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Posts from the ‘Employers’ Category

Why a Job in Retail Should be Your Next Career Move

With the plethora of career prospects, retail seems to get a bad rap.

General consensus seems to be that a job in retail equates to terrible hours and waiting on challenging customers. It’s just not the case. A career in retail may just be one of the most rewarding careers you can chose!

Flexibility

Not a morning person? Who is! This isn’t your average 9-5 … and that can work to your advantage! One of the greatest benefits a career in retail offers is the flexibility to work around your life and priorities. Be it juggling childcare, education, or appointments, you’re able to choose from a variety of shifts and hours that fit YOUR schedule. Even if you’re looking to make some extra cash for that trip, or off-set holiday season expenses, part-time and seasonal opportunities allow you to do just that. Plus, you no longer have to waste vacation days on doctor’s appointments, or cramming chores into your weekends.

Variety

No day is the same. One day you could be learning a new product and the next day, advising customers. A career in retail means you’re hardly ever tied to a routine. Love meeting new people? You’ll meet tons! Engaging with customers and helping them find the right product to meet their needs is just one of the aspects that make this job so rewarding.

Get paid to work out

Carpal tunnel syndrome, tennis elbow, lumbar sprains and strains, and, disc injuries are just a few of the potential injuries from sitting at a desk 40-hours a week.[1] A retail job actually benefits your health! From constant moving to stocking merchandise, this career option offers a total body work out —allowing you to save on a gym membership. So, tie up those sneakers and watch your step count soar!

Discounts, discounts, discounts!

One of the most recognized perks of a career in this space is the discount you receive on the company’s products. Retailers make sure their staff is knowledgeable about their merchandise and brand. Be it clothes, electronics, or coffee, there is no arguing the benefits of an employee discount! With the holidays vastly approaching, who can deny a rebate on gifts?

Advancement opportunities

Companies love to promote from within. Especially in Retail. Nobody knows a product better than the people selling it, which is why this type of career is the best way to get your foot in the door! With a wide array of positions to develop into, such as, merchandising, store management, and, positions at head office, a career in retail may be the first step in landing your dream job.

And the number one reason…

Transferable skills

The transferable skills gained from a career (short or long) in retail are endless!
From problem solving and multi-tasking, to professional interaction and conflict resolution, the skills learned from your retail experience will benefit the rest of your personal and professional life. You learn amazing interpersonal skills and how to work under pressure. All skills that will be attractive to future employers!

Ready to begin your career in retail? Adecco has you covered! We have daily opportunities available with reputable companies such as Nespresso. Contact your local Adecco branch to learn how to jump start your career and start reaping the benefits!

For more information and articles, visit our Employment resources page on our website.


[1] Advanced Chiropractic – Common Computer Related Injuries
http://www.advancechiro.on.ca/common-computer-related-injuries/

 

2017 Trends and the Impact on Workforce Compensation

Staying up-to-date with current marketplace and compensation trends has become increasingly important in light of many of the labour market changes that have occurred, and are still ahead.

This year brought a rise in Canadian employment. According to Statistics Canada’s October 2017 Labour Force Survey, on a year-over-year basis, total employment rose by 308,000 (+1.7%), with full-time work increasing by 397,000 (+2.7%) and the number of people working part time declining by 89,000 (-2.5%). On a year-over-year basis, total hours worked were up 2.7%.

It is undeniable that 2017 has brought much change to Canada’s labour market. From increasing pressure to raise minimum wage, the evolution of Bill 148 in Ontario, developments in globalization, potential changes in NAFTA, and the rise of virtual workers- the intricacies related to the manner in which we work, and are compensated have been impacted.

Change in Minimum Wage
October 1, 2017 marked the fourth consecutive year of minimum wage increases. Minimum wage now ranges from $10.35 to $13.60 across Canada. With continuing pressure to increase the minimum wage as high as $15/hour by 2019, as an employer, it’s essential to assess your current staffing levels and create a compensation strategy that works with the inevitable labour cost increases.

