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Posts from the ‘Employers’ Category

The Untapped Benefits of a Corporate Referral Program

Finding your next great hire in today’s competitive talent market can be time consuming and costly. With the plethora of sourcing tactics recruiters explore, sometimes the one staring us in the face is ignored — referrals from your existing employees.  A well managed corporate referral program can help you tap into a different talent pool and provide many other benefits.

Cost and time savings

Recruitment can add an impactful expense to a company’s bottom line.  Having employees advertise on your behalf will allow you to reduce your publishing and marketing costs and give you the gift of added time to focus on screening, interviewing and on-boarding. Plus, you can diminish your time-to-hire since you can cut out some recruitment steps. Granted, it does cost you, but after running a costs and benefit comparison, you may be pleasantly surprised.

Fit

No one knows or understands your company’s culture better than your existing employees. Employees are likely to recommend candidates with similar interests and values — augmenting your company’s culture and team chemistry. An employee who refers a friend of family member is an employee who is committed to your organization and will share their experiences which will allow your potential new hire to get a better grasp on the company culture and the position’s expectations.

Increased quality and engagement

Ever worry about how your newest hire will work out?  According to LinkedIn Corp.’s 2017 global recruiting trends report, 48% of employers feel employee referrals are the best source of quality hires. And, since your newest hire already knows at least one person in the organization, it has a direct impact on engagement and positively impacts the on-boarding process.

Retention tool

With networking sites such as LinkedIn increasingly affecting employee retention, , it’s vital to find creative ways to keep employees motivated.  A referral program allows employees to contribute to a company’s future and growth.  It also leaves them feeling prideful when their referral gets the job — making them feel trusted and valued.

With only 9% of employers allocating employee referral programs into their recruitment budgets, we can see that this is still an untapped resource in a competitive talent market. With all the benefits this program offers, now it is the time to act.  Looking for assistance to launch a corporate referral program? Contact Adecco today for tips to get you started!

Lēad Blog is part of Adecco and Roevin Canada. Hire your perfect team, or get more staffing advice from our experts.

 

Lessons Learned from Adecco Canada’s CEO for One Month Program

By: Olivia Poulin

Adecco Canada #CEO1Month Olivia Poulin shares her experience of the CEO for One Month program and what she learned about business, leadership and herself. 

Jumping into a role at the top of an industry that you’re unfamiliar with means you will experience and learn a lot along the way. I consider myself a very adaptable person who happily adjusts to new environments, tasks and people. So to me, the CEO for One Month program was an exciting adventure — a whole new life for one month! I moved from Niagara Falls to my own apartment in downtown Toronto, took an Uber for the first time and walked to the store to buy groceries. I shadowed Adecco Canada CEO Gilbert Boileau and got to meet CEOs, directors, managers, recruiters and sales reps. I attended client meetings and dinners, visited branches and toured giant warehouses. I flew to Montreal and Ottawa for day trips, spent time shadowing recruiters and had lunch with new colleagues. I had many life chats and vibrant conversations with Gilbert as well as a variety of other managers. I spoke with candidates and associates about their experiences with Adecco and put together an hour and a half presentation for our senior leadership team for my last day. Needless to say, it was a lot to take in. In the rest of this blog, I’ve gathered some of my thoughts on my month at Adecco Canada so that others can learn from my experiences.

WHAT I LEARNED ABOUT BUSINESS & BEING A CEO

Meetings, meetings and more meetings

During my first week with Adecco Canada, I jumped right into the work of the CEO by joining Gilbert and VP of Finance Doug Hamlyn in calling all Adecco branches in Canada. Each meeting was scheduled for 30 minutes. That’s 20 HOURS on the phone. I watched as both Doug and Gilbert were attentive and interested in what branch managers wanted to share, from the first call down to the last, despite being exhausted.

