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Posts from the ‘Employers’ Category

Legalizing Cannabis: What We Know So Far

After years of prohibition, cannabis is finally set to be legalized in Canada in the summer of 2018. Here’s our primer on what we know so far about the process of legalizing cannabis in Canada. 

Aiming to reduce illegal distribution and underage consumption, Canada is set to legalize the recreational consumption of cannabis by the end of the summer. As the final vote on Bill C-45 is set for June 7, 2018, Canadians have much to consider in a short amount of time.[i] From provincial policies, legal implications and regional differences, the legalization of cannabis is sure to affect the whole country.

Shaping policies

As Bill C-45 is set to legalize recreational use of cannabis in Canada, provinces and territories have an opportunity to shape policies to best accommodate users while managing negative responses and perceptions. With perceptions of cannabis as diverse as the people in Canada, creating policies for the legalization of cannabis use can be challenging. It will take input from government officials, health professionals and law enforcement to design policies to limit substance abuse while keeping cannabis out of the hands of minors.

Legal implications

With the goal of stamping out the cannabis black market in Canada, legalization sets to regulate distribution of the substance. However, though legalization intends to limit illegal sales and distribution, there are other legal concerns that arise from Bill-C45, including operating a motor vehicle while impaired. With no current consensus on how long it takes to be able to drive safely after consuming cannabis,[ii] and no 100% effective way to test for cannabis impairment in drivers, there are still many regulatory questions that have yet to be settled.

Regional outlook

Although the production of cannabis will be regulated by the federal government, individual provinces are responsible for determining age restrictions and seller regulations. Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick will rely on the provincial government for sales, while provinces including Alberta and Manitoba will provide licenses for private retailers.[iii] Provinces and territories will also control limitations for growing cannabis in personal residences, where cannabis can be consumed and personal possession limits.[iv]

Myth vs. reality

Though some may believe that there will be consumption of cannabis throughout the streets of major cities across Canada come summer 2018, this is not the case. Much like regulations surrounding alcohol, there will be rules and regulations not only surrounding sales of the substance, but also the end user’s consumption habits. Legalization is designed to better regulate the distribution of cannabis, keeping the substance away from minors and decreasing organized crimes.

Though Bill C-45 has its critics, with the co-operation of policymakers and law enforcement, policies can be formed with the best interest of the Canadian public in mind.

Join us as we examine the legalization of cannabis in Canada in our blog series examining organizational policy and job opportunities.

To view more of our blogs and articles, visit our Employer resources page on our website.


[i] https://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/pot-could-be-legal-june-7-but-sales-delayed-until-at-least-august-senator-1.3808111

[ii] https://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-drive/culture/commuting/how-much-marijuana-can-i-have-and-still-be-safe-to-drive/article27897258/

[iii] https://globalnews.ca/news/3867467/marijuana-legalization-canada-progress/

[iv] http://www.opha.on.ca/getmedia/6b05a6bc-bac2-4c92-af18-62b91a003b1b/The-Public-Health-Implications-of-the-Legalization-of-Recreational-Cannabis.pdf.aspx?ext=.pdf

 

Cannabis – A Shift in Perception

With the legalization of cannabis only a couple months away, many Canadians still have reservations about its accessibility and the effects its consumption will have on the workplace.

In the past few years, Canadians have experienced a growing reliance on the use of cannabis for medicinal purposes. Its usage for treatment of pain, relief of cancer symptoms, and epilepsy has paved the way for the legalization of cannabis and has slowly altered the way the general public perceives the historically illegal substance.

Though studies show the majority of Canadians agree with its legalization[i], recreational use of cannabis still has its critics. Here, we examine three areas of concern related to the legalization of cannabis and its impact on the workplace.

Managing a “high” workplace

Though employers must accommodate employees who have prescriptions to use medicinal marijuana, the imminent legalization of cannabis brings up concerns about controlling recreational use at work. Employers have the right to set limitations on the consumption of cannabis on work property in line with a drug-free workplace policy. The policy should outline disciplinary action for offenders in attempts to prohibit impairment on the job.

Managing the credibility of employers and employees

Regardless of the pending legalization, or the use of cannabis for medicinal purposes, there is still a stigma surrounding the consumption of cannabis. Once legal, employers should make attempts to change policy vocabulary. For example,  the substance should no longer be defined as “illegal” to recognize the legislated reality and to help shift perceptions away from traditionally negative views of recreational consumption by employees.