Bill 148 – Fair Workplaces Better Jobs Act

Bill 148 has now passed third reading which means that it is in the final stages of being enacted into law.  It will cause substantial changes to compensation and staffing requirements in Ontario. The impetus for this change is the influx of economic change within society has put an economic strain on Ontario households.[1]

Amongst the list of items, this bill will:

  • Increase the minimum wage to $15/hour by 2019
  • Require equal pay for full-time, part-time, contract, temporary and seasonal labour
  • Provide for scheduling, vacation and personal emergency leave entitlements

Economists predict a minimum wage increase to $15/hour will create a ripple effect for employees who already earn wages in that bracket. Also, the increase in wage means employers will pay more for items calculated as a percentage of pay, such as, payroll, taxes, CPP, EI, benefits and company pension attributions.

Globalization

Globalization is a trend that has influenced the Canadian Manufacturing sector for many years. Tariff Reductions, Free Trade Agreements and, reductions in transportation and communication costs, have fueled the growth of this trend.[2] Manufacturing industries within Canada have faced intense international competition, especially from imports from low-wage developing countries. The 2017 increase in minimum wage, and the potential minimum wage increase only widens this gap in competition – making it difficult for Canadian manufacturing companies to compete.

In addition, the internet, technology and computer networking facilitates the outsourcing of other employment sectors such as Business, IT and Customer Service. As an example, it isn’t uncommon to contact a Canadian company’s help desk and be assisted by a representative in another country.

The increase in these globalization trends continues to affect the Canadian marketplace, and inevitably, the workforce’s compensation in these sectors.

The Re-Negotiation of NAFTA

The 2017 administration change in the United States brought the imminent re-negotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement. A result that has brought the possibility of increased border taxes on goods imported to the United States. This pending change would have a huge impact on how Canadians trade, forcing us to consider trade options with Europe and Asia, and, putting Canadian Businesses in direct competition with American business.[3]

The Rise of Virtual Workers

One growing trend in the 2017 Canadian labour market is the rise of virtual workers. The global digital marketplace for workers, with online platforms such as Freelancer.com and UpWork, allow candidates from all over the world to create profiles, advertise their skills and bid on work. This trend is causing the dissemination of a variety of traditional labour positions such as administrative assistants, copywriters and marketing assistants. Employers are now able to source out projects to these sites where the cost of labour is cheaper – ultimately increasing their bottom line and affecting compensation.

Need help building a compensation plan that considers trends? Not a problem, we’ve done it for you! Adecco’s 2018 Compensation Guide provides insights into Canadian compensation data that’s segmented by role, province and company size.

Contact your local Adecco branch to receive your complimentary copy of our 2018 Compensation guide. Stay tuned for the digital version coming out in early December.

For more information and articles, visit our Employer resources page on our website.


Sources:

[1] Bill 148: Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act, 2017, September 2017

http://www.occ.ca/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/Proposed-Changes-to-Ontarios-Employment-and-Labour-Laws-CANCEA-Final-September-2017.pdf

[2] The Changing Workplaces Review – Final Report – Chapter 3, May 2017

https://www.ontario.ca/document/changing-workplaces-review-final-report/chapter-3-changing-pressures-and-trends

[3] Labour Force Survey, October 2017
https://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/171103/dq171103a-eng.htm?HPA=1

 

5 Tips to Retain Your Talent Pool

With the labour market becoming increasingly competitive, employers are finding it challenging to retain their talent. Employees are keeping an eye out for better opportunities, or are contacted by headhunters with offers too good to refuse.

At Adecco, we know that great employees are hard to find. To help navigate you through this reality, we’ve got five main employee retention tips..

