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Posts from the ‘Corporate Culture’ Category

Establishing your corporate social responsibility program

A well-executed corporate social responsibility program integrates a company’s commitment to global well-being into their business plan, creating a business model that is both profitable and  charitable.

Implementing a corporate social responsibility program within your organization is a win-win. While implementing programs that benefit your community, CSR programs can also create positive brand association for your business. Check out Adecco’s guide to establishing your corporate social responsibility program for help understanding corporate social responsibility and developing your own CSR program.

What is corporate social responsibility?

Simply put, a corporate social responsibility program helps hold companies accountable for the economic, social and environmental impact they have on society. A company’s CSR efforts work to improve local and global communities and can include donating funds or resources, volunteering, and initiating environmental practices.

Benefits of corporate social responsibility: technical financial graph on technology abstract background

What’s in it for your business?

If executed successfully, the benefits of corporate social responsibility for your organization are vast. Consumers are becoming better educated about where they spend their money, increasingly basing purchase decisions on more than the product or service themselves. In fact, 87% of consumers will make a purchase because the company advocated for an issue important to them. Undoubtedly, giving back to society helps make the world a better place, but it also improves public image of your brand, increases employee attraction and retention, and fosters relationships with investors.

Corporate social responsibility and success

What do some of the top Fortune 500 companies have in common? A successful CSR program that boosts their public image while contributing to the global community.

Starbucks lives and breathes CSR in every aspect of their business. They are committed to sourcing ethically-produced products, strengthening local communities and reducing their environmental impact through green stores, packaging and energy efficiency.

H&M has incorporated corporate social responsibility into their business by committing to fair living wages for workers in factories and creating sustainable fashion. Also, through their partnership with WWF, H&M focuses on responsible water management.

Ready to start your corporate social responsibility program?

Consider these helpful tips:

  1. Select a cause that fits within your corporate culture and organizational values. This will ensure your CSR efforts are authentic to your business. For example, if your business is in the food industry, create a program that provides food to those who need it or purchase your ingredients from local farmers.
  2. Create a plan of attack and identify metrics to hold your business accountable. Building your corporate social responsibility program into your business model will help to keep your business decisions in-line with your CSR values.
  3. Involve your employees and customers in donations or volunteering efforts. Getting your staff and audience involved emphasizes your dedication to the cause and reiterates your corporate social responsibility values.
  4. Publicize your corporate social responsibility accomplishments. This will highlight your commitment to making the world a better place, helping draw attention to the cause while also promoting positive brand recognition among your customers and colleagues alike.

Here at Adecco, we value the importance of a corporate social responsibility program to leave a positive impact on our global community. Our Win4Youth program unites employees, clients and associates in fitness to support Plan International’s efforts to improve young people’s lives through education and employment. Learn more about the Win4Youth program and start tracking your kilometres and activity hours at http://www.win4youth.com.

Lēad Blog is part of Adecco and Roevin Canada. Hire your perfect team, or get more staffing advice from our experts.

 

Flexible Work, Different Work Weeks

It’s no surprise that flexible work weeks reap great advantages for employees, but did you know that employers can also gain from flexible work arrangements? From promoting a positive work life balance to candidate retention and attraction, read on for how flexible work can benefit your organization.

Flexible work weeks have become a sought-after element of comprehensive benefits packages for employees. The ability to schedule their week as they feel fit enables employees to maximize their work-life balance while reducing the stress associated with commuting, child care and other demands. Given the benefits that flexible work arrangements offer employees, are you ready to let different work weeks make a positive impact on your workforce? Check out Adecco’s guide to flexible work and elevate your organization’s productivity today.

Three common types of flexible work:

Compressed work week

Simply put, compressed work weeks involve working more hours in fewer days, commonly consisting of four ten-hour days. The additional day off, often observed on Mondays or Fridays, gives your staff a longer weekend and a greater work-life balance.

Pros

Not only does a compressed work week offer your employees larger periods of time off, it also enables employers to extend their operation hours. Plus, employees are said to have greater job satisfaction, reducing employee turnover.

Cons

Long work days can lead to exhaustion and fatigue for your staff, affecting the overall productivity of your business.

 

Flexible work hours

With flexible work hours, employees are given the freedom to coordinate their daily schedule to accommodate their personal needs.

Pros

If executed successfully, flexible work hours enable employers to increase headcount without adding work stations through communal seats and computers. Flexible workers in general work longer hours, achieve more and are more satisfied with their work.

Cons

Although flexible work hours can yield benefits to your business’s bottom line, it has the potential to complicate communication. With employees working different hours, it can be challenging to find a time to schedule a meeting, thus hindering communication on joint projects.

