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Posts from the ‘Industry News & Trends’ Category

2017 Trends and the Impact on Workforce Compensation

Staying up-to-date with current marketplace and compensation trends has become increasingly important in light of many of the labour market changes that have occurred, and are still ahead.

This year brought a rise in Canadian employment. According to Statistics Canada’s October 2017 Labour Force Survey, on a year-over-year basis, total employment rose by 308,000 (+1.7%), with full-time work increasing by 397,000 (+2.7%) and the number of people working part time declining by 89,000 (-2.5%). On a year-over-year basis, total hours worked were up 2.7%.

It is undeniable that 2017 has brought much change to Canada’s labour market. From increasing pressure to raise minimum wage, the evolution of Bill 148 in Ontario, developments in globalization, potential changes in NAFTA, and the rise of virtual workers- the intricacies related to the manner in which we work, and are compensated have been impacted.

Change in Minimum Wage
October 1, 2017 marked the fourth consecutive year of minimum wage increases. Minimum wage now ranges from $10.35 to $13.60 across Canada. With continuing pressure to increase the minimum wage as high as $15/hour by 2019, as an employer, it’s essential to assess your current staffing levels and create a compensation strategy that works with the inevitable labour cost increases.

Bill 148 – Fair Workplaces Better Jobs Act

Bill 148 has now passed third reading which means that it is in the final stages of being enacted into law.  It will cause substantial changes to compensation and staffing requirements in Ontario. The impetus for this change is the influx of economic change within society has put an economic strain on Ontario households.[1]

Amongst the list of items, this bill will:

  • Increase the minimum wage to $15/hour by 2019
  • Require equal pay for full-time, part-time, contract, temporary and seasonal labour
  • Provide for scheduling, vacation and personal emergency leave entitlements

Economists predict a minimum wage increase to $15/hour will create a ripple effect for employees who already earn wages in that bracket. Also, the increase in wage means employers will pay more for items calculated as a percentage of pay, such as, payroll, taxes, CPP, EI, benefits and company pension attributions.

Globalization

Globalization is a trend that has influenced the Canadian Manufacturing sector for many years. Tariff Reductions, Free Trade Agreements and, reductions in transportation and communication costs, have fueled the growth of this trend.[2] Manufacturing industries within Canada have faced intense international competition, especially from imports from low-wage developing countries. The 2017 increase in minimum wage, and the potential minimum wage increase only widens this gap in competition – making it difficult for Canadian manufacturing companies to compete.

In addition, the internet, technology and computer networking facilitates the outsourcing of other employment sectors such as Business, IT and Customer Service. As an example, it isn’t uncommon to contact a Canadian company’s help desk and be assisted by a representative in another country.

The increase in these globalization trends continues to affect the Canadian marketplace, and inevitably, the workforce’s compensation in these sectors.

The Re-Negotiation of NAFTA

The 2017 administration change in the United States brought the imminent re-negotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement. A result that has brought the possibility of increased border taxes on goods imported to the United States. This pending change would have a huge impact on how Canadians trade, forcing us to consider trade options with Europe and Asia, and, putting Canadian Businesses in direct competition with American business.[3]

The Rise of Virtual Workers

One growing trend in the 2017 Canadian labour market is the rise of virtual workers. The global digital marketplace for workers, with online platforms such as Freelancer.com and UpWork, allow candidates from all over the world to create profiles, advertise their skills and bid on work. This trend is causing the dissemination of a variety of traditional labour positions such as administrative assistants, copywriters and marketing assistants. Employers are now able to source out projects to these sites where the cost of labour is cheaper – ultimately increasing their bottom line and affecting compensation.

Need help building a compensation plan that considers trends? Not a problem, we’ve done it for you! Adecco’s 2018 Compensation Guide provides insights into Canadian compensation data that’s segmented by role, province and company size.

Contact your local Adecco branch to receive your complimentary copy of our 2018 Compensation guide. Stay tuned for the digital version coming out in early December.

For more information and articles, visit our Employer resources page on our website.