  • Provide internal growth and development opportunities

No employee wants to be stuck in a so-called “dead-end” job. Internal growth and development starts from day one! Establish a strong on-boarding training resources. Consider setting a review schedule to meet individually with your staff to set goals and create action plans that help them progress. This will also help to continue to motivate them and feel appreciated.  Promoting internal growth and development highlights your belief in their success.

  • Create a positive workplace culture

The average Canadian spends 90,000 hours at work during their lifetime.[i] That’s approximately one third of someone’s life! This is why colleagues are often referred to as a second family or work family. Make sure to foster these relationships. Hold luncheons, celebrate birthdays and holidays, hold contests and team building events. These may seem like small incentives, but they can have a big impact in making the workplace more enjoyable and inclusive.

  • Foster open communication between management and staff

It is often said — Employees do not leave companies, they leave managers.  Create an open-door policy for management within your office to make them more approachable to staff members. Encourage employees to express any concerns or ideas they may have to make the office better. Start a dialogue! Hold weekly meetings to discuss workplace issues, highlight business successes, and, bridge conversations between management and staff members.

  • Work/life balance

With an increased presence of technology in the workplace, the way we work is continuously evolving. From freelancing, to flex hours, to working from home — the ability to connect to the office virtually on a multitude of platforms enables employees to have more freedom than ever before. Consider providing your staff with laptops, and letting them to work from home one day a week. Or, offer a “flextime” option  and let them work a set number of hours a week on their own schedule.  You may even consider paying them hourly and allowing them to leave once their workload is complete. When an employee has the flexibility to manage their work with their personal life many witness an increase in productivity and a happier employee!

  • Consult job stat sites/compensation guides

If you don’t offer competitive pay and benefits, you’re already out of the game. Financial compensation is a huge motivator for employees. They know their worth and if another company meets or exceeds that value, it won’t be long before you receive a resignation letter. Consult reputable job stat sites/compensation guides to determine fair financial compensation from the get go. Don’t forget; compensation is not just salary. Benefit packages can be equally enticing to an employee. Make sure you have a benefit plan that is as diverse as your staff to support all their needs.

If you would like to view Adecco’s Compensation Guide, contact your local Adecco branch to receive your complimentary copy of our 2018 Compensation Guide. Stay tuned for the digital version coming out in early December.

Unfortunately, there is no way to eliminate turnover altogether, however, when it comes to retention a little effort does goes a long way. When an employee feels satisfaction in their job and receives recognition, they are less likely to peruse job boards or return that call from the headhunter. By hiring your employee, you have bought into them, now give them a reason to buy into you!

For more information and articles, visit our Employment resources page on our website.


[i]  The Globe and Mail, 2017

https://beta.theglobeandmail.com/life/top-five-tips-for-creating-work-with-purpose/article36352867/?ref=http://www.theglobeandmail.com&

 

Persistence and You

By Andrea Mancini, Adecco Canada National Account Executive


Success is all about persistence and doing the right thing for the long term.
-Bruce Rauner

 

In a world where it often feels like all your problems could be solved with one app click, I have found that the formula for success requires more effort and good old-fashioned persistence. Any successful sales champion will tell you that they did not reach the top of their game by hoping for success to knock at their door. Instead, they’ll probably tell you that sales success requires patience, confidence and grit–all qualities that are part of being persistent.

You either have what it takes to make it in sales or you don’t. Why? Because sales requires you to face yourself and your brand every single day—a difficult task when your brand is intangible. Sales also draws on your own innate characteristics. However, while you cannot “teach” sales, you can develop your innate skills and combine it with a positive, persistent attitude, to become a sales champion that is resistant to any economic conditions.

Here’s how:

Don’t take it personally
You will hear “no” many times in your pursuit to be a sales champion. The key is to hear it, acknowledge it politely, and remember, it’s not personal. The receiver is not saying “no” to you, they’re just saying “no, not now.” And there could be many reasons why they’ve responded this way. Your job is to persist and find out; why not now. It could be because you haven’t given them a reason to say yes.