Negotiating differences in perceptions across demographics

Cannabis purchases vary based on demographics, with 25-44 year-olds accounting for 40% of the purchases while the 45-64 year-old group accounts for only 23% of cannabis purchases.[ii] Though this number has grown, the large gap in consumption between the age groups indicates greater acceptance towards cannabis from the 25-44 year-old demographic. By instituting a drug-free workplace policy, employers can accommodate the varying perceptions of cannabis across your workforce.

Regardless of the varied perceptions, the legalization of cannabis is imminent, and with it, proposed preventative measures instituting proper control of substance distribution and consumption will be introduced that seek to allay negative perceptions of the legalization of cannabis. Employers can also respond to shifting perceptions with clear workplace policies for their employees.

To view more of our blogs and articles, visit our Employer resources page on our website.


For more information on how this budding industry will affect organizational policy and job opportunities, stay tuned to our series examining the legalization of cannabis in Canada.

[i] http://www.macleans.ca/society/majority-of-canadians-support-marijuana-legalization-says-survey/

[ii] http://business.financialpost.com/commodities/agriculture/canadians-spent-c5-7-billion-on-cannabis-in-2017-statistics-canada

 

Current Unemployment Rate in Canada

Canada’s job market continues to impress. In 2017, Canada’s unemployment rate dropped to its lowest level in 40 years.  With the 13th consecutive month of positive job gains, 2018 is looking promising.

Overview

The Canadian employment rate is off to a strong outset for 2018 given the substantial performance in the last 12 months. The unemployment rate dropped at the end of 2017 to its lowest levels in 40 years, with the Canadian economy generating 423,000 new positions in 2017 — including 394,000 full-time jobs. The year concluded with a drop in the unemployment rate by 1.2 percentage points to 5.7% — the lowest rate since comparable recorded data became available in 1976. Overall employment rose by 2.3%, making it the fastest employment growth in 15 years.

Demographic Changes

The Canadian employment rate saw gains in 2017 across all demographics by varying amounts. The 15 to 24 year old demographic employment rate rose by 1.4% (up 34,000 positions), while the groups’ population declined by 0.5%, resulting in an overall employment rate increase to 57.2%. The 25 to 54 year old demographic experienced an employment rate increase by 1.6%, up 186,000 positions.

The employment rate for men and women over the age of 55 increased by a substantial 5.3% in 2017 — totaling 203,000 positions — finally exceeding the rate of population growth for this demographic. These workers largely fall into the 55 to 64 year-old age range.

Provincial Growth

The Canadian employment rate continued to climb through the end of 2017. Quebec and Alberta led employment growth in December 2017, with smaller gains observed in Nova Scotia, Saskatchewan, New Brunswick and PEI. In Quebec, employment continued to grow in December 2017 for a third consecutive month, up to 27,000, ending the year with a record-low unemployment rate of 4.9%. Alberta, despite its recent oil-led recession, closely followed Quebec’s downward unemployment trend with employment increasing by 26,000 — a majority being full-time positions, resulting in the highest employment performance since 2014. Continuing with positive trends, Ontario remained steady after a substantial increase in November of 44,000 [i] and December saw employment rise in the following provinces:

  • Nova Scotia by 5,900
  • Saskatchewan by 5,000
  • New Brunswick by 4,200

Prince Edward Island by 900

Employment by Industry

Transportation and warehousing led employment growth in the service-producing sector — up 6.3% or 57,000 positions. The service sector saw additional gains in the finance, insurance, real estate, rental and leasing, (up 4.6% or 53,000), and professional, scientific and technical services (up 3.8% or 53,000). These industry gains closed 2017 with an increase in employment in the service-producing sector by 2.0%.

The goods-producing sector experienced employment gains in manufacturing (up 5.1% or 86,000), natural resources (up 4.6% or 15,000) and construction (3.6% or 51,000).  After recording losses in 2015 and 2016, natural resources bounced back recording an increase of 15,000 positions in 2017. The goods-producing sector finished the year with an overall increase in employment of 3.5%.

With the continuous promise to increase minimum wage in provinces across Canada, and the changing landscape of where and how we work, we can expect to see implications affect the 2018 unemployment rate. However, the last 12 months of positive job creation signals a mending Canadian economy that continues to gain steam.

For more articles, visit our Employer resources page on our website.


[i] http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/171201/dq171201a-eng.htm

Remaining Statistics from StatCan:

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/180105/dq180105a-eng.htm

 

 

Attracting and Retaining Your Talent

It’s no secret that the key to any company’s success lies in the ability to maintain a committed and motivated workforce. With professional networking sites, such as LinkedIn, becoming the norm in recruitment strategies, it has become increasingly challenging to avoid turnover.

Here are some tips to help you in the areas of employee attraction and retention.