Sources:

[1] Bill 148: Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act, 2017, September 2017

http://www.occ.ca/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/Proposed-Changes-to-Ontarios-Employment-and-Labour-Laws-CANCEA-Final-September-2017.pdf

[2] The Changing Workplaces Review – Final Report – Chapter 3, May 2017

https://www.ontario.ca/document/changing-workplaces-review-final-report/chapter-3-changing-pressures-and-trends

[3] Labour Force Survey, October 2017
https://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/171103/dq171103a-eng.htm?HPA=1

 

Automation Gives as it Takes

By: Federico Vione, CEO of Adecco General Staffing and Pontoon, North America, UK and Ireland

Improvements in technology are the catalyst for amazing innovation, but the level of fear over how recent improvements will affect the workplace has never been higher.

Fear is in the employee, who reads that half of all North American jobs are at risk of being replaced through automation and worries their job may soon be obsolete.

Fear is in the employer, who takes risks and incurs costs by embracing and implementing new technology.

And yes, fear is in the staffing industry, as agencies witness clients replace jobs with automation and robotics.

But where there is fear—where there is a challenge—there is opportunity.

We are in a period of transition, not extinction. Yes, automation is gradually reshaping the workforce, and today’s jobs will not be identical to tomorrow’s, but there will be jobs. And while it is the responsibility of employees and employers to prepare for that next chapter, we are here to help. Adecco is partnering with organizations across the globe on job training programs designed to prepare workers for this opportunity.

The University of Phoenix recently presented an ad that is a great example of promoting this opportunity, highlighting a modern “Rosie the Riveter” living through the pain of losing her job to automation. How does Rosie overcome this? Through education of course. Particularly by developing a new skill set and applying it to an industry which had not yet been affected by automation.

It is an uplifting story, but where do we go from here—where do you go? As an employee, identify if the work you do is likely to be impacted by automation. If so, be proactive and prepare yourself for the future. Just like Rosie, develop an array of skills that will make you an asset regardless of technology’s impact. As an employer, recognize the power you have to invest in your employees for the future of your company. Offer opportunities to build their resilience and grow skills that will be a necessity in your evolving workplace.

My colleague and Adecco Chief Marketing and Communications Officer Stephan Howeg recently published an article for the World Economic Forum titled “Why robots should inspire hope, not fear.” We share the same optimistic sentiment for the future and it trickles down throughout our organization.

We are just as confident in our ability to help prepare the workforce to work alongside new technology as we are proud to partner with governments, businesses and job seekers to fulfill that mission.

 

Federico is the Regional Head North America, UK & Ireland, Adecco and Pontoon.

Federico Vione joined Adecco in 1999 as Branch Manager and was subsequently appointed Manager of the Abruzzo-Molise area. In 2001, he became the National Key Account Manager for the Chemical and Pharma sector, and subsequently for the Large-Scale Trade sector. In 2002, he was appointed General Manager of the Professional Staffing business Ajilon S.r.l., and in 2004 he became General Manager of Ajilon Switzerland. In 2005, Federico Vione was appointed Project Leader Global Account Management Adecco Group and subsequently Head of Eastern Europe. In January 2009, he was appointed Country Manager Adecco Italy. Federico Vione was Vice President of Assolavoro (Assoziazione Nazionale delle Agenzie per il Lavoro), Italy, between 2010 and 2012.

ACSESS CHAMPION: ADECCO Canada Adecco Canada opens the doors of power to support future leaders

Article by ACSESS Canada

It took a leap of faith for Gilbert Boileau, President of Adecco Canada, to swing open the doors of his office for a month.

That’s exactly what he did. In June, Gilbert invited Alana Couvrette, (pictured above with Gilbert) a 22-year-old student studying public administration and political science at the University of Ottawa, to job shadow him, as part of his company’s CEO for One Month program. As part of the process, she would also share her journey along the way on social media.

Boileau is big believer in giving everyone at all levels a chance to excel but had some reservations. “I questioned how it would come together, yet was intrigued to see the outcome. I would need to allow someone in ‘my bubble,’” explains Gilbert, “but for the program to work effectively, Alana needed to be able to shadow me as I carried out my day. Her job shadowing covered everything, including confidential meetings with other colleagues, events and client meetings. You name it. In the end it was a huge success and I would sincerely recommend it to any CEO.”

This experience was also enlightening for Gilbert. “It was so interesting to share my experience with a young person and fascinating to see things through Alana’s eyes. It forces you to think about things you haven’t considered in years. She is impressive on so many levels. Her energy and enthusiasm was felt by the many teams. Armed with her political background, she was inquisitive, probing and asked me some tough questions. I had to explain so many things to Alana because she has very little background in our industry. It made me reflect on the way I do things…”

Alana was chosen from more than 2,300 applicants to become Adecco Canada’s first ever CEO for One Month, a global program that is part of the company’s Way To Work initiative. Gilbert’s passion for the program and willingness to participate sparked after hearing the global CEO for One Month speak at an international company conference.