Knowledge is power
Understanding a prospective client is fundamental to being able to present them with something they’ll want to say “yes” to. Be persistent and thorough when approaching a sales lead or prospect. Your job is to explore and understand who they are even before you get your foot in the door. What are their objectives, what is new in their world, why would they want to talk to you and allow you in their space?

So what?
With the rise of customer sophistication combined with all of your competitors knocking on your client’s door, you need to give them a reason to let you in. You need to persuasively present a compelling value proposition that demonstrates that you understand how you can add value and make it easier for the buyer. Otherwise, you’ll be faced with a literal or figurative “so what?” Until you can answer that question, be persistent.
A useful exercise is to refer back to how you buy. Take the example of buying new shoes. If you go into the shoe store knowing that you need running shoes, but the salesperson keeps showing you a hiking boot, they can describe its benefits all they want—that it’s on sale, made of good quality leather, how fashionable it is—but all you want is someone to point you to the best running shoes, at the best price, so you can run that 5k. Know what your buyer is buying and you’ll be able to anticipate and meet their expectations.

Be Authentic
We all know that buyers buy from people they trust. And the way you build trust is to be persistent in communicating your interest in helping your buyer, have the knowledge to back it up, and be yourself. Posturing, “sucking up”, or “buying” your client may work in the short-term, but you may suffer negative consequences in the long-term. Trust your abilities and your main objective to help your client and everything will eventually fall into place..

Grit with a cherry on top
Don’t underestimate the delicate balance of being persistent while remaining kind and professional. In my early years of selling, when I asked my prospects why they agreed to meet with me, they would affectionately comment that it was because “ you wouldn’t stop calling.” I took that as a semi-compliment, interpreting it as: “ you were persistent but not pushy, and I don’t know why but I like you, so now what are you going to do for me?” The art of not being pushy but still commanding attention comes from practice and the confidence that you have done your homework, you know why you want to sell something to a prospect, and, you love the chase!

Persistence is achieved by having an unwavering faith that your efforts are going to translate into a win one day. This requires patience, confidence, and a support system you trust. The process will require practice and possibly even reinvention, but if you stay positive and remain persistent, your goals will be within reach. Happy winning!

 

As a National Account Executive for Adecco Canada, Andrea Mancini’s primary focus is sales and contract negotiation for medium and large sized organizations. Her diverse background in the staffing industry has positioned her to create holistic solutions for her clients. Her many roles include Recruitment Management, Business Development, Field Manager, and National Sales. For over 10 years, Andrea has created long lasting client relationships by helping companies in the changing world of work. Many of her solutions have included implementing successful Master Vendor programs, creative Permanent Placement initiatives, and Large Volume solutions for employers of choice.  As a result, Andrea is a three-time recipient of prestigious sales awards in the staffing industry.

Andrea holds an Honours B.A. in Media Communications from Brock University.

Canada’s Labour Force Survey, September 2017

Released at 8:30 a.m. Eastern time in The Daily, Friday, October 6, 2017

Employment was essentially unchanged in September (+10,000 or +0.1%). The unemployment rate remained at 6.2%, matching the low of October 2008. Gains in full-time employment (+112,000) in September were mostly offset by declines in part time (-102,000). In August, there was a decline in the number of people working full time and an increase in part time. In the 12 months to September, employment rose by 320,000 (+1.8%), spurred by gains in full-time employment (+289,000 or +2.0%). Over this period, the number of hours worked increased by 2.4%. Overall employment grew by 43,000 (+0.2%) in the third quarter, slower than the 0.6% growth rate in the second quarter and the 0.5% growth rate of the first quarter of 2017.

Chart 1 – Employment

Chart 2 – Unemployment Rate

Highlights
From August to September, employment increased for people aged 55 and older, while it fell among men aged 25 to 54. For the second consecutive month, Ontario was the lone province with a notable employment gain. There were employment declines in Manitoba and Prince Edward Island. More people worked in educational services as well as wholesale and retail trade in September, while employment fell in information, culture and recreation. There was additional employment in the public sector, while the number of private sector employees was little changed. At the same time, the number of self-employed workers held steady.

