cycle—starting with the information and telecommunications revolution in the early 1980s when IBM introduced its first PC. And much like the Commodore 64, the Macintosh and Dell’s Turbo PC that followed suit, Millennials grew up capitalizing on technological advancements as they approached adulthood by Y2K. The productivity tools (Microsoft), access to information (Google), social networking (Facebook) and mobile computing (smartphones) that came out of the subsequent years fundamentally changed the Millennial relationship with technology like no other peer group in history. Their digital skills give them a clear advantage over the previous analog generations.

The current technology driven economic cycle is still young. Cloud computing was not introduced until 2006 and it took several years for other providers to realize the power of what Amazon Web Services (AWS) had developed. The cloud is now making a huge contribution, enabling and accelerating the start-up of new companies. While the IT application and infrastructure cycle was interrupted by the financial crisis, it is now speeding up. It will be recharged in 2017 by a rebound in the U.S. economy that should last through the rest of this decade.

The well-paying jobs that require technical expertise will be found in this sector, perfectly suited for Millennials’ skillsets and aspirations. The reduced quality of traditional full-time work opportunities is pressuring Millennials to be entrepreneurial and their efforts will fit well with nascent tech companies who require a business culture with an innovative spirit and freedom from conventional thinking and administrative bureaucracy. Millennials are ready to answer the call. They are frustrated by an analog business culture and decision making process that moves slowly; they have grown up used to quick answers and quick results. As long as they can develop their soft skills to be persuasive in the business environment—and are able to influence colleagues and sell their ideas—their efficient digital approach, creativity, passion and communal influence should lead to business success.

Their high student debt will also pay off in time. The 2013 National Graduates Survey demonstrated that median estimated earnings increase with each level of post-secondary educational completed.[5] Most graduates of post-secondary institutions are having success finding employment in both good economic climates and bad, with almost 80% of employed graduates reporting a ‘close’ or ‘somewhat’ close relationship between their education and job 3 years after graduation.[6] Education is still a worthwhile investment for this generation.

Fortunately, the next recession is nowhere in sight. The business cycle is not yet in its late stages. Fears of an extended period of secular stagnation in the U.S. are unfounded. In fact, the underlying economic fundamentals—strong household balance sheets, manageable business sector leverage, highly capitalized and liquid banks, backlogs of consumer and housing demand—all point to the onset of an extended period of solid economic growth in the United States. In time, this will inevitably spill over into Canada. Millennials already have the skills and education for success. The positive economic climate on the horizon will give them the opportunities they need to fully realize their dreams.

Source:
[1] https://www.td.com/document/PDF/economics/special/YoungAndRestless.pdf
[2] https://www.td.com/document/PDF/economics/special/YoungAndRestless.pdf
[3] http://www.environicsanalytics.ca/docs/default-source/eauc2015-presentations/dougnorris-afternoonplenary.pdf?sfvrsn=6
[4] http://www.environicsanalytics.ca/docs/default-source/eauc2015-presentations/dougnorris-afternoonplenary.pdf?sfvrsn=6
[5] https://www.td.com/document/PDF/economics/special/YoungAndRestless.pdf
[6] https://www.td.com/document/PDF/economics/special/YoungAndRestless.pdf

Consumer Expectations and Technology: The Driving Changes of Disruption in Workplace Benefits and Pensions

This article originally appeared in 
Lēad Magazine, Issue 19–Industry Disruption: You can’t afford to tune out.

 
Article By Sun Life Financial

Our expectations as a society are changing. With the growing influence of millennials – and the speed of technological innovation – the bar keeps getting higher for meeting our evolving needs faster and more effectively. While technology will undoubtedly continue to transform the modes of healthcare and financial planning, the need for benefits and pensions will remain. People will still have to save for retirement, still want their dental and drug expenses reimbursed, and still require protection in the event of a catastrophic event such as a disability, major illness, or loss of life.

Nonetheless, technologies such as tele-healthcare, wearable devices and the Internet of Things (IoT) – along with the “big data” that they bring – are expected to create powerful changes for traditional insurance models. Our elementary needs may not be changing, but we’ve come to expect much more than just getting needs met – and millennials are among those pushing these demands.

Millennial employees have grown up with the internet; they have expectations of instant access to information and gratification. It is these expectations that are inspiring Sun Life to use innovative technologies to implement preventative healthcare programs and retirement savings for both Gen X and Gen Y workers alike.