“This program is positioning us as an industry leader in attracting the next generation of leaders with our flexible, open and inclusive work environment,” says Christine Marinho, Adecco Canada’s Director of Marketing for The Adecco Group in Canada. “The Millennials represent 37 per cent of the Canadian workforce with 28 per cent of them in managerial roles. The Baby Boom generation is transitioning out of the workforce and we want to foster a supportive environment where we develop leadership talents, encourage the sharing of ideas and provide mentorship at all levels. Our CEO for One Month program allows us to ‘walk the walk’ and provide access to one exceptional leader who will share their experience in real-time with employees and potential candidates via social media.”

What was it like for Alana to be given this extraordinary opportunity?

“It was overwhelming and inspiring in every possible way. I never realized you could get so much done with so little sleep,” she says jokingly. “Yet, I would wake up every morning, excited to be able to do it all again. I had no idea what a CEO does and I wasn’t very familiar with the staffing and employment industry. I’ve had a total of five jobs in my life and now I was working with the CEO.” Watch one of Alana’s Day in the Life video updates.

She and Gilbert instantly clicked. “He treated me as an equal, as we leapt head first into his jam-packed schedule, where we met with amazing Adecco clients, discussed their needs and worked with employees from every function across the organization. Everyone was so committed and excited.”

Alana found Adecco employees to be very special. “They are ‘people’, people, so warm and welcoming. I really enjoyed travelling to meet with clients at their offices and learning about the services Adecco offers. I saw firsthand how fascinating the staffing industry is and how much Adecco cares for its clients and candidates. There are so many myths about the industry. I was in so many meetings about placing candidates and I saw how hard they work to get candidates the best benefits and compensation.”

Some of Gilbert and Alana’s favourite moments were driving to client meetings together and discussing industry issues. It’s where they discovered how the generational divide sparks great debate and fosters understanding. “Both Gilbert and I like to be challenged, to be proven wrong and be shown the faults in our reasoning,” says Alana. “It made for many lively conversations between the two of us. He has a fascinating background and it’s rare for me to have the full attention of someone with his experience. I think we pushed each other to see the world from each other’s eyes.” Alana shares her thoughts on how Millennials and Baby Boomers can help each other enhance their leadership skills in this blog post

Adds Gilbert: “I enjoyed our debates. I think it’s so important for Alana to not only challenge me, but everyone she is working with. There were some interesting debates and I am glad I created a haven for her to share her insights, which was eye opening for us both. This program is meant to benefit Alana but I learned so much as well. It’s not often that you get the opportunity to have someone sitting beside you and observing how you work. She helped me see myself in a different angle, from the viewpoint of someone looking from the outside in.”

What’s next for Alana now that’s she’s helped lead the Canadian group of a multi-million dollar organization for one month? She is being considered along with 48 finalists from around the world for the honour of acting as Adecco’s Global CEO for One Month, shadowing Alain Dehaze, The Adecco Group’s Global CEO. The Global CEO for One Month selected will also receive a salary of 15,000 Euros. You can help Alana achieve her dream of becoming Adecco’s global CEO FOR ONE MONTH. Anyone can rate the candidates.

“I am so proud of Alana,” says Gilbert. “She was thrown in the water and swam so impressively. She had more of a theoretical view of the business world and she was able to see it in practice. It was amazing how poised she was considering everything she went through, meeting so many different stakeholders and engaging in real world discussions. To be able to work with the CEO at a macro level, at her age, is remarkable.”

 

The original article was written by Acsess Canada and can be seen on their website: Click here

As the national voice of recruiting, employment and staffing services industry, the Association of Canadian Search, Employment & Staffing Services (ACSESS) leads Canada to work. ACSESS advances best practices and ethical standards for the staffing industry through advocacy, government relations, professional development, resources and research.

Reaching a Middle Ground: Reconciling the Millennial Generation with the Boomers

By Alana Couvrette, 2017 CEO for Month

By 2025, Millennials will represent 75% of the total global workforce[1]. Considering these numbers, I would argue that one of the greatest challenges our society will face is reconciling the Millennial generation with the more seasoned one, the Boomers.

