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Posts from the ‘Corporate Culture’ Category

5 Tips to Retain Your Talent Pool

With the labour market becoming increasingly competitive, employers are finding it challenging to retain their talent. Employees are keeping an eye out for better opportunities, or are contacted by headhunters with offers too good to refuse.

At Adecco, we know that great employees are hard to find. To help navigate you through this reality, we’ve got five main employee retention tips..

  • Provide internal growth and development opportunities

No employee wants to be stuck in a so-called “dead-end” job. Internal growth and development starts from day one! Establish a strong on-boarding training resources. Consider setting a review schedule to meet individually with your staff to set goals and create action plans that help them progress. This will also help to continue to motivate them and feel appreciated.  Promoting internal growth and development highlights your belief in their success.

  • Create a positive workplace culture

The average Canadian spends 90,000 hours at work during their lifetime.[i] That’s approximately one third of someone’s life! This is why colleagues are often referred to as a second family or work family. Make sure to foster these relationships. Hold luncheons, celebrate birthdays and holidays, hold contests and team building events. These may seem like small incentives, but they can have a big impact in making the workplace more enjoyable and inclusive.

  • Foster open communication between management and staff

It is often said — Employees do not leave companies, they leave managers.  Create an open-door policy for management within your office to make them more approachable to staff members. Encourage employees to express any concerns or ideas they may have to make the office better. Start a dialogue! Hold weekly meetings to discuss workplace issues, highlight business successes, and, bridge conversations between management and staff members.

  • Work/life balance

With an increased presence of technology in the workplace, the way we work is continuously evolving. From freelancing, to flex hours, to working from home — the ability to connect to the office virtually on a multitude of platforms enables employees to have more freedom than ever before. Consider providing your staff with laptops, and letting them to work from home one day a week. Or, offer a “flextime” option  and let them work a set number of hours a week on their own schedule.  You may even consider paying them hourly and allowing them to leave once their workload is complete. When an employee has the flexibility to manage their work with their personal life many witness an increase in productivity and a happier employee!

  • Consult job stat sites/compensation guides

If you don’t offer competitive pay and benefits, you’re already out of the game. Financial compensation is a huge motivator for employees. They know their worth and if another company meets or exceeds that value, it won’t be long before you receive a resignation letter. Consult reputable job stat sites/compensation guides to determine fair financial compensation from the get go. Don’t forget; compensation is not just salary. Benefit packages can be equally enticing to an employee. Make sure you have a benefit plan that is as diverse as your staff to support all their needs.

If you would like to view Adecco’s Compensation Guide, contact your local Adecco branch to receive your complimentary copy of our 2018 Compensation Guide. Stay tuned for the digital version coming out in early December.

Unfortunately, there is no way to eliminate turnover altogether, however, when it comes to retention a little effort does goes a long way. When an employee feels satisfaction in their job and receives recognition, they are less likely to peruse job boards or return that call from the headhunter. By hiring your employee, you have bought into them, now give them a reason to buy into you!

For more information and articles, visit our Employment resources page on our website.


[i]  The Globe and Mail, 2017

https://beta.theglobeandmail.com/life/top-five-tips-for-creating-work-with-purpose/article36352867/?ref=http://www.theglobeandmail.com&

 

Persistence and You

By Andrea Mancini, Adecco Canada National Account Executive


Success is all about persistence and doing the right thing for the long term.
-Bruce Rauner

 

In a world where it often feels like all your problems could be solved with one app click, I have found that the formula for success requires more effort and good old-fashioned persistence. Any successful sales champion will tell you that they did not reach the top of their game by hoping for success to knock at their door. Instead, they’ll probably tell you that sales success requires patience, confidence and grit–all qualities that are part of being persistent.

You either have what it takes to make it in sales or you don’t. Why? Because sales requires you to face yourself and your brand every single day—a difficult task when your brand is intangible. Sales also draws on your own innate characteristics. However, while you cannot “teach” sales, you can develop your innate skills and combine it with a positive, persistent attitude, to become a sales champion that is resistant to any economic conditions.