More People Aged 55 and Older Working
Employment rose by 25,000 in September for people aged 55 and older, mostly in full-time work. Their unemployment rate was little changed at 5.4%. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment for people aged 55 and older increased by 131,000 (+3.4%). Among workers aged 55 and older, about 8 in 10 are between the ages of 55 and 64. The estimated year-over-year employment growth rate (unadjusted for seasonality) for 55- to- 64-year-olds was 2.6% in September and their population increased by 2.0%. While population growth was similar for men and women in this age group, employment grew at a faster pace for women (+3.5%) than for men (+1.8%). In comparison, people aged 65 and older comprised a smaller share of older workers, but had the fastest year-over-year employment growth rate (unadjusted for seasonality) among the major demographic groups in September, rising 9.1% and outpacing their rate of population growth (+3.7%). Among this group of workers, employment grew at a faster pace for men (+12.4%) than for women (+4.5%). For more information about recent trends among older workers, see “The impact of aging on labour market participation rates.”

Employment Declines Among Men aged 25 to 54
For men aged 25 to 54, employment declined by 29,000 in September—all in part-time work. The unemployment rate for men in this age group rose by 0.4 percentage points to 5.9%. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment for men aged 25 to 54 increased by 72,000 (+1.2%). Among women aged 25 to 54, full-time employment increased by 39,000 in September, while part time fell by 26,000, leaving overall employment for this group little changed. Their unemployment rate was 5.2%. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment among core aged women rose by 102,000 (+1.8%).

Youth Unemployment Rate Down
Overall youth employment was little changed in September a 37,000 increase in full-time work was mostly offset by part-time losses. Employment for 15- to 24 year-olds was relatively unchanged compared with 12 months earlier. The unemployment rate for youth has been on a downward trend since the start of 2017 and fell 1.2 percentage points to 10.3% in September. This was the lowest rate since comparable data became available in 1976. See Chart 8 in the Labour Force Information \ publication. The decline in the youth unemployment rate in September was due to fewer youths in the labour market. The participation rate for this group fell 0.7 percentage points to 62.7% in the month. At the same time, their rate of full-time school attendance was 56.4%—the highest rate for any September since 2011. Increased school attendance is associated with delayed labour market participation. For more information about this long-term trend, see the Canada 150 box “Evolution of youth in the labour market.”

Provincial Employment
In Ontario, employment rose by 35,000 in September, the fourth overall gain in five months. An increase of 78,000 in full-time employment was partly offset by a decline of 43,000 in part-time work. The overall employment increase in September was driven by gains in wholesale and retail trade as well as educational services. The unemployment rate was little changed at 5.6% in September. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment in Ontario was up 170,000 (+2.4%). Employment in Manitoba declined by 5,500 in September, almost all in part-time work. This was the first notable overall employment decrease in the province since April 2016. Despite the monthly decline, employment in Manitoba has been on an upward trend since the end of 2016. In September, the unemployment rate increased by 0.6 percentage points to 5.5%. In September, employment decreased in Prince Edward Island (-700), the second decline in three months. Despite the recent decreases, employment in the province was up by 1,600 (+2.2%) compared with September 2016. The unemployment rate increased by 0.7 percentage points in September to 9.5%. Overall employment in Quebec was little changed for the third consecutive month. In September, a decline of 25,000 in part-time work was mostly offset by additional people working full time. In the 12 months to September, employment in the province rose by 54,000 (+1.3%), concentrated in full-time work. Over the same 12 month period, the unemployment rate fell by 0.9 percentage points to 6.0%.