A lot of generational stereotypes are out there. Pundits will say that Boomers are old, set in their ways and technophobes. Millennials, on the other hand, are viewed as selfish, entitled and hopeless narcissists. However, instead of pointing fingers, we should think more constructively and put our efforts into identifying ways to stop this growing generational chasm.

Although at the individual level, there is cause for a change in mentality, thought leadership should originate chiefly at the macro level: through organizations. Workplaces are where generational reconciliation must occur, which means that organizations must play a leading role in creating the conditions for its success.

Initiatives like Adecco’s CEO for One Month help this reconciliation effort by breaking down institutional and hierarchical silos. On one hand, it allows the millennial generation to interact directly with senior management, giving them a chance to learn from their expertise and vast experience. It’s an opportunity for the Boomer’s institutional memory to be transferred to younger generations.

On the other hand, it also encourages senior management to move out of their comfort zone and incites them to be open to new ideas. Millennials can help Boomers stay relevant, in a world of constant change.

However, we don’t need initiatives as articulate as CEO for One Month to create change. It can be as simple as implementing a mentoring program or organizing weekly “Lunch with Senior Management” sessions, to foster dialogue between employees.

We shouldn’t pursue this objective simply because “it’s the right thing to do”. There is pragmatic impetus to unite generations. In the long run, investing in bridging generational gaps will result in a stronger, more efficient work culture.

Successfully navigating our intergenerational future requires crafting the right organizational strategies -sooner rather than later.

[1] https://www.forbes.com/sites/workday/2016/05/05/workforce-2020-what-you-need-to-know-now/#3b1973c2d632

Canada Ranks 13th in the 2017 Global Talent Competitiveness Index

gtci-2017-full-reportThe Adecco Group has once again partnered with INSEAD and the Human Capital Leadership Institute to produce the Global Talent Competitiveness Index (GTCI) — an annual benchmarking report that ranks 118 countries according to their ability to grow, attract and retain talent.

Launched for the first time in 2013, The GTCI provides a tool-kit for governments, businesses, organizations and personnel throughout the world to prepare them for the future of work. Its wealth of data and analysis is intended to help countries overcome talent mismatches and be competitive in the global marketplace.

Why is talent so important?

Talent has become the ‘currency’ of the global labour market and therefore something that decision makers in business, policy and academia need to understand in depth.

Talent is increasingly becoming the subject of intense debate, and these arguments are not simply about skills shortages. Talent competitiveness lies at the heart of important societal issues, such as unemployment, immigration, education and economic growth — whether in the context of restoring post-crisis prosperity, creating jobs for the young, maintaining momentum in high-growth economies or lifting entire nations out of poverty.

The global workforce must recognize the skills they will need for the future, governments must understand how they can secure the right to work for their citizen and countries need to ensure they remain competitive in the global economy.

What global talent trends have emerged?

The 2017 study focuses on how technology is affecting talent competitiveness and the nature of work, exploring both significant challenges and opportunities, and important shifts away from traditional working approaches.

trends

 

Read more

Hackathons: An Innovative Trend That Can “Shortcut” IT Recruitment

hackathon

laura-tarrant_headshot_finalLaura Tarrant is a Senior Account Executive for Roevin Technology— Adecco’s specialized IT division. Laura’s focus on IT recruitment and career coaching has led her to become a true expert in the field. Her monthly blogs dedicated to the IT field receive 2,400 followers from within the technology industry.  She understands that talent is more than just a skill set; her innovative and engaging recruitment strategies minimize inefficiencies of the recruiting life cycle while delivering stellar IT talent to her clients.

Below, Laura provides Adecco Lēad Blog readers with cutting edge IT recruitment trends.

Many innovative companies—particularly those in tech—rely on hiring big-picture thinkers to propel their organizations forward and keep them on the cutting edge. Many, unfortunately, are experiencing a technical talent shortage. In order to capture talent that thinks outside the box, employers need to implement creative recruitment tactics to match.  One such method that has proven incredibly successful and popular in recent years is the hackathon!

What are hackathons? They sound sinister…

Despite their name, there is nothing dubious about them. Started in Silicon Valley, hackathons are usually two-day (or sometimes week-long) networking events where like-minded people gather to solve development or organizational problems, grow their knowledge and produce impressive technology.  Many are hosted by think-tanks, tech companies, incubators, NGOs or major corporations. Brilliant young developers, designers and systems architects take part while industry veterans judge their work. Savvy recruiters and employers can take advantage of these events by connecting with both sets of attendees.