Here’s how:

Don’t take it personally
You will hear “no” many times in your pursuit to be a sales champion. The key is to hear it, acknowledge it politely, and remember, it’s not personal. The receiver is not saying “no” to you, they’re just saying “no, not now.” And there could be many reasons why they’ve responded this way. Your job is to persist and find out; why not now. It could be because you haven’t given them a reason to say yes.

Knowledge is power
Understanding a prospective client is fundamental to being able to present them with something they’ll want to say “yes” to. Be persistent and thorough when approaching a sales lead or prospect. Your job is to explore and understand who they are even before you get your foot in the door. What are their objectives, what is new in their world, why would they want to talk to you and allow you in their space?

So what?
With the rise of customer sophistication combined with all of your competitors knocking on your client’s door, you need to give them a reason to let you in. You need to persuasively present a compelling value proposition that demonstrates that you understand how you can add value and make it easier for the buyer. Otherwise, you’ll be faced with a literal or figurative “so what?” Until you can answer that question, be persistent.
A useful exercise is to refer back to how you buy. Take the example of buying new shoes. If you go into the shoe store knowing that you need running shoes, but the salesperson keeps showing you a hiking boot, they can describe its benefits all they want—that it’s on sale, made of good quality leather, how fashionable it is—but all you want is someone to point you to the best running shoes, at the best price, so you can run that 5k. Know what your buyer is buying and you’ll be able to anticipate and meet their expectations.

Be Authentic
We all know that buyers buy from people they trust. And the way you build trust is to be persistent in communicating your interest in helping your buyer, have the knowledge to back it up, and be yourself. Posturing, “sucking up”, or “buying” your client may work in the short-term, but you may suffer negative consequences in the long-term. Trust your abilities and your main objective to help your client and everything will eventually fall into place..

Grit with a cherry on top
Don’t underestimate the delicate balance of being persistent while remaining kind and professional. In my early years of selling, when I asked my prospects why they agreed to meet with me, they would affectionately comment that it was because “ you wouldn’t stop calling.” I took that as a semi-compliment, interpreting it as: “ you were persistent but not pushy, and I don’t know why but I like you, so now what are you going to do for me?” The art of not being pushy but still commanding attention comes from practice and the confidence that you have done your homework, you know why you want to sell something to a prospect, and, you love the chase!

Persistence is achieved by having an unwavering faith that your efforts are going to translate into a win one day. This requires patience, confidence, and a support system you trust. The process will require practice and possibly even reinvention, but if you stay positive and remain persistent, your goals will be within reach. Happy winning!

 

As a National Account Executive for Adecco Canada, Andrea Mancini’s primary focus is sales and contract negotiation for medium and large sized organizations. Her diverse background in the staffing industry has positioned her to create holistic solutions for her clients. Her many roles include Recruitment Management, Business Development, Field Manager, and National Sales. For over 10 years, Andrea has created long lasting client relationships by helping companies in the changing world of work. Many of her solutions have included implementing successful Master Vendor programs, creative Permanent Placement initiatives, and Large Volume solutions for employers of choice.  As a result, Andrea is a three-time recipient of prestigious sales awards in the staffing industry.

Andrea holds an Honours B.A. in Media Communications from Brock University.

Automation Gives as it Takes

By: Federico Vione, CEO of Adecco General Staffing and Pontoon, North America, UK and Ireland

Improvements in technology are the catalyst for amazing innovation, but the level of fear over how recent improvements will affect the workplace has never been higher.

Fear is in the employee, who reads that half of all North American jobs are at risk of being replaced through automation and worries their job may soon be obsolete.

Fear is in the employer, who takes risks and incurs costs by embracing and implementing new technology.

And yes, fear is in the staffing industry, as agencies witness clients replace jobs with automation and robotics.

But where there is fear—where there is a challenge—there is opportunity.

We are in a period of transition, not extinction. Yes, automation is gradually reshaping the workforce, and today’s jobs will not be identical to tomorrow’s, but there will be jobs. And while it is the responsibility of employees and employers to prepare for that next chapter, we are here to help. Adecco is partnering with organizations across the globe on job training programs designed to prepare workers for this opportunity.

The University of Phoenix recently presented an ad that is a great example of promoting this opportunity, highlighting a modern “Rosie the Riveter” living through the pain of losing her job to automation. How does Rosie overcome this? Through education of course. Particularly by developing a new skill set and applying it to an industry which had not yet been affected by automation.