Throughout the rest of the month, I joined Gilbert for national sales meetings, branch meetings, client lunches/dinners, weekly one-on-ones, meetings with people he reports to at US headquarters and many more. It was exciting to meet in person some of the voices I had spoken to on the phone my first week! Most importantly, these meetings helped me soak up as much as possible about an industry that was brand new to me. And I had a lot to figure out. There was rarely much time in between meetings, so I sorted out many answers to my questions by asking colleagues, doing research and taking advantage of travel time to talk with Gilbert.

These meetings introduced me to a fundamental truth about leadership: being a CEO really does mean being in meetings! But it’s more than that — it’s about managing people and teams so that you can reach shared success as a company.

The value of teamwork

Yes, we all know teamwork is important, but during my time with Adecco I realized just how much each person relies on their team. Being the CEO doesn’t mean you are a lone wolf and can make whatever decision you want. If anything, it means that you’re MORE responsible to the people around you — both above and below. After all, there is no CEO position without dozens or hundreds of positions supporting it. By participating in these meetings and learning more about Gilbert’s role at Adecco Canada, I came away even more committed to service leadership.

Gilbert’s job is to find ways to support the teams of people that make up the company for better business. I learned this because I spent time with the senior leadership team at headquarters in Toronto, attended an all-day branch manager meeting in Quebec and spent time at branches with recruiters, giving me an all-around view of each level of the organization. I saw so many positive work environments where people are happy, engaged and supportive of their teams, I’m not surprised that Adecco is on the Great Place to Work list for the second year in a row!

WHAT I LEARNED ABOUT LEADERSHIP

Knowing your stuff

As a leader and CEO, more often than not, you need to know your stuff. My respect for Gilbert increased every time I heard him speak credibly about the specifics of what is going on in a branch, with a VMS tool or in the recruitment industry. There was so much to know for more than 40 branches across Canada and countless clients, associates and employees, but he was on top of it as much as he possibly could be. People can often tell when you are making up information to sound smart or in-the-know, and as a leader, that would damage your credibility. When you don’t know, it’s equally important to own up to it and ask for the information you need. I saw examples of this form of leadership not just with Gilbert, but with recruiters, branch managers and regional vice-presidents who reached out for help in order to inform their decisions.

WHAT I LEARNED ABOUT ADECCO

The staffing industry

For a long time, I assumed that everyone with a job works for the company whose name is on their shirt. I never stopped to consider that any (or all) of the recruitment process for some staff could have been outsourced. Adecco does everything from posting job descriptions, accepting applications, conducting interviews, on-boarding new staff, supervising at work sites and more to help their associates find work at other companies. These temporary employees work AT and FOR a specific company, but are considered Adecco employees (on Adecco’s payroll, earning Adecco benefits). This makes life easier for companies who need to hire new staff for a short-term contract or for companies that hire hundreds of new staff at a time for peak seasons. Temporary jobs are an awesome way to get experience in a variety of roles, learn about different companies and earn great pay.

Adecco changes lives

I studied the candidate journey during my CEO for One Month experience. Throughout the process, I got to hear some incredibly heartwarming stories about how Adecco has changed people’s lives. Whether it’s new graduates, adults re-entering the workforce or immigrants who have recently arrived in Canada — Adecco helps anyone and everyone find meaningful work. Many of these stories involved individuals struggling to find a job and provide for themselves or their families and approaching Adecco for help.

People are especially shocked to find out that Adecco’s job search help services are free for their candidates. Adecco has relationships with thousands of employers who are looking for great staff to join their teams; by bridging this gap, Adecco helps thousands of people find work every week. For many, not having a job is just not an option and life is scary without stable income. I was privileged to hear success stories from many associates that brought a smile to my face and put into perspective the amazing work that Adecco does.

Believing in the next generation

I think my participation in the CEO for One Month Program with Adecco says it all: they believe in the next generation. Providing the privilege to join a CEO in their day-to-day business operations is a huge demonstration of trust from Adecco and I am so grateful for their transparency and willingness to guide me as I learned. Not only do they believe in me, they believe in the entire next generation and are eager to tap into their talent and perspectives. It’s up to us to show them that their trust is in the right place by working hard, being responsible and living with passion!