 

Telecommuting/working from home

Telecommuting or e-commuting involves work performed from a remote location, often a home office. Employers may allow workers to telecommute a few days a week, or, based on the needs of the business, full-time.

Pros

Telecommuting, at its best, has the potential to enhance productivity among your employees. Working from a home office enables employees to complete their workload within their peak periods of productivity while maintaining a strong work-life balance.

Cons

Employees who telecommute lack opportunities to collaborate with colleagues, miss out on social activities and may find it hard to divide their professional work from their personal lives, all potentially affecting productivity and your business’s bottom line.

As an employer, it’s clear that offering your employees flexible work can be advantageous. Enabling a flexible work week has the potential to reduce tardiness and absenteeism, decrease turnover and attract top talent. It also facilitates employment for workers with children and workers with disabilities, ensuring your business has full access to top candidates regardless of their personal situations.

With proper execution, flexible work can accommodate the needs of your colleagues and business alike, helping to make your organization a great place to work.

Lēad Blog is part of Adecco and Roevin Canada. Hire your perfect team, or get more staffing advice from our experts.

 

Mental Health and the Workplace

The average professional spends 90,000 hours at work within their lifetime. With such a substantial portion of lives spent at work, employers need to be cognizant of how the workplace can trigger mental health issues, and in response, focus on creating an environment that fosters strong mental health amongst their workforce.

Mental health and our role in the workplace often co-exist. To many, their professional lives foster a social network and ensue a sense of purpose and accomplishment. However, being constantly connected through technology can make those 40-hour work weeks feel more like 24/7 — leaving little time to focus on self-health and self-help. Currently, 1 in 5 Canadians experience a mental health problem or illness each year.

As an employer, the benefits of promoting mental health awareness is twofold. Employees reap the benefits and your business profits do as well. When we think of lost time at work many relate it to physical injury or illness, but the reality is that 30% of disability claims are related to mental health problems. In Canada, the total cost of mental health problems and illnesses is $50 billion per year. Employees affected by mental health issues experience higher absence rates and decreased productivity, leaving companies with an increased turnover rate — making it hard to meet deadlines and achieve corporate goals.

Creating a foundation to support good mental health does not have to strain your business’ resources. It’s as simple as implementing specific strategies.

Identify and educate

Mental health illnesses are not always easily identifiable and can often be misinterpreted by individuals and companies.  An employee who frequently misses work, has decreased work performance and shows changes in their behaviour can often be tell-tale signs of a mental health illness.  In these cases, educating leaders on how to engage in conversations around mental health can help employees feel that they’re in a safe environment, open up about their issues and seek the appropriate support.

Resources and support

As an employer there are many ways to support an individual who may be facing a mental health illness.  To start, make educational tools on mental health issues available.  This could range from education materials to online self-assessments that are geared at helping individuals detect the signs and promote early intervention.  As well, providing benefit plans and compensation structure support such as therapy coverage and mental health days can provide employees with the resources to seek the help they need.

Action plans

Develop and implement policies and procedures to allow employees to feel safe to come forward and to breakdown any stigmas associated with psychological issues.  If a colleague exhibits signs of stress and anxiety, have an action plan in place to assist. Communicate without judgement, consider emotional triggers while being supportive and clear. Also, providing training for colleagues can help to erase the stigma around mental illnesses in your workplace.

Despite our best efforts in fostering a supportive work environment, mental health issues are not always preventable. A wide range of factors from biological to psychological to environmental can contribute to the development of mental illnesses. With so much time spent at work, employers need to focus on the signs and have resources readily available in order to help.

With a little effort, your workplace can have a large impact in maintaining the positive mental health of your workforce.

If you or anyone you know is in need, it’s important to seek the appropriate help. For information on the resources available throughout Canada visit mental health resources.

Showing Appreciation for Your Staff During the Holiday Season

It might be a holly jolly season, but the holidays can also be a stressful period for your employees. Juggling work with a busy personal life can leave colleagues feeling less than merry. Spread some cheer this holiday with some festive staff appreciation tips courtesy of your staffing experts at Adecco!

 The holidays tend to throw a wrench into normal business routines and practices. Whether it’s the substantial increase in business, or the stress of balancing a busy work period with an even busier social calendar, the build up to the end of the year rarely feels like the most wonderful time of the year. Help your organization conquer this stressful period, while motivating your staff to continue working hard with a few festive staff appreciation hacks!