Why are they useful for recruitment?

They are an inexpensive recruitment strategy which can give you access to on-a-dime interviews with a variety of brilliant technical talent, let you see their soft skills and problem-solving abilities “in the wild” and get a sense of how they will perform on the job. In fact, many participants take part precisely to impress recruiters or employers who may be monitoring the event. Often, a job position or internship is marketed as the “prize” for taking part!

In addition to the recruitment and networking opportunities these events offer, hackathons can be held internally to introduce fun, creativity and competition into otherwise non-stimulating workplace processes.

Below is a peek into the types of hackathons that have become popular, tips for tech candidates on taking part and advice for employers and recruiters on sponsoring existing hackathons or organizing their own.

Virtual Hackathons

Virtual hackathons take place online and often for the purpose of sourcing international talent.  During these hackathons, participants are given programming concepts to contemplate or a programming challenge to solve—allthewhile competing for the overall title of “champion” and a spot on the leaderboard.

Recruitment Perspective: Organizations are given an inside look at how developers, scientists, students, entrepreneurs and educators from around the world approach problem-solving and compete against each other. If you are a small team with a limited budget—but have the ability to advertise and create brand awareness overseas—this recruitment ‘hack’ is highly recommended for your recruitment efforts.

Tip: For step-by-step instructions on attending and setting up a virtual hackathon, visit: http://www.the-hackfest.com/tips-virtual/

Interactive Hackathons

Interactive hackathons are conducted at pre-defined locations and begin with a presentation about the rules and theme of the event. Attendees are giving an opportunity to brief participants on a project they are working on with an obstacle they need help overcoming. Talent in this battle-of-the-brains ranges from “junior” to “subject-matter experts” who join together to unlock problems and suggest ideas while working in teams based on their individual interests and skills. At the conclusion of an interactive hackathon, a collaborative wrap-up session gives each team a chance to present and explain their findings, execution and achievements.

Recruitment Perspective: Let’s face it—traditional interviews with developers don’t always reveal how a candidate will fit into a company’s culture or if they will succeed in a real-time work environment. Interactive hackathons not only offer the ability to discover these unknowns, they are a less intimidating approach to recruitment and give employers the opportunity to perform on-a-dime interviews while networking with upcoming talent.

Tip: For a step-by-step guide on successfully running an interactive hackathon visit: https://hackathon.guide/

In-House Hackathons

As mentioned, hackathons are not exclusive to external recruitment efforts. They can be a great way for your staff to tackle an organizational problem together, solve development challenges or address your clients’ issues.  Your employees can also use them to prove their skills, management abilities and try out new roles. It’s no wonder that internal hackathons are increasingly being used by major corporations such as Manulife, Deloitte and many others.

If you’d like to administer your own internal hackathon, start by coming up with a project collectively and then setting up small teams of 2-5 employees.  Deliver the challenge and watch as the creative juices begin to flow. Fight the temptation to direct your team on how to do things during this event. While it may be hard to resist, you will boost participation by allowing your team to have a hand in every detail along the way to the solution.  By utilizing internal hackathons, you will foster a work environment that breeds innovation and challenges employees to build things creatively without a specific roadmap.

HR Perspective: Never underestimate your ability to unleash the hidden talents of your internal teams. Hackathons work as a tool for getting one’s feet wet into new ways of thinking.  They spark innovation, foster trust, engage employees, strengthen communication, encourage interaction and build strong collaborative teams who work towards a common goal. When a solution is constructed together, it is much more likely to stick.

Tip: For a step-by-step on running your first in-house hackathon visit: https://stormpath.com/blog/running-your-first-internal-hackathon

In today’s “Talent War”—in which people change jobs frequently, competition is global, salaries are competitive and opportunities are everywhere—smart, tech-savvy, agile workers are highly in demand, yet hard to recruit. Companies want to hire the best and brightest but rarely devise an innovative hiring process to make them stand out from other potential employers.  Hackathons can be a great tool in your arsenal to get you the forward-thinking IT talent you’re seeking.

Get more IT recruitment tips from Laura on Twitter @Recruiter_4_You and LinkedIn.