WHAT I LEARNED ABOUT MYSELF

Social media

When I sat in on the branch review phone calls my first day, I kept my phone out to Google terms I was unfamiliar with and research clients on the spot, so that I could better understand what we were talking about. When I was not using the Internet to keep up with the conversation, my phone sat on the table face up and was continually lighting up with notifications from social media. Snapchat, Instagram, Facebook… all of it. Though I wasn’t checking these notifications, I was still distracted by them and bothered that they were interrupting my participation in our phone calls. That night I went home and shut off all social media notifications. I immediately noticed that my productivity increased, I was interrupted less throughout the day and I felt more in control of my social media use. Out of sight, out of mind. I have kept these notifications turned off since returning home because I enjoy feeling more connected in the moment and have decided to only check my notifications when I feel like it or when I am alone.

Bedtime

As a self-proclaimed night owl, my best hours of productivity have been between 11 p.m. and 2 a.m. for the last four years of university. My schedule never had me spending more than a few hours in one place between classes, running my business, church responsibilities, hobbies, sports, a social life, family time etc. Running on 5 hours of sleep was tough, but not impossible. During my time in Toronto, though, I was focused on just one thing for hours at a time: Adecco. I embarrassingly look back on a few moments when I was so exhausted it was tough for me to keep my eyes open and head from hurting in meetings. I realized my sleep schedule needed some serious adjustment and I vowed to begin going to bed at midnight. In the past, midnight meant I was just getting into my groove and had two productive hours ahead of me. Now? It means bedtime. Since returning home from my Adecco adventures, I haven’t consistently gone to bed at midnight, but I have definitely improved from my once-standard 2 a.m. bedtime. I’ve realized how much more sustainable it is for my health and work. To bring my best self to work, I need a proper sleep the night before.

Juggling priorities & hard work

I’ve always had a “get-it-done” attitude, regardless of the circumstances. I truly believe that there is always a way. During the month of June, not only did I have to balance my CEO schedule and deliverables, but I was also completing reports and projects for Adecco Global, taking a full credit spring class, running my business from afar and tending to regional responsibilities with my church, all while attempting to get sleep, exercise and stay in touch with my friends and family. My “get-it-done” attitude was tested, but deciding what my priorities were, setting expectations for myself and really committing to my work helped me accomplish all that I needed to. Parkinson’s law is the adage that “work expands so as to fill the time available for its completion” and I’ve experienced the negative consequences of this many times in my life as I rushed to meet deadlines that were set days or weeks in advance. My experience with Adecco forced me to dedicate concentrated blocks of time to completing tasks to ensure they didn’t grow to be impossible to handle amid all of my other responsibilities.

Throughout my time at Adecco, I have been challenged, but I also learned, worked hard and had lots of fun. I’m grateful for the trust that I felt and the relationships I developed along the way. Gilbert was a great mentor to me and was an example of how to be a successful CEO and lead change in an organization. I highly recommend the CEO for One Month program to any budding business minds or eager and curious learners.

Thank you to everyone for supporting this program and letting me become part of the Adecco family! Please follow my social accounts if you haven’t already … I am still completing projects to compete for a spot at the Global Bootcamp and would love your support!
I can be found on Instagram (@poulin09) and Twitter (@oliviapoulin). Make sure to use #CEO1Month.

Want to learn more about Olivia and #CEO1Month? Read her previous blog Interested in Adecco Canada’s CEO for One Month Program in 2019? Here’s what you need to know!


 To view more of our blogs and articles, visit our resources page on our website.

Staffing Trends

Here at Adecco, we are focused on staying up-to-date with evolving staffing trends. Heavily influenced by technology and cost-saving efforts, the recruitment industry is always changing. To help you navigate this environment, keep reading for a roundup of some recent and relevant staffing trends in Canada.