Attracting Talent

Fair compensation

One of the biggest mistakes an employer can make is to base their position’s salary on budget —not market rates. To ensure your pay rates are competitive within your market, consult Adecco’s 2018 Compensation Guide. Don’t forget competitive compensation encompasses more than just the base salary! Make sure you offer a flexible benefits program so your employees can pick a plan that satisfies their individual needs.

Referral bonuses

Good people know good people! Why not capitalize on that? To supplement your recruitment efforts, try offering the incentive of a referral bonus to . A gift card, paid vacation day or cash bonus encourages employees to refer only the best candidates.

Your online reputation

With online search engines leaving little to the imagination, building a good company reputation is essential for your hiring process. Bad reviews, scandals, news stories and complaints can scare off that potential candidate before they even step foot through your door. Make sure you monitor your online reputation to ensure your talent pool isn’t being influenced.

Clear and Concise Job Descriptions

Making sure you have job specs in place that carefully detail the role and responsibilities of the position ensures that the potential candidate understands the role’s expectations from the get go. A detailed job description also allows the candidate you’re interviewing gage what they will be accountable for delivering and what how their performance will be measured.

Retaining your staff

Job Training

There is nothing more challenging than being thrown into a new position with little to no training. Regardless of what’s listed on that new employee’s resume, a new company brings new technologies, software and office practices. Providing a thorough training session for new hires will help instill confidence in their new role. Pressed on time? Consider curating a department manual. This can be used as a supplementary training aid, as well as a reference guide of expectations and proper procedures for the entire department.

Positive Work Culture

Spending 40-hours a week at work is taxing on even the best employee. Ensuring your employees have a great atmosphere to spend most of their waking hours demonstrates just how much you value them. Celebrating holidays, organizing luncheons and implementing casual dress days are just a few ways to develop a culture that keeps employees motivated.

Employee incentive programs

Incentive programs keep employees motivated. A common incentive is the profit sharing program.  This incentive allows an employee to be rewarded based on the company’s success. Working within a budget? Don’t be afraid to get creative! Try offering a paid lunch, a gift card for coffee or to the movies, and watch employee productivity increase!

Feedback

Every employee appreciates constructive feedback. Not only does it open a dialogue, it also confirms the employee’s value. Make sure to reward a job well done with special acknowledgement to not only keep employees motivated, but also boost job performance.

Development and growth opportunities

Professional development is a driving motivator to many employees. They want to be assured they are in a position that’s linked to growth opportunities. To assist employees with their professional development, hold annual or bi-annual reviews, set realistic career goals and create action plans. Finally, make sure employees are aware when an internal position is available to give them an opportunity to apply.

Work/Life balance

At the end of the day, work family is not real family. Employees have a life outside of their cubicle and it’s important to consider what you can do to better that life. With modern technology, it is becoming increasingly common for companies to implement flex hours, or virtual work options. These options give employees the flexibility to manage their personal life, while maintaining productivity in their professional one.

Looking to increase your success at attracting and retaining talent? Adecco is here to help! Contact your local Adecco Branch to speak with one of our specialized recruitment consultants!

For more information and articles, visit our Employer resources page on our webs

5 Must-Ask Behavioural Interview Questions

During the hiring process, the interview gives you the chance to go beyond the hard skills presented in a candidate’s resume and assess soft skills, professionalism and the potential fit with your company. While a resume identifies capable candidates, the interview is where you find the right candidate.

To make the most of the interview process, we offer the following five behavioural interview questions to help direct your conversation with interviewees to better evaluate their fit with your company culture.

  1. Describe a time you were faced with a stressful situation. How did you handle it?

Use this question to evaluate how a candidate works under pressure. Given that your candidate will be in a new work environment that can bring new challenges and stressors, you want to ensure that you select a someone capable of maintaining productivity under stress.

  1. Tell me about a time when you went above and beyond the call of duty to get the job done.

This question assesses work ethic. The way a candidate answers gives you insight into their approach to completing tasks and their willingness to take responsibility for their work.

  1. Give me an example of a time when you showed initiative and took the lead.

Hiring employees with strong leadership skills can help boost your office’s productivity. Use this question to select a candidate with strong leadership skills.

  1. What are three tactics you have used to address conflict within the office?

Asking this question encourages a candidate to articulate their de-escalating behaviours. While conflict may be inevitable when you spend a significant amount of time with work colleagues, this question helps you identify candidates who are more likely to productively resolve conflicts.

  1. Give an example of when you had to make a split-second decision. What decision did you make?

When entrusting daily operations of your business to an individual, it is imperative that they can make appropriate quick decisions. To ensure the candidate can make quick decisions in the best interest of your company, consider asking the above question.