From Convenience to Prevention: Changing Expectations in Group Benefits

As a society, we’ve become increasingly impatient with repetitive administrative tasks that eat our time. This was apparent even 10 or 15 years ago. At that time, preparing and mailing benefit claims was an example of what people were trying to avoid.

That is why, in 2001, our organization launched e-claims, where routine health and dental expenses could be claimed for reimbursement online. Ten-years later – with the explosion of mobile technology – we introduced an app that lets plan members submit claims from their smartphones, get instant adjudication of their claims and check on their pension plan balances.

Once revolutionary, those innovations became adopted virtually industry-wide and spread to other verticals such as banking. Years later, simple convenience is not enough for consumers and employees.  Modern consumers are looking for more.

At Sun Life, we believe employees are looking for empowerment. They want benefits that help to prevent illness rather than just treat it. In the group benefits area, this has led to 2 trends:

  • A focus on preventive benefits, known generally as wellness programs. These include elements such as fitness, nutrition, massage, mindfulness and yoga.
  • The capability to integrate an employee’s digital health information with platforms that track, incent and reward action steps toward better health and well-being.

In 2016, we’re seeing a perfect storm of disruption: an explosion in the technologies that enable a customized health and wellness experience coupled with rapidly changing consumer expectations towards prevention and personalization, led in part – in our view – by the increasing millennial presence in the workplace.

Mobile applications and websites are being used to support employer-sponsored wellness programs, from recording health statistics, to tracking fitness goals and monitoring an individual’s weight loss progress. And wearable technologies – such as Apple Watch and Fitbit – are being adopted in greater numbers, allowing the digital transfer of activity metrics instantaneously.

As our expectations for choice and flexibility intensifies, a strong push continues for flexible health spending accounts that allow the employee to either buy the coverage they need or spend on medical and wellness-related expenses at their own discretion. It is changing the way many employers are designing and funding their benefits plans.

Gamification in Retirement Saving: a Way to Combat Instant Gratification

It is no surprise that in this age of iTunes, Netflix, and Amazon, people expect everything to be “instant” – especially millennials who have known no other way. They want simplicity and they want choice, and they want whatever they choose to be delivered as close to immediately as possible.

Plan sponsors often find themselves at a disadvantage with pensions, as they can only offer the promise of savings or retirement income to be enjoyed decades later. It’s a tough fit in an instant gratification world. But plan sponsors and providers are using technology to break through.

At Sun Life, we implemented the principles of gamification into our retirement saving program and we’ve seen it work first hand: it’s helping to popularize the benefits of saving and motivating employees to take action. Gamification uses the same elements that make games innately fun and engaging, and applies them to tools and processes that typically aren’t considered a game. In 2013, Sun Life launched a gamified online program – money UP – to increase the financial literacy of employees who have a Sun Life workplace retirement plan through their employer. Money UP challenges plan members to learn more about their retirement plan by completing a series of missions and games. It’s a fun, innovative program that can increase financial knowledge and help plan members complete important retirement and investment planning steps along the way.

Gamification can be effective among all generations, but millennials may gravitate towards it even more than others do. Gamified environments give them goals to accomplish, let them track progress towards those goals and provide a community to compete, collaborate and share with. While these elements are essential to any motivation program, they are particularly critical to millennials, who are accustomed to fast feedback and online learning.

In our world, it has been a game-changer. Millennials have not only been the most active users of money UP at 39% of players in the game, they are also most likely to take action: 39% opened a new product or increased their savings contributions in real life because of it. [1] The successes of gamification are expected to be applied to a wide range of industries and solutions looking to increase human motivation and compliance – from customer engagement, training and education, to sustainability, human resources, and health and wellness.

The Next Wave

The explosion in technology – especially mobile technology – is perhaps at its most disruptive in mature industries that haven’t traditionally relied on technology to build their businesses. Industries like print, taxis, and bricks and mortar video stores have all experienced massive change and decline.

But all industries – group benefits and retirement included – are vulnerable to disruptive change. We’re seeing it firsthand. The world is moving forward on the technology front with or without us. And expectations for simplicity, choice and personalization have long passed the tipping point. So we at Sun Life are all in – and will continue to work with the aim of meeting the changing needs and expectations of this new and growing generation of employees.


Sun Life Financial: 
The featured article is a collaboration piece between Sun Life’s Group Benefits and Group Retirement Services. Sun Life Financial is a leading international financial services organization with deep roots in Canada dating back over 150 years. They provide a diverse range of protection and wealth accumulation products and services to individuals and corporate customers, with the goal on helping Canadians achieve lifetime financial security.

[1] Results are from December 2013 through March 2016