Employer Branding

With increased competition to attract and retain top talent, employer branding can take companies to the next level. According to a recent LinkedIn report, talent acquisition leaders broadly agree that employer branding is an important factor in their recruitment efforts.[i] And because candidates can afford to be selective about which companies they choose, company culture messaging is essential in capturing a potential candidate’s attention.

Social Recruiting

Employers are leveraging online professional networking sites like LinkedIn to appeal to their target candidate demographics. These sites facilitate online recruitment efforts and provide effective ways of engaging potential candidates to evaluate fit prior to the interview stage. Social networking sites have also proven to be a successful component of an employer branding strategy, giving users the opportunity to market the organization, as well as open positions to candidate pools.

Candidate Screening

With evolving technology, employers can now rely on automated screening methods to facilitate the hiring process. Algorithms and artificial intelligence help recruiters filter candidates efficiently, ensuring that every candidate being interviewed is equipped with the skills required for the role. These tools allow employers to focus on the best fit for their corporate culture, while saving them the time and energy of manually sifting through numerous applications.

On-Demand Workforce

The growing trend of an on-demand workforce enables employers to scale their workforce up or down to flexibly meet the demands of short-term requirements or rapid business shifts. It’s expected that by 2020 almost half of Canada’s working population will be self-employed.[ii] This model offers benefits to both employees, who have the flexibility to set their own schedule and rates, and employers, who can save the added cost of benefits, paid vacation, pension and more.

Recruitment Process Outsourcing

Don’t have the resources to recruit internally? You’re not alone! Many companies with a small or non-existent HR department rely on outsourcing their recruitment process. This could be in the form of consulting a headhunter to tackle your hiring needs, or working with an employment agency to assist in recruitment efforts big or small.

Keeping up-to-date with current staffing trends can help ensure your recruitment efforts yield optimal results. At Adecco, recruiting is our business.  We can help you respond to these trends or fill those challenging roles, so contact your local Adecco branch today and speak to a qualified Recruitment Consultant.

To view more of our blogs and articles, visit our Employer resources page on our website.


[i] U.S and Canada Recruiting Trends 2017 – What you need to know about the state of talent acquisition. LinkedIn https://business.linkedin.com/content/dam/me/business/en-us/talent-solutions/resources/pdfs/us-and-canada-recruiting-trends-2017.pdf

[ii] Intuit says 45% of Canadians will be self-employed by 2020 releases new app to help with finances. Financial Post http://business.financialpost.com/technology/personal-tech/intuit-says-45-of-canadians-will-be-self-employed-by-2020-releases-new-app-to-help-with-finances

 

Including Inclusion

By: Megan Wickens

It’s easy to say that there’s a difference between diversity and inclusion, but drawing out the differences between these two goals is not as easy. In this guest post, Megan Wickens, head of our Alberta trades division and member of our Canadian Diversity and Inclusion Committee, looks at how inclusion policies are the next frontier in the corporate world.

There’s no doubt that we need to focus on building a culture of inclusion in the workplace and in the world.

What is diversity in the workplace? The dictionary defines diversity as the condition of having or being composed of differing elements: variety. And when we talk about diversity in the workplace, we’re usually referring to these 4 elements: ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation and age.

While diversity is buried in the corporate policy of most companies, I would argue that it’s worth so much more than that. Our goal should be to create a culture of diverse talent. Instead of thinking of it as an obligation to meet diversity targets, to check off an item on a checklist, we need to reframe diversity so that it considers the inclusion of diverse viewpoints.

It doesn’t have to be hard. We do it all the time in business: diversifying portfolios and product mixes to stay ahead of the curve. Now apply the same to people – why wouldn’t we want to include diverse viewpoints from people who add value to our business and our lives? Inclusive policies can help us get there!

A little bit about me

I am on the Canadian Diversity & Inclusion Committee with the largest HR staffing company in the world and I head up the trades division in Alberta for our engineering brand (an industry that is predominantly male). I am married and do not have kids (none on two legs anyways #dogmom). I am considered a millennial, but I’ve spent almost a decade in the technical recruitment industry and another handful of years in the customer service industry.

