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Quitting Your Job: 5 Undeniable Signs and How to Do It

Quitting Your Job: 5 Undeniable Signs and How to Do It

Nothing is quite as anxiety-inducing as quitting your job. Don’t lose sleep over your next resignation. Remain calm and professional and you’ll be free of your negative employment situation in no time.

Are you looking to quit your job? The majority of Canadian employees are ready to do it, according to a survey from Nielsen. Even when you’re unhappy, though, resigning is never easy. To help ease the process, Adecco presents the ultimate guide to how to quit your job.

Signs you should quit your job

Do you find yourself repeating “I want to quit my job”? There’s likely a good reason for that! Here are a few telltale signs it’s time to move on.

You’re unhappy

Simple as that. If it’s getting harder to get out of bed every morning or you’re finding yourself dragging your feet to go to work, it’s time to go. If you’re feeling unhappy at work, don’t worry, you’re not alone. In fact, more than half of Canadians are unhappy with their current work situation. Don’t dwell on the inevitable. Start looking for an employment opportunity that will spark joy in your life.

There’s no room to grow

If you’re not seeing opportunities to grow within the organization, you may start to feel discouraged at work. If you’re working for a company that doesn’t support your professional goals, be proactive. Find a role in an organization that values professional advancements and encourages development.

You’re stuck in a toxic environment

Identifiers of a toxic work environment: birdcage with workplace and stairs

Identifiers of a toxic work environment include: not getting along with your colleagues, discouraging and unfriendly management team, and unclear, unfair or inconsistent policies and procedures. It can be easy for us to overlook one negative factor at work, but when your job has no redeeming qualities, it’s time to move on.

Your compensation isn’t cutting it

Still waiting on that pay raise? Management dodging your meeting requests? If you’re feeling undercompensated in the workplace and the company isn’t responding to your pay increase requests, don’t carry on being underpaid. Look for a position with an organization that professionally and financially supports your needs.

Your gut says its time to move on

There’s a reason our parents always told us to listen to our gut. Our gut feelings are dictated by an internal database created by relatable past knowledge and experiences, making your intuition a valuable part of the decision-making process. So, when the little voice inside your head tells you it’s time to go, listen. Your intuition is probably right and there is likely a better opportunity out there for you elsewhere.

What to do when you’ve decided to quit your job

quitting-job-undeniable-signs-how-to-businessmen-on-move

Ready to make the leap to a new job? Check out our tips for quitting your job.

1. Give proper notice

Two weeks’ notice is standard, but be sure to reference your employee handbook before quitting to ensure you follow any requirements listed. By providing your employer with ample notice, you enable them to hire and on-board a replacement to avoid any disruptions to their workflow.

2. Meet with management

This isn’t a time for burning bridges. Rather, meet with management to quit in person and provide honest but constructive feedback on why you’ve decided it’s time to move on. Mention specifics where possible to help management gain insight on your rational and request a letter of recommendation to keep for future opportunities.

3. Write your letter of resignation

Keep it simple! There’s no need to stress over an elaborate resignation letter. State the position you are resigning from and the effective date. Remember to thank your employer for the opportunity and include a couple things you’ve learned from the role. Conclude your letter by offering your assistance with the transition. For sample letters of resignation, click here.

4. Tie up loose ends

Create a transition plan to hand off your responsibilities once you’ve left. Include specific tasks, determine who will take over responsibility for your projects and identify any additional administrative paperwork. Be sure to also notify clients or customers of your last day and introduce their contact moving forward.

5. Refresh and refocus

Transitioning out of a bad position is a traumatic endeavour. Take some time off to refresh and refocus before jumping into your next position. Taking time off work, or getting away for a vacation, can help you identify your work values, reflect on your past role and figure out where things went wrong. This will help you better navigate your job search and find the best opportunity for professional success.

Looking for work? Let us help! Take a look at the jobs we have available and get more advice on finding a job.

Lēad Blog is part of Adecco and Roevin Canada. Find and apply to your dream job, or get more career advice from our experts.

We’ve moved! Check out our new home at adecco.ca/blog for more great articles about Canada’s current employment landscape and career advice for employees and job seekers.

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