These five questions help draw out examples of candidates’ work behaviours, allowing you to evaluate their compatibility with the open position and, ultimately, your corporate culture. While the interview process can be difficult, behavioural questions that help you target and identify desirable traits can help select the optimal candidate for your role.

Looking to improve your new-hire turnover? Adecco has you covered. With trained recruitment professionals and behavioural and skill set testing, we ensure that every candidate is pre-screened to meet your required qualifications before they even step through your door! Contact your local Adecco branch today to learn how we can assist with your hiring needs.

For more information and articles, visit our Employer resources page on our website.

10 Tips to Leverage Social Media in Your Recruitment Strategy

To source talent, recruiters typically put themselves in the shoes of the ideal candidate and wonder, where would that candidate go? What are their interests? What literature do they read? How do they stay informed? Being able to answer these questions used to mean that a sourcing tactic could be put into motion to target a specific pool of candidates, be it, newspapers, flyers in coffee shops, radio ads, etc. However, the social media era has changed the game. 2 in 3 people Canadians use social media platforms daily.  Incorporating social media into your recruitment strategy to draw talent from this platform has never been more important.

Here’s 10 tips to help you make the most of your social media recruitment strategy.

  1. Build and share a corporate culture

Before using social media in your recruitment strategy, you need to build an online corporate presence to promote your brand and culture. Share posts that reflect company values, highlight company success stories, and, share event information, testimonials, etc. This will help promote your corporate culture and attract potential employees.

  1. Diversify your corporate social media platforms

Solely having a company Facebook profile doesn’t cut it anymore. Make sure your social media platforms are as diverse as your potential employees! Consider other social platforms like Instagram, Pinterest, Twitter and LinkedIn to reach a broader audience.

  1. Determine the appropriate platform for your position

You would not recruit for an IT professional on Instagram, much like you wouldn’t recruit for a shipper/receiver on LinkedIn. Remember to wear the shoes of that ideal candidate, and use the appropriate mediums to recruit your target demographic. This ensures your efforts yield optimal results.

  1. Engage employees

Good people know good people, right? Well they often follow them on social media too! Find ways to involve colleagues in promoting your brand on social media. Colleagues sharing job postings online helps increase attention for your role, facilitating your recruitment efforts.

  1. Monitor your competition

The transparency of social media is a fantastic way to stay on top of your competition. Check out their recruitment tactics. Look at what they’re offering, and try to differentiate yourself. Don’t forget to promote your corporate culture as it’s your key competitive advantage.

  1. Tap into LinkedIn’s recruitment tools

For professional roles, LinkedIn is where you want to start. To capitalize on the recruiting benefits LinkedIn offers, consider investing in a Recruiter profile. This gives you access to tools that will search and filter candidates by job title, location, skills and several other factors. You can also contact potential applicants individually or in batches, and, track applicants to facilitate recruitment. Also, don’t forget about your own connections. Post the job on your corporate LinkedIn page, and your own. Your personal LinkedIn network may just yield the perfect candidate!

  1. Facebook’s audience insights tool

Facebook audience insights is a great tool to help narrow your posting and target your ideal demographic. Not only does the portal allow you to gauge your overall reach, it can break the data down by age, gender, country and city. Even better, you can narrow your target demographic by boosting a post! This tool allows you to set a gender/age demographic, target locations, as well as, identify additional demographics, interests or behaviours to ensure your post reaches your desired audience.

  1. Incorporate visuals

Your success in social media relies heavily on strong visuals. Using eye-catching images and bold short text to attract potential applicants as they scroll through posts is vital.

  1. Monitor your success

Monitoring your success and learning from your failures is key. Social media is constantly changing. New posts drop your existing posts rapidly to the bottom of the feed. If you aren’t seeing the desired results, make sure to change text, images, platforms, post daily, or, sponsor an ad to increase your success.

  1. Screen potential employees

Think you found the one? Do your own research! 60% of employers currently use social media to screen applicants before making a final positive hiring decision.[i] Social media is an effortless way for an employer to learn more about candidate’s values and interests outside of what is on a polished resume.

With social media usage continuously growing, it’s a necessary medium to incorporate into recruitment strategies. But we know that everyone isn’t comfortable using social media to recruit.  No worries! Adecco has recruiters trained in attracting top talent through online recruitment efforts. Contact your local branch today!

For more information and articles, visit our Employer resources page on our website.


[i] Social Media Screening: The Good the Bad and the Ugly https://www.sterlingtalentsolutions.ca/blog/2017/04/social-media-screening-requirements/