I bring these things up because I want you to know where I’m coming from. In my career, I have not felt that my age (or lack of age) played a role in my ability to be hired. I have not felt that I was asked to do more work because I don’t have kids that depend on me. I have not felt that my opinion wasn’t valued or that I wasn’t being included. I’ve been lucky.

The truth is that many people do feel this way. And it can be hard to accept that we aren’t all inclusive leaders. So, thinking about the way that we are (and are not) inclusive can be a valuable exercise for all of us.

Focus on inclusion

My husband sent me a video created by Accenture that emphasizes the sometimes unconscious exclusion of people that can happen even when diversity targets have been met. The video highlights the ways that our differences can inform how we interact with each other, which can sometimes create uncomfortable (or even untenable) work experiences that prevent us from reaching our full potential.

The video raises questions about the ways that we treat our colleagues: what informs our expectations? How do we articulate these expectations? It ends with a call to recognize these biases and embrace change for the better – change that comes from refocusing on inclusion.

I urge you to watch the video at the end of this blog, sit back, think hard and decide — am I an inclusive leader? As leaders, we constantly need to be self-aware and empathetic; understanding our audience and showing emotional intelligence is an important part of the job. So, it’s important that we ask ourselves these important questions: Do we really know our teams? How can we know them better? How can we get the best out of everyone and not just from those who rise to the top out of sheer determination?

On our teams, everyone should be a top performer. Everyone should be valued and recognized for adding value. It’s clear that we’re better off when our diverse teams are able to contribute to our success, so let’s focus on building a culture of inclusion in the workplace and the world.


To view more of our blogs and articles, visit our Employer resources page on our website.

Why an Internship Program?

Internships are more than a mandatory student requirement and experience on a resume. A well-managed internship program can bring significant benefits to an organization.  Here’s how your organization can reap the rewards.

  1. Fresh Perspectives

Student interns bring with them fresh ideas and perspectives that can have a great impact on a business. Recent grads are generally tech savvy and fluent with social media platforms — positioning them well to impact marketing strategies! To tap into your intern’s ideas and creativity, create an environment in which they feel comfortable so they are at ease to participate in meetings and brainstorm sessions.

  1. Brand Recognition

Good news travels fast.  Internship programs show potential job seekers and existing employees that your company believes in employee development.  These programs also shed light on positive corporate values to existing and new clients.  Adopting such a program and making it a positive experience, means that people will talk about your company to their network — setting your brand apart from other companies competing for similar talent and clients.

  1. Increased Productivity

Internship programs are a cost-effective solution to providing extra support staff members sometimes need. Interns lend great support with administrative tasks and other entry level projects, allowing employees to focus on higher level business tasks. This prevents existing employees from becoming over burdened with a high workload — while ultimately increasing productivity.

  1. Recruitment Tool

Internships are a great way to evaluate a potential candidate without the commitment of hiring them permanently. This year-round recruitment tool creates larger pools of talent to pull from, with workforce ready candidates. Should you decide to hire an intern, the result is a new employee who is fully trained and understands your business — allowing you to save costs on recruitment and training!

  1. Giving back to the community

Developing a well-managed internship is a great way to give back to the community and demonstrate that you value their support of your business. Not to mention, internship programs increase employment levels, enhance the local workforce and economy, and, assist graduates in developing professional skills. What better way to solidify a positive corporate culture that encapsulates social responsibility?

Need help implementing an internship program for your company? Contact Adecco Canada for resources and assistance, and start reaping the benefits of a well-managed internship today!


To view more of our blogs and articles, visit our Employer resources page on our website.

Can I do more?

By:  Camillo Zacchia, Ph.D. – Psychologist

In this guest post, clinical psychologist Dr. Camillo Zacchia looks at the tendency to question whether we’re doing enough. He looks at the personality types that can get derailed by these feelings of inadequacy and offers a way forward when confronted by the sense that you’re not doing enough. Read on for Dr. Zacchia’s article on the art of good enough.

Can I do more? This question is a trap if I ever heard one.