Industry Perspective
The number of people working in educational services increased by 20,000 in September, primarily in Ontario and Quebec. Employment in the industry was similar to the level observed in September 2016. Employment in wholesale and retail trade rose by 17,000 in September, bringing gains to 99,000 (+3.6%) since September 2016. Employment in information, culture and recreation decreased by 24,000 in September. On a year-over-year basis, employment in the industry edged down by 20,000 (-2.5%). Public sector employment rose by 26,000 in September, while the number of private sector employees was little changed. Compared with 12 months earlier, the number of private sector employees increased by 162,000 (+1.4%) and public sector employment rose by 103,000 (+2.8%). The number of self-employed workers held steady in September, with year-over-year gains totaling 55,000 (+2.0%).

Quarterly Update for the Territories
The Labour Force Survey collects labour market data in the territories, produced in the form of three-month moving averages.In the third quarter of 2017, employment in Yukon was little changed compared with the second quarter, and the unemployment rate was relatively unchanged at 3.3%. In the Northwest Territories, employment in the third quarter was unchanged from the previous quarter. Over the same period, the unemployment rate was little changed at 7.0%. Employment in Nunavut held steady in the third quarter, while the unemployment rate was 14.9%.

Source: Statistics Canada

Automation Gives as it Takes

By: Federico Vione, CEO of Adecco General Staffing and Pontoon, North America, UK and Ireland

Improvements in technology are the catalyst for amazing innovation, but the level of fear over how recent improvements will affect the workplace has never been higher.

Fear is in the employee, who reads that half of all North American jobs are at risk of being replaced through automation and worries their job may soon be obsolete.

Fear is in the employer, who takes risks and incurs costs by embracing and implementing new technology.

And yes, fear is in the staffing industry, as agencies witness clients replace jobs with automation and robotics.

But where there is fear—where there is a challenge—there is opportunity.

We are in a period of transition, not extinction. Yes, automation is gradually reshaping the workforce, and today’s jobs will not be identical to tomorrow’s, but there will be jobs. And while it is the responsibility of employees and employers to prepare for that next chapter, we are here to help. Adecco is partnering with organizations across the globe on job training programs designed to prepare workers for this opportunity.

The University of Phoenix recently presented an ad that is a great example of promoting this opportunity, highlighting a modern “Rosie the Riveter” living through the pain of losing her job to automation. How does Rosie overcome this? Through education of course. Particularly by developing a new skill set and applying it to an industry which had not yet been affected by automation.

It is an uplifting story, but where do we go from here—where do you go? As an employee, identify if the work you do is likely to be impacted by automation. If so, be proactive and prepare yourself for the future. Just like Rosie, develop an array of skills that will make you an asset regardless of technology’s impact. As an employer, recognize the power you have to invest in your employees for the future of your company. Offer opportunities to build their resilience and grow skills that will be a necessity in your evolving workplace.

My colleague and Adecco Chief Marketing and Communications Officer Stephan Howeg recently published an article for the World Economic Forum titled “Why robots should inspire hope, not fear.” We share the same optimistic sentiment for the future and it trickles down throughout our organization.

We are just as confident in our ability to help prepare the workforce to work alongside new technology as we are proud to partner with governments, businesses and job seekers to fulfill that mission.

 

Federico is the Regional Head North America, UK & Ireland, Adecco and Pontoon.

Federico Vione joined Adecco in 1999 as Branch Manager and was subsequently appointed Manager of the Abruzzo-Molise area. In 2001, he became the National Key Account Manager for the Chemical and Pharma sector, and subsequently for the Large-Scale Trade sector. In 2002, he was appointed General Manager of the Professional Staffing business Ajilon S.r.l., and in 2004 he became General Manager of Ajilon Switzerland. In 2005, Federico Vione was appointed Project Leader Global Account Management Adecco Group and subsequently Head of Eastern Europe. In January 2009, he was appointed Country Manager Adecco Italy. Federico Vione was Vice President of Assolavoro (Assoziazione Nazionale delle Agenzie per il Lavoro), Italy, between 2010 and 2012.