Give thanks

A simple thank you is the easiest form of staff appreciation. Show your team your true gratitude by acknowledging their hard work and dedication within your organization. Recognize the individual skills that make each colleague an asset to the company. After all, a little appreciation can go a long way in building staff confidence and loyalty to your company.

Be flexible with work hours

Part of the stress of the season is the balancing act between work and the increased personal obligations many of us have around this time. Alleviate this stress by offering employees flexibility with their work hours. Encourage your employees to take an afternoon off, a longer lunch break or the option to start later or finish earlier in the day. This gives your staff a little flexibility when they find themselves trying to balance their work/home life during this busy period.

Get festive with your staff

Consider the holidays as a time to build your relationship with your staff. Allotting as little as an hour a week to indulge in festive snacks, decorations or holiday music can lift the spirits of your colleagues. You can also introduce some friendly competition with a cook off or arrange a cookie exchange. Even taking a few minutes for a festive group picture can be a nice change of pace for your employees during the busy season.

Celebrate traditions

Each member of your team is different, coming from varied backgrounds and celebrating many different traditions. What better time than the holidays to celebrate these differences? Ask your staff to share their traditions and work to build them into your holiday celebrations. This will lead to a more inclusive holiday experience and work environment for all your colleagues.

A holiday party THEY want

It’s easy to make an executive decision on a staff party, but are you taking into consideration what your team would enjoy? Whether it’s great food, games or a relaxing day away from the office, take the time to talk with your employees about what they would enjoy for a holiday party. Not only will the holiday party be better received, employees will greatly appreciate the consideration.

 

Follow Adecco’s tips for staff appreciation during the holiday season and not only will you build a stronger relationship with your staff, you will also be setting your organization up for a successful new year.

How to Get Started with Succession Planning

As employers prepare for the many baby boomers heading towards retirement, succession planning is essential to avoid large knowledge gaps and business disruptions. To get you started, we’re sharing three strategies to start retirement-proofing your organization.

As baby boomers create their retirement plans, employers are faced with overcoming the challenges of the knowledge and skills gaps that will be felt within their organizations once this occurs. To address these challenges and facilitate organizational knowledge transfer and continuity, it’s vital to identify and develop your organization’s future leaders. Help ensure that your company stays ahead of the (retirement) game with the following strategies.

1. Be proactive

Early detection is key. In order to plan and identify skills gaps, you need to initiate conversations with employees approaching retirement age. Build the conversation into an annual review and set reminders to follow up with colleagues who weren’t certain about their retirement plans.

2. Identify your successor

The size of your organization should be a consideration when determining succession strategies. Larger businesses can opt to promote from within their existing talent pools, but small to medium sized businesses may have a smaller pool to pull from, and can be left with larger gaps as a result of employee retirements.

Promote from within

More than simply selecting and promoting a candidate based on seniority, it’s important to learn about a candidate’s ambitions, goals and future plans. This will ensure that you are selecting a professional who is motivated to stay and develop within the organization. Employing personality and career assessment tools within your talent management process can help uncover those essential soft skills and personality traits that are challenging to identify but important to finding standout employees.

Look outside your organization

Based on the size or experience of your existing talent pool, promoting from within may not be a viable option. Your staff may not be ready for a corporate role, or you may not have been provided with enough notice to develop your future potential leaders. In selecting an external candidate, look for applicants that come from a similar industry and corporate culture. Not only will it make the transition easy for the new employee, but it will also minimize the disruption to existing colleagues.

3. Develop potential leaders

Once you’ve identified the candidate, it’s time to begin grooming them for their future roles. For employees who are new to your organization, make sure to allow a healthy training period with the retiring colleague to ensure a smooth transition for the organization as a whole.

Take inventory of skills

Begin by creating detailed job descriptions and skills lists for all existing employees approaching retirement. Consider the colleague’s full range of hard and soft skills or personality traits that have helped the colleague become so successful in their role. Try to gauge the skills your organization will require down the road based on the company’s development trends. This will help you gain a realistic understanding of the training required to get your successor up to speed.

Invest in career development tools

Developing your candidates is an investment and so, as an organization, you should be prepared to invest in career development tools such as training and online courses to help your candidate reach their full potential. Compare their current skills status to the inventory of skills created for the retiring individual to help build a training plan.

Create a mentorship program

Although skills can be gained through extra education or additional training, job knowledge can be trickier to transfer. Creating a mentorship program provides a direct opportunity for knowledge sharing amongst the retiree and their successor. Not only is mentorship critical for knowledge transfer, it enables the promoted mentee to receive feedback on career and interpersonal skills, ultimately increasing their self-confidence and placing them on track for success in their new role.