It is an uplifting story, but where do we go from here—where do you go? As an employee, identify if the work you do is likely to be impacted by automation. If so, be proactive and prepare yourself for the future. Just like Rosie, develop an array of skills that will make you an asset regardless of technology’s impact. As an employer, recognize the power you have to invest in your employees for the future of your company. Offer opportunities to build their resilience and grow skills that will be a necessity in your evolving workplace.

My colleague and Adecco Chief Marketing and Communications Officer Stephan Howeg recently published an article for the World Economic Forum titled “Why robots should inspire hope, not fear.” We share the same optimistic sentiment for the future and it trickles down throughout our organization.

We are just as confident in our ability to help prepare the workforce to work alongside new technology as we are proud to partner with governments, businesses and job seekers to fulfill that mission.

 

Federico is the Regional Head North America, UK & Ireland, Adecco and Pontoon.

Federico Vione joined Adecco in 1999 as Branch Manager and was subsequently appointed Manager of the Abruzzo-Molise area. In 2001, he became the National Key Account Manager for the Chemical and Pharma sector, and subsequently for the Large-Scale Trade sector. In 2002, he was appointed General Manager of the Professional Staffing business Ajilon S.r.l., and in 2004 he became General Manager of Ajilon Switzerland. In 2005, Federico Vione was appointed Project Leader Global Account Management Adecco Group and subsequently Head of Eastern Europe. In January 2009, he was appointed Country Manager Adecco Italy. Federico Vione was Vice President of Assolavoro (Assoziazione Nazionale delle Agenzie per il Lavoro), Italy, between 2010 and 2012.

The Future of Women in STEM: A Multifaceted Approach

 

Katie Bieber is an IT Recruitment Consultant in Roevin’s Edmonton branch. She brings over three yearKatieBiebers of professional experience to her role and in Edmonton’s tech sector.  Katie focuses on clients in the IT realm and has developed exceptional connections and a network of candidates in the STEM field. She works with many passionate and pioneering candidates who overcome impressive hurdles as the only women applying for a role or being the only women on a team. Their perseverance and success have inspired her own passion for promoting women in the tech arena.


With March being National Engineering Month – coupled with International Women’s Day falling on March 8th — Adecco is continuing our look at the underrepresentation of women in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) fields.

The topic has become an increasingly important point of discussion. Various government bodies, reports, studies, organizations, mission statements and think tanks have explored it in recent years.  The problem has almost unanimous support — both from diversity advocates and the STEM sector itself. In 2010,  Natural Sciences and Engineer Research Council of Canada (NSERC) released an 84-page report on Women in Science and Engineering in Canada which explored the “under-representation of women in the various fields of science and engineering” and noted that this long-recognized problem was “of concern to the…NSERC”.

Are women really underrepresented in STEM?

Undeniably, yes!

WomeninSTEM_infographic

According to the 2011 National Household Survey, women accounted for only 39% of university graduates aged 25-34 with a STEM degree, compared with 66% of university graduates in non-STEM programs.  Moreover, the percentage of women working in the fields has barely changed in 30 years. In 1987, 20% of the STEM workforce were women. Today, it is still only 22%.

And as NSERC pointed out in their report, “Virtually all countries in the world, to varying levels, have fewer women than men studying in the NSE” (natural sciences and engineering).

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Webinar: How to answer the 15 most common interview questions

  This year marks a significant shift in the workforce. Millennials now represent the largest percentage of the workforce for the very first time, with 28% already sitting in management positions and 2/3 seeing themselves in management roles within the next ten years. As more millennials assume management positions, you may be noticing changes in […]

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Webinar: Millennials in Leadership Roles

 

millennials-webinar_dec7

This year marks a significant shift in the workforce. Millennials now represent the largest percentage of the workforce for the very first time, with 28% already sitting in management positions and 2/3 seeing themselves in management roles within the next ten years. As more millennials assume management positions, you may be noticing changes in the nature of the workplace. Why? Because there are distinct differences between the work styles, expectations, and career perspectives of this generation compared to their predecessors.

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