Can I do more to help my parents? Can I do a better job on this assignment? Can I eat better? These types of questions are endless and the only answer to them is yes. The simple fact is we can always do more or do better. This means that in order to stop working on something, we have to accept this fact and just “be OK” with it. In other words, we have to accept that good enough is good enough.

But what happens to people who can’t be satisfied with good enough? Those who are unable to accept this option are going to be in trouble. The question of “can I do more?” will leave them with only two other options. The first is to be disappointed with not doing their best and the second is to try harder and keep going. But if they try harder, they are still left with the question of “can I do more?” and they’re right back to the same two options of trying harder or being disappointed. There is no alternative. For them, all roads eventually lead to disappointment.

Of course, this isn’t a big issue for most of us. The majority of people can live with good enough. They acknowledge that they can do better — after all, nobody’s perfect — but can nevertheless be satisfied with what they’ve done. No disappointment for these people. But there are others who have a much harder time letting go, and for them the question of “can I do more?” will cause significant problems and often lead to feelings of burnout. There are two groups of people who have particular difficulty letting things stand.

The perfectionists
Some people just can’t seem to be happy until things are just right: a job that seems well done still needs refining, a good meal still needs a little something, nothing feels quite good enough. These people can sometimes be seen as perfectionists, or as picky. There is no denying the fact that their work is generally very high quality. The only problem is that they are rarely satisfied with it, even if everyone else around them is.

The guilt-ridden
There is another group of individuals who are governed by excessive guilt. They are generally seen as people pleasers and are constantly doing for others. This can include trying to please bosses, coworkers, friends or members of the family. Many of them may have grown up in a home with a parent who was difficult to please or who was needy, dependent and required lots of attention and help. Since everyone around them always has needs, the guilt-ridden can’t stop. To do so would mean to disappoint others and it just isn’t in their nature to let others down.

For the perfectionist and guilt-ridden people, the question of “can I do more?” is a trap. The answer will always be yes. As a result, they will keep pushing for more and will almost always overdo things, potentially leading to burnout or complete avoidance of people or responsibilities. It’s just too much work, so they often run away and simply stop trying.

This is the self-fulfilling prophecy we often see in such people. Even though they always do very well in both quantity and quality, at some point they know it won’t be good enough so they just give up. Ironically, it confirms their belief that they aren’t “good enough” because now they really are getting nothing done.

For those who aren’t very good at letting go, the only way around this bottomless pit of disappointment is to be aware of the trap that comes with the question “can I do more?” A far more functional question is “did I do a lot?” Just look at how your raw performance numbers or indicators stack up to others in your position. Do you treat as many dossiers as your co-workers? Do you do as much for your parents as your siblings? The answer to “did I do a lot?’ is usually also yes. But at least answering yes to this question does not require you to do more.

When we know in our logical minds that we did a lot — probably more than most others would — then we have to force ourselves to stop. This may make us uncomfortable at first but like all emotions, they fade over time. If we give in to these feelings, they will strengthen. If we don’t act on them, and allow them to dissipate naturally, they will get weaker and weaker over time.

The idea of things being good but not quite good enough may make you feel uncomfortable at first but by not giving in to your urges to do more, you will eventually feel that things really are just that…good enough.

To view more of our blogs and articles, visit our Employment resources page on our website.


Dr. Zacchia[1] is a clinical psychologist specializing in the treatment of anxiety disorders, depression and interpersonal problems. He blogs at Psychospeak with Dr. Z[2] and the Huffington Post Canada: The Ilk of Humankind[3].

Editor’s Note: A previous version of this post appeared on Psychospeak with Dr. Z.[4] It has been updated to provide additional details.

Stay tuned for more from Dr. Zacchia as he looks at mental health in the workplace.

[1] www.drzacchia.com

[2] http://blog.douglas.qc.ca/psychospeak/

[3] https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/author/camillo-zacchia-phd/

[4] http://blog.douglas.qc.ca/psychospeak/2015/07/07/can-i-do-more/