Without succession planning and a knowledge transfer strategy in place, your business faces the risk of losing critical organizational knowledge, potentially causing disruption to your day-to-day business operations and your company’s overall success. For more tips on succession planning, or for help in finding your team’s next successor, contact your local Adecco branch today!

Lēad Blog is part of Adecco and Roevin Canada. Hire your perfect team, or get more staffing advice from our experts.

Coping Strategies for Your Department’s Busiest Times

How your business manages workplace stress can have a big impact on your productivity, employee engagement and even retention. During your busy season, when the demands on your department can peak, having a set of stress relief strategies ready to go will help you tackle your busy season with confidence. In this article, Doug Hamlyn, VP, Finance, of Adecco Canada and Roevin, describes some of the best ways to help your employees manage workplace stress.  

When I hear the word “stress,” I think of steel beams and concrete columns and the tests they undergo to make them crack. Though this definition comes from my early career as a civil engineer, in a very similar way, I view work stress as the mental or emotional strain that we are subjected to from difficult or demanding work situations.

I have spent most of my career working in finance departments where stress in its many forms typically happens during quarter-end, year-end or budget season. The usual suspect is the classic ‘having too much work and too little time,’ but can also come from those unexpected events that we hadn’t factored into our timelines. Now, with these unexpected audits or projects on top of an already-full workload, we have plans and priorities that don’t align and family and work conflicts where compromise may not be an option. And if you add to that a manager who isn’t solution-focused, you can get a perfect storm of workplace stress.

As managers, it’s our job to find a way to deliver the results our business requires with minimal stress along the way.  Here are some ideas to help alleviate the pressure of peak season stress:

1. Plan ahead

Stress often comes from not having a plan, so give your employees a clear idea of how they’ll get through the busy season. Use the deadlines and workload you already know to develop your plan. Ensure that you also include buffer zones for last-minute or unexpected demands. You should also factor in your employees’ external commitments to get as realistic and attainable a plan as possible. With proper planning and scheduling, you can give your employees that extra bit of confidence that their time and workload is recognized and accounted for.

2. Vacation blackout period

At the hiring stage, make sure to communicate that there are times of the year when employees cannot take vacation. By setting these expectations ahead of time, you help ensure that all resources are available for your busy period.

3. Remain flexible

Determine which deadlines are firm and which are flexible. You may even have some leeway with external audit dates if you ask and have a valid rationale for delay. In addition, make sure you’re flexible with how you allow people to finish their work in lieu of ‘burning the midnight oil.’ For example, allow your employees to finish their work at home, start earlier, etc.

4. Sharing resources

Use external temporary resources to manage routine tasks and free up senior staff to tackle budgets or year-end functions. Make sure all your resources are cross-trained so that they can share assignments for increased staffing flexibility.

Thinking about expanding your temporary workforce? Explore your options with Adecco.

5. Say no

No is a powerful word. While you usually can’t say no to your boss or to your company’s fixed deadlines, think about the discretionary requests that you can say no to, such as attending a meeting when someone can update you later or taking on a new task that would be a better fit for a different department. For non-critical requests that you’d like to take on but don’t have the time for right now, consider saying “not now” and setting a date for the future.

6. Celebrate

Recognizing your team’s accomplishments can go a long way towards diffusing stress. Even if it’s just taking your staff for a coffee when a deadline is met or ordering in lunch if you can’t get away, small celebrations help demonstrate your appreciation for your staff’s hard work. Plus, these much-needed breaks give your staff some breathing room to help them see the bigger picture (and the eventual return to normalcy).

7. Stay healthy

Encouraging your staff to take steps to prioritize their health will benefit everyone, which is especially true if your busy season coincides with flu season. Encourage your employees to maintain healthy sleep schedules and their physical fitness to ensure that they are ready to tackle their tasks head-on when they’re at work, and to improve their at-home lives at the same time.

As we continue to do more with less, managing through busy periods will always be a challenge. But if you engage everyone in setting a work plan that takes into account each person’s unique and important commitments and their normal working hours, you can minimize the stress they will endure during these periods.

 

Doug HamlynDoug Hamlyn, B.Eng. and MBA, is the Vice President, Finance for Adecco Canada and Roevin. With 10 years in large, multinational public and private staffing companies and experience in the Canadian, U.S. and South African markets, Doug brings senior financial leadership to Adecco’s executive team. Along with his Finance, Real Estate, IT and Occupational Health & Safety teams, Doug’s focus is on regulatory compliance, business controls, process improvements and client support.

Lēad Blog is part of Adecco and Roevin Canada. Hire your perfect team, or get more staffing